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In and Out of Character: Socratic Mimēsis

Dissertation, Cuny Graduate Center (2020)

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  1. Prologue.[author unknown] - 1987 - Utopian Studies 1:1-9.
    Generous selections from these four seminal texts on the theory and practice of education have never before appeared together in a single volume. The Introductions that precede the texts provide brief biographical sketches of each author, situating him within his broader historical, cultural and intellectual context. The editors also provide a brief outline of key themes that emerge within the selection as a helpful guide to the reader. The final chapter engages the reflections of the classic authors with contemporary issues (...)
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  • Cognitive penetrability and perceptual justification.Susanna Siegel - 2018 - In Jeremy Fantl, Matthew McGrath & Ernest Sosa (eds.), Contemporary epistemology: an anthology. Hoboken, NJ: Wiley.
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  • The Aporetic Tradition in Ancient Philosophy.Vasilis Politis (ed.) - 2017 - New York: Cambridge University Press.
    Ancient philosophers from an otherwise diverse range of traditions were connected by their shared use of aporia - translated as puzzlement rooted in conflicts of reasons - as a core tool in philosophical enquiry. The essays in this volume provide the first comprehensive study of aporetic methodology among numerous major figures and influential schools, including the Presocratics, Plato, Aristotle, Plutarch, Alexander of Aphrodisias, Academic sceptics, Pyrrhonian sceptics, Plotinus and Damascius. They explore the differences and similarities in these philosophers' approaches to (...)
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  • The Image of the Noble Sophist.Yancy Hughes Dominick - 2018 - Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy 22 (2):203-220.
    In this paper, I begin with an account of the initial distinction between likenesses and appearances, a distinction which may resemble the difference between sophists and philosophers. That distinction first arises immediately after the puzzling appearance of the noble sophist, who seems to occupy an odd space in between sophist and philosopher. In the second section, I look more closely at the noble sophist, and on what that figure might tell us about images and the use of images. I also (...)
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  • Existentialism.Alasdair MacIntyre - 1967 - In Paul Edwards (ed.), The Encyclopedia of philosophy. New York,: Macmillan. pp. 3--4.
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  • Poetic inspiration in early Greece.Penelope Murray - 2005 - In Andrew Laird (ed.), Ancient Literary Criticism. Oxford University Press UK.
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  • The Platonic Art of Comedy and Tragedy.Richard Patterson - 1982 - Philosophy and Literature 6 (1-2):76-93.
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  • Plato’s Protagoras: Essays on the Confrontation of Philosophy and Sophistry.Olof Pettersson & Vigdis Songe-Møller (eds.) - 2016 - Cham: Springer.
    This book presents a thorough study and an up to date anthology of Plato’s Protagoras. International authors' papers contribute to the task of understanding how Plato introduced and negotiated a new type of intellectual practice – called philosophy – and the strategies that this involved. They explore Plato’s dialogue, looking at questions of how philosophy and sophistry relate, both on a methodological and on a thematic level.
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  • Socrates and Hedonism: Protagoras 351b-358d.Donald J. Zeyl - 1980 - Phronesis 25 (3):250-269.
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  • The Socratic Elenchus.Charles M. Young - 2006 - In Hugh H. Benson (ed.), A Companion to Plato. Malden, MA, USA: Blackwell. pp. 55–69.
    This chapter contains sections titled: Introduction Preliminaries Apology 21b9–23c1: The Origins of the Socratic Elenchus Inconsistency Does Socrates Cheat? Some Stabs at Explanations Concluding Remarks Note.
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  • Socrates and Obedience.Gary Young - 1974 - Phronesis 19 (1):1-29.
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  • Self-refuting propositions and relativism.F. C. White - 1989 - Metaphilosophy 20 (1):84–92.
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  • Protagoras Unbound.F. C. White - 1975 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 5 (sup1):1-9.
    In this paper I want to do the following things. First I want to show that in the part of the Theaetetus where the relationship between knowledge and perception is examined, the concept of knowledge that is in question is very clearly characterized. We are left in no doubt as to what is to count as knowing. Secondly I want to unravel in some detail the case that Socrates puts on Protagoras’ behalf where he draws on what Protagoras actually wrote (...)
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  • Virtue, Character and Situation.Jonathan Webber - 2006 - Journal of Moral Philosophy 3 (2):193-213.
    Philosophers have recently argued that traditional discussions of virtue and character presuppose an account of behaviour that experimental psychology has shown to be false. Behaviour does not issue from global traits such as prudence, temperance, courage or fairness, they claim, but from local traits such as sailing-in-rough-weather-with-friends-courage and office-party-temperance. The data employed provides evidence for this view only if we understand it in the light of a behaviourist construal of traits in terms of stimulus and response, rather than in the (...)
