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  1. Toward a Feminist Theory of the State.Catharine A. MacKinnon - 1989 - Law and Philosophy 10 (4):447-452.
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  • Intention.G. E. M. Anscombe - 1957 - Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 57:321-332.
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  • Science as Social Knowledge: Values and Objectivity in Scientific Inquiry.Helen E. Longino - 1990 - Princeton University Press.
    This is an important book precisely because there is none other quite like it.
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  • Toward a Feminist Firm.Robbin Derry - 1996 - Business Ethics Quarterly 6 (1):101-109.
    This response to Dobson and White’s call for a feminine firm argues that such a concept is based on amisinterpretation of Gilligan’s research. Moreover, virtue ethics and feminine ethics do not share a common approach to nurturing relationships or the moral orientation of care. Acknowledging the worthwhile goals of Dobson and White’s endeavor, the feminist firm is presented as offering greater potential to achieve these goals.
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  • Reclaiming Marginalized Stakeholders.Robbin Derry - 2012 - Journal of Business Ethics 111 (2):253-264.
    Within stakeholder literature, much attention has been given to which stakeholders "really count." This article strives to explain why organizational theorists should abandon the pursuit of "Who and What Really Counts" to challenge the assumption of a managerial perspective that defines stakeholder legitimacy. Reflecting on the paucity of employee rights and protections in marginalized work environments, I argue that as organizational researchers, we must recognize and take responsibility for the impact of our research models and visions. By confronting and rethinking (...)
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  • Witnessing and Organization.Janet Borgerson - 2010 - Philosophy Today 54 (1):78-87.
    This article draws in particular on existential-phenomenological notions of “witnessing.” Witnessing, often conceived in the context of testimony, obviously involves epistemological concerns, such as how we come to know through the experiences and reports of others. I shall argue, however, that witnessing as a mode of intersubjectivity offers understandings that involve questions about how people come to be. More specifically, I want to consider the positive potential of “witnessing” to disrupt intersubjective completeness or closure, particularly as this relates to work (...)
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  • Preparing Ethics for the Future.Janet Borgerson - 2005 - Journal of Philosophical Research 30 (9999):235-249.
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  • Addressing the 'Global Basic Structure' in the Ethics of International Health Research Involving Human Subjects.Janet Borgerson - 2005 - Journal of Philosophical Research 30 (9999):235-249.
    The context of international health research involving human subjects, and this should appear obvious, is the human community. As such, basic questions of how human beings should be treated by other human beings, particularly in situations of unequal power – e.g., in the form of control, choice, or opportunity – lay at the foundations of related ethical discourse when ethics are discussed at all. I trace a narrative that follows upon a recent revision process of international guidelines for biomedical research (...)
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  • On the Harmony of Feminist Ethics and Business Ethics.Janet L. Borgerson - 2007 - Business and Society Review 112 (4):477-509.
    If business requires ethical solutions that are viable in the liminal landscape between concepts and corporate office, then business ethics and corporate social responsibility should offer tools that can survive the trek, that flourish in this well-traveled, but often unarticulated, environment. Indeed, feminist ethics produces, accesses, and engages such tools. However, work in BE and CSR consistently conflates feminist ethics and feminine ethics and care ethics. I offer clarification and invoke the analytic power of three feminist ethicists 'in action' whose (...)
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  • Sweatshops, Structural Injustice, and the Wrong of Exploitation: Why Multinational Corporations Have Positive Duties to the Global Poor.Brian Berkey - 2021 - Journal of Business Ethics 169 (1):43-56.
    It is widely thought that firms that employ workers in “sweatshop” conditions wrongfully exploit those workers. This claim has been challenged by those who argue that because companies are not obligated to hire their workers in the first place, employing them cannot be wrong so long as they voluntarily accept their jobs and genuinely benefit from them. In this article, I argue that we can maintain that at least many sweatshop employees are wrongfully exploited, while accepting the plausible claim at (...)
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  • Feminist epistemology and the politics of knowledge : questions of marginality.Lorraine Code - 2014 - In Mary Evans, Clare Hemmings, Marsha Henry, Hazel Johnstone, Sumi Madhok, Ania Plomien & Sadie Wearing (eds.), The SAGE handbook of feminist theory. Thousand Oaks, California: SAGE reference.
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  • Sweatshops, Choice, and Exploitation.Matt Zwolinski - 2007 - Business Ethics Quarterly 17 (4):689-727.
    This paper argues that a sweatshop worker's choice to accept the conditions of his or her employment is morally significant, both as an exercise of autonomy and as an expression of preference. This fact establishes a moral claim against interference in the conditions of sweatshop labor by third parties such as governments or consumer boycott groups. It should also lead us to doubt those who call for MNEs to voluntarily improve working conditions, at least when their arguments are based on (...)
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  • Small Business Social Responsibility: Expanding Core CSR Theory.Laura J. Spence - 2016 - Business and Society 55 (1):23-55.
    This article seeks to expand business and society research in a number of ways. Its primary purpose is to redraw two core corporate social responsibility theories, enhancing their relevance for small business. This redrawing is done by the application of the ethic of care, informed by the value of feminist perspectives and the extant empirical research on small business social responsibility. It is proposed that the expanded versions of core theory have wider relevance, value, and implications beyond the small firm (...)
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  • Women Workers, Industrialization, Global Supply Chains and Corporate Codes of Conduct.Marina Prieto-Carrón - 2008 - Journal of Business Ethics 83 (1):5-17.
    The restructured globalized economy has provided women with employment opportunities. Globalisation has also meant a shift towards self-regulation of multinationals as part of the restructuring of the world economy that increases among others things, flexible employment practices, worsening of labour conditions and lower wages for many women workers around the world. In this context, as part of the global trend emphasising Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) in the 1980s, one important development has been the growth of voluntary Corporate Codes of Conduct (...)
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  • ‘Nimble Fingers Make Cheap Workers’: An Analysis of Women's Employment in Third World Export Manufacturing.Ruth Pearson & Diane Elson - 1981 - Feminist Review 7 (1):87-107.
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  • CSR as Gendered Neocoloniality in the Global South.Banu Ozkazanc-Pan - 2018 - Journal of Business Ethics 160 (4):851-864.
    Corporate social responsibility has generally been recognized as corporate pro-social behavior aimed at remediating social issues external to organizations, while political CSR has acknowledged the political nature of such activity beyond social aims. Despite the growth of this literature, there is still little attention given to gender as the starting point for a conversation on CSR, ethics, and the Global South. Deploying critical insights from feminist work in postcolonial traditions, I outline how MNCs replicate gendered neocolonialist discourses and perpetuate exploitative (...)
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  • Engaging Fringe Stakeholders in Business and Society Research: Applying Visual Participatory Research Methods.Judy N. Muthuri & Lauren McCarthy - 2018 - Business and Society 57 (1):131-173.
    Business and society researchers, as well as practitioners, have been critiqued for ignoring those with less voice and power often referred to as “fringe stakeholders.” Existing methods used in B&S research often fail to address issues of meaningful participation, voice and power, especially in developing countries. In this article, we stress the utility of visual participatory research methods in B&S research to fill this gap. Through a case study on engaging Ghanaian cocoa farmers on gender inequality issues, we explore how (...)
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  • Under Western Eyes: Feminist Scholarship and Colonial Discourses.Chandra Mohanty - 1988 - Feminist Review 30 (1):61-88.
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  • “There is no time for rest”: Gendered CSR, sustainable development and the unpaid care work governance gap.Lauren McCarthy - 2018 - Business Ethics 27 (4):337-349.
    Unpaid care work, including child care, elder care, and housework, is unremunerated work essential to human survival and flourishing. Worldwide, women disproportionally carry out this work, impacting upon their ability to engage in other activities, such as education, employment, or leisure. Despite a growing number of businesses engaging in “gendered CSR,” in the form of women's empowerment projects, attention to unpaid care work remains little discussed in the literature, despite its importance to sustainable development. Applying Diane Elson's feminist economic framework (...)
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  • Review of Larry May: Sharing Responsibility[REVIEW]Larry May - 1994 - Ethics 104 (4):890-893.
    Are individuals responsible for the consequences of actions taken by their community? What about their community's inaction or its attitudes? In this innovative book, Larry May departs from the traditional Western view that moral responsibility is limited to the consequences of overt individual action. Drawing on the insights of Arendt, Jaspers, and Sartre, he argues that even when individuals are not direct participants, they share responsibility for various harms perpetrated by their communities.
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  • Is the sex of the knower epistemologically significant?Lorraine B. Code - 1981 - Metaphilosophy 12 (3-4):267-276.
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  • Challenging Masculinity in CSR Disclosures: Silencing of Women’s Voices in Tanzania’s Mining Industry.Sarah Lauwo - 2018 - Journal of Business Ethics 149 (3):689-706.
    This paper presents a feminist analysis of corporate social responsibility in a male-dominated industry within a developing country context. It seeks to raise awareness of the silencing of women’s voices in CSR reports produced by mining companies in Tanzania. Tanzania is one of the poorest countries in Africa, and women are often marginalised in employment and social policy considerations. Drawing on work by Hélène Cixous, a post-structuralist/radical feminist scholar, the paper challenges the masculinity of CSR discourses that have repeatedly masked (...)