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  • Protagoras and Inconsistency: Theaetetus 171 a6—c7.Sarah Waterlow - 1977 - Archiv für Geschichte der Philosophie 59 (1):19-36.
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  • Conditional irony in the Socratic dialogues.Iakovos Vasiliou - 1999 - Classical Quarterly 49 (02):456-.
    Socratic irony is potentially fertile ground for exegetical abuse. It can seem to offer an interpreter the chance to dismiss any claim which conflicts with his account of Socratic Philosophy merely by crying ‘irony’. If abused in this way, Socratic irony can quickly become a convenient receptacle for everything inimical to an interpretation. Much recent scholarship rightly reacts against this and devotes itself to explaining how Socrates actually means everything he says, at least everything of philosophical importance. But the fact (...)
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  • Mimêsis and the Platonic Dialogue.Voula Tsouna - 2013 - Rhizomata 1 (1):1-29.
    : The Republic is notorious for its attack against poetry and the final eviction of the poets from the ideal city. In both Book III and Book X the argument focuses on the concept of mimêsis, frequently rendered as ‘imitation’, which is partly allowed in Book III but unqualifiedly rejected in Book X. However, several ancient authors view Plato’s dialogues as products of mimêsis and Plato as an imitator. Plato himself acknowledges the mimetic character of his enterprise and invites us (...)
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  • Platonic Chronology.Holger Thesleff - 1989 - Phronesis 34 (1):1-26.
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  • Socratic Method and Socratic Truth.Harold Tarrant - unknown - In Sara Ahbel‐Rappe & Rachana Kamtekar (eds.), A Companion to Socrates. Oxford, UK: Blackwell. pp. 254–272.
    This chapter contains sections titled: Introduction Who or What is Refuted? Can Propositions Be Proven? What Is There That a Midwife Can Know Elenctically? What Is There To Be Known in the Apology? What Is There To Be Known in the Other Early Dialogues? Truth at the End of the Gorgias Conclusion.
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  • Socrates and Obedience to the Law.Nicholas D. Smith - 1984 - Apeiron 18 (1):10 - 18.
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  • Schizophrenia, consciousness, and the self.Louis A. Sass & Josef Parnas - 2003 - Schizophrenia Bulletin 29 (3):427-444.
    In recent years, there has been much focus on the apparent heterogeneity of schizophrenic symptoms. By contrast, this article proposes a unifying account emphasizing basic abnormalities of consciousness that underlie and also antecede a disparate assortment of signs and symptoms. Schizophrenia, we argue, is fundamentally a self-disorder or ipseity disturbance that is characterized by complementary distortions of the act of awareness: hyperreflexivity and diminished self-affection. Hyperreflexivity refers to forms of exaggerated self-consciousness in which aspects of oneself are experienced as akin (...)
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  • Introduction.Burkhard Reis & Dorothea Frede - 2009 - In Burkhard Reis & Dorothea Frede (eds.), Body and Soul in Ancient Philosophy. Walter de Gruyter. pp. 1-20.
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  • What do the Arguments in the Protagoras Amount to?Vasilis Politis - 2012 - Phronesis 57 (3):209-239.
    Abstract The main thesis of the paper is that, in the coda to the Protagoras (360e-end), Plato tells us why and with what justification he demands a definition of virtue: namely, in order to resolve a particular aporia . According to Plato's assessment of the outcome of the arguments of the dialogue, the principal question, whether or not virtue can be taught , has, by the end of the dialogue, emerged as articulating an aporia , in that both protagonists, Socrates (...)
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  • The Theaetetus of Plato. [REVIEW]Ronald Polansky - 1992 - Ancient Philosophy 12 (2):434-441.
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  • Plato on virtue in the menexenvs.Federico M. Petrucci - 2017 - Classical Quarterly 67 (1).
    TheMenexenusis usually described as a ‘riddle’ or ‘puzzle’. The difficulties it poses have given rise to a multitude of exegeses, revolving around two antithetical readings. On the one hand, some scholars tend to consider the dialogue an ironic critique of Athenian democracy and/or of democratic rhetoric. According to this perspective, Plato expressed this criticism through a paradoxical and somehow feverishepitaphios. On the other hand, some scholars consider the funeral oration to be quite serious. According to this perspective, Plato aimed at (...)
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  • The Recoil Argument.Jay Newman - 1982 - Apeiron 16 (1):47 - 52.
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  • The Postulated Author: Critical Monism as a Regulative Ideal.Alexander Nehamas - 1981 - Critical Inquiry 8 (1):133-149.
    The aim of interpretation is to capture the past in the future: to capture, not to recapture, first, because the iterative prefix suggests that meaning, which was once manifest, must now be found again. But the postulated author dispenses with this assumption. Literary texts are produced by very complicated actions, while the significance of even our simplest acts is often far from clear. Parts of the meaning of a text may become clear only because of developments occurring long after its (...)
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  • Popular Comedy in Aristophanes.Charles T. Murphy - 1972 - American Journal of Philology 93 (1):169.
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  • A Cock for Asclepius.Glenn W. Most - 1993 - Classical Quarterly 43 (1):96-111.
    In any list of famous last words, Socrates' are likely to figure near the top. Details of the final moments of celebrities tend anyway to exert a peculiar fascination upon the rest of us: life's very contingency provokes a need to see lives nevertheless as meaningful organic wholes, defined as such precisely by their final closure; so that even the most trivial aspects of their ending can come to seem bearers of profound significance, soliciting moral reflections apparently not less urgent (...)
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  • Socratic Persuasion in the Crito.Christopher Moore - 2011 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 19 (6):1021-1046.
    Socrates does not use the Laws' Speech in the Crito principally to persuade Crito to accept his coming execution. It is used instead to persuade Crito to examine and work on his inadequate view of justice. Crito's view of justice fails to coordinate one's duties to friends and those to the law. The Laws' Speech accomplishes this persuasive goal by accompanying Crito’s earlier speech. Both start from the same view of justice, one that Crito accepts, but reach opposing conclusions. Crito (...)
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  • Remembering Pericles.S. Sara Monoson - 1998 - Political Theory 26 (4):489-513.
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  • Commentary on Clay.Mitchell Miller - 1987 - Proceedings of the Boston Area Colloquium of Ancient Philosophy 3 (1):158-164.
    Acknowledging with Professor Clay the important methodological principle that interpretation must begin within the dramatic horizon of each dialogue, I argue that there are analogies between discontinuities within single dialogues and discontinuities between certain dialogues. Recognizing this opens up the possibility of thinking of certain groups of dialogues as a series of fresh beginnings that lead the reader through different levels of understanding. I illustrate this idea by considering the unity of the Republic and the Parmenides.
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  • Is Protagorean Relativism Self-Refuting?Jack W. Meiland - 1979 - Grazer Philosophische Studien 9 (1):51-68.
    This paper first explains why the charge of self-refutation against extreme relativism is so important and then defends extreme relativism against two of the most recent and most sophisticated accusations of self-refutation. It is shown that these accusations seem plausible only because they illicitly employ principles appropriate only to absolute truth; hence these accusations are unsound. One central topic of discussion in the paper is the relation between "a believes that p" and "p is true for a".
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  • Socrates and the duty to philosophize.Mark L. McPherran - 1986 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 24 (4):541-560.
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  • Socrates on Political Disobedience: A Reply to Gary Young.Robert J. McLaughlin - 1976 - Phronesis 21 (3):185 - 197.
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  • Protagoras - or Plato?Joseph P. Maguire - 1973 - Phronesis 18 (2):115 - 138.
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  • Self-Refutation--A Formal Analysis.J. L. Mackie - 1965 - Journal of Symbolic Logic 30 (3):365-366.
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  • Dancing Naked with Socrates.Christopher P. Long - 2003 - Ancient Philosophy 23 (1):49-69.
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  • Toward a Consistent Interpretation of the Protagoras.George Klosko - 1979 - Archiv für Geschichte der Philosophie 61 (2):125-142.
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  • Plato.G. B. Kerferd - 1951 - The Classical Review 1 (3-4):159-.
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  • A Return to the Theory of the Verb be and the Concept of Being.Charles H. Kahn - 2004 - Ancient Philosophy 24 (2):381-405.
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  • The Menexenus Reconsidered.Pamela M. Huby - 1957 - Phronesis 2 (2):104-114.
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  • Achilles, Socrates, and Democracy.Richard Holway - 1994 - Political Theory 22 (4):561-590.
    Socrates: Euthyphro, you think that you have such accurate knowledge of things divine, and what is holy and unholy, that... you can accuse your father? You are not afraid that you yourself are doing an unholy deed? Euthyphro: Why Socrates, if I did not have an accurate knowledge of all that, I should be good for nothing, and Euthyphro would be no different from the general run of men. (Euthyphro, 4e-5a).
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  • The Art of Living. [REVIEW]Stephen Halliwell - 2000 - Ancient Philosophy 20 (2):492-500.
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  • Plato and erotic reciprocity.David M. Halperin - 1986 - Classical Antiquity 5 (1):60-80.
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  • Plato and Performance.John Gould - 1992 - Apeiron 25 (4):13-26.
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  • Protagorean relativism and physis.David K. Glidden - 1975 - Phronesis 20 (3):209-227.
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  • Ancient psychotherapy.Christopher Gill - 1985 - Journal of the History of Ideas 46 (3):307.
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  • In and Out of Worlds.Zina Giannopoulou - 2011 - Ancient Philosophy 31 (2):275-294.
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  • Rhetoric and Reason.Tania L. Gergel - 2000 - Ancient Philosophy 20 (2):289-310.
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