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  • Contingent Natures and Virtuous Knowers.Rebecca Kukla & Laura Ruetsche - 2002 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 32 (3):389-418.
    When Sandra Harding called for an epistemology of science whose systematic attention to the gendered Status of epistemic agents renders it ‘less partial and distorted’ than ‘traditional’ epistemologies, some commentators recoiled in horror. Propelled by ‘a mad form of the genetic fallacy’ they said, she descends ‘the slide to an arational account of science.’ On a less melodramatic reading, feminist epistemologies such as Harding's advocate not irrationalism, but senses of rationality more expanded than those which they associate with ‘traditional’ epistemology.
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  • Gendering CSR in the Arab Middle East: An Institutional Perspective.Charlotte M. Karam & Dima Jamali - 2013 - Business Ethics Quarterly 23 (1):31-68.
    ABSTRACT:This paper explores how corporations, through their Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) activities, can help to effect positive developmental change. We use research on institutional change, deinstitutionalization, and institutional work to develop our central theoretical framework. This framework allows us to suggest more explicitly how CSR can potentially be mobilized as a purposive form of institutional work aimed at disrupting existing institutions in favor of positive change. We take the gender institution in the Arab Middle East as a case in point. (...)
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  • Corporate Social Responsibility and Women’s Entrepreneurship: Towards a More Adequate Theory of “Work”.Mary Johnstone-Louis - 2017 - Business Ethics Quarterly 27 (4):569-602.
    ABSTRACT:Programs aimed at increasing women’s entrepreneurship are a rapidly proliferating class of CSR initiatives across the globe with participation by many of the world’s largest corporations. The gendered nature of this phenomenon suggests that feminist approaches to CSR may offer a particularly salient mode of their analysis. In this article, I argue that insights from feminist economics regarding the historically prevalent—but narrow and gendered—definition of work, which artificially separates production from reproduction, provide fruitful tools for theory building when conceptualizing gender (...)
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  • Direction of fit.I. Lloyd Humberstone - 1992 - Mind 101 (401):59-83.
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  • Situated Knowledges: The Science Question in Feminism and the Privilege of Partial Perspective.Donna Haraway - 1988 - Feminist Studies 14 (3):575-599.
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  • Guest Editors’ Introduction: Gender, Business Ethics, and Corporate Social Responsibility: Assessing and Refocusing a Conversation.Kate Grosser, Jeremy Moon & Julie A. Nelson - 2017 - Business Ethics Quarterly 27 (4):541-567.
    ABSTRACT:This article reviews a conversation between business ethicists and feminist scholars begun in the early 1990s and traces the development of that conversation in relation to feminist theory. A bibliographic analysis of the business ethics and corporate social responsibility literatures over a twenty-five-year period elucidates the degree to which gender has been a salient concern, the methodologies adopted, and the ways in which gender has been analyzed. Identifying significant limitations to the incorporation of feminist theory in these literatures, we discuss (...)
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  • In a Different Voice: Psychological Theory and Women’s Development.Carol Gilligan - 1982 - The Personalist Forum 2 (2):150-152.
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  • Being and Time.M. HEIDEGGER - 1962
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  • Feminism and economics.Julie Nelson - 1995 - Journal of Economic Perspectives 9 (2):131-148.
    An article in The Chronicle of Higher Education of June 30, 1993, reported, “Two decades after it began redefining debates” in many other disciplines, “feminist thinking seems suddenly to have arrived in economics.” Many economists, of course, did not happen to be in the station when this train arrived, belated as it might be. Many who might have heard rumor of its coming have not yet learned just what arguments are involved or what it promises for the refinement of the (...)
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  • Capabilities as Fundamental Entitlements: Sen and Social Justice.Martha Nussbaum - 2003 - Feminist Economics 9 (2-3):33-59.
    Amartya Sen has made a major contribution to the theory of social justice, and of gender justice, by arguing that capabilities are the relevant space of comparison when justice-related issues are considered. This article supports Sen's idea, arguing that capabilities supply guidance superior to that of utility and resources (the view's familiar opponents), but also to that of the social contract tradition, and at least some accounts of human rights. But I argue that capabilities can help us to construct a (...)
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  • Analyzing Gender, Intersectionality, and Multiple Inequalities: Global, Transnational and Local Contexts.[author unknown] - 2011
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  • The Ethics of Care. Personal, Political, and Global.Virginia Held - 2007 - Tijdschrift Voor Filosofie 69 (2):399-399.
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  • Five Faces of Oppression.Iris M. Young - 1988 - Philosophical Forum 19 (4):270.
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  • The Traffneim Raynce R・Reiter. ed.Gayle Rubin - 1975 - In Rayna R. Reiter (ed.), Toward an Anthropology of Women. Monthly Review Press.
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