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  1. Heidegger’s Critique of Realism.Mark Tanzer - 1995 - Southwest Philosophy Review 11 (2):145-159.
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  • The Role of the Beiträge in Heidegger’s Critique of Science.Trish Glazebrook - 2001 - Philosophy Today 45 (1):24-32.
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  • Realism, Reliabilism, and the 'Strong Programme' in the Sociology of Scientific Knowledge.Jeff Kochan - 2008 - International Studies in the Philosophy of Science 22 (1):21 – 38.
    In this essay, I respond to Tim Lewens's proposal that realists and Strong Programme theorists can find common ground in reliabilism. I agree with Lewens, but point to difficulties in his argument. Chief among these is his assumption that reliabilism is incompatible with the Strong Programme's principle of symmetry. I argue that the two are, in fact, compatible, and that Lewens misses this fact because he wrongly supposes that reliabilism entails naturalism. The Strong Programme can fully accommodate a reliabilism which (...)
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  • Heidegger: Between Idealism and Realism.Lambert V. Stepanich - 1991 - The Harvard Review of Philosophy 1 (1):20-28.
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  • Heidegger: Between Idealism and Realism.Lambert V. Stepanich - 1991 - The Harvard Review of Philosophy 1 (1):20-28.
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  • Heidegger and Peirce: Beyond “Realism or Idealism”.Patrick L. Bourgeois & Sandra B. Rosenthal - 1988 - Southwest Philosophy Review 4 (1):103-110.
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  • Heidegger on Realism and Idealism.Mark Basil Tanzer - 1998 - Journal of Philosophical Research 23:95-111.
    This paper concerns the relation of Heidegger’s thought to the traditionally opposed positions of realism and idealism: a dilemma that Heidegger explicitly addresses in Section 43 of Being and Time. Heidegger’s attempt to forge a position ‘between’ realism and idealism has recently been interpreted in a number of ways, depending on whether Heidegger’s affinity with realism or his affinity with idealism is prioritized. My contention is that Heidegger’s realist and idealist dimensions are equally essential to his thought in view of (...)
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  • Heidegger on Realism and Idealism.Mark Basil Tanzer - 1998 - Journal of Philosophical Research 23:95-111.
    This paper concerns the relation of Heidegger’s thought to the traditionally opposed positions of realism and idealism: a dilemma that Heidegger explicitly addresses in Section 43 of Being and Time. Heidegger’s attempt to forge a position ‘between’ realism and idealism has recently been interpreted in a number of ways, depending on whether Heidegger’s affinity with realism or his affinity with idealism is prioritized. My contention is that Heidegger’s realist and idealist dimensions are equally essential to his thought in view of (...)
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  • Vampires: Social Constructivism, Realism, and Other Philosophical Undead.Joseph Rouse - 2002 - History and Theory 41 (1):60–78.
    Social Constructivism and the Philosophy of Science by Andre Kukla The Social Construction of What? by Ian Hacking.
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  • Heidegger's Kantian Idealism Revisited.William Blattner - 2004 - Inquiry: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy 47 (4):321 – 337.
    I offer a revised interpretation of Heidegger's ontological idealism, his thesis that being, but not entities, depends on Dasein ? as well as its relationship to Kant's transcendental idealism. I build from my earlier efforts on this topic by modifying them and defending my basic line of interpretation against criticisms advanced by Cerbone, Philipse, and Carman. In essence, my reading of Heidegger goes like this: what it means to say that "being" depends on Dasein is that the criteria and standards (...)
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  • Coping with Things-in-Themselves: A Practice-Based Phenomenological Argument for Realism.Hubert L. Dreyfus & Charles Spinosa - 1999 - Inquiry: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy 42 (1):49-78.
    Against Davidsonian (or deflationary) realism, it is argued that it is coherent to believe that science can in principle give us access to the functional components of the universe as they are in themselves in distinction from how they appear to us on the basis of our quotidian concerns or sensory capacities. The first section presents the deflationary realist's argument against independence. The second section then shows that, although Heidegger pioneered the deflationary realist account of the everyday, he sought to (...)
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  • Heidegger and Scientific Realism.Trish Glazebrook - 2001 - Continental Philosophy Review 34 (4):361-401.
    This paper describes Heidegger as a robust scientific realist, explains why his view has received such conflicting treatment, and concludes that the special significance of his position lies in his insistence upon linking the discussion of science to the question of its relation with technology. It shows that Heidegger, rather than accepting the usual forced option between realism and antirealism, advocates a realism in which he embeds the antirealist thesis that the idea of reality independent of human understanding is unintelligible. (...)
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  • Heidegger’s Categories in Being and Time.Robert Brandom - 1983 - The Monist 66 (3):387-409.
    In Division One of Being and Time Heidegger presents a novel categorization of what there is, and an original account of the project of ontology and consequently of the nature and genesis of those ontological categories. He officially recognizes two categories of Being: Zuhandensein and Vorhandensein. Vorhandene things are roughly the objective, person-independent, causally interacting subjects of natural scientific inquiry. Zuhandene things are those which a neo-Kantian would describe as having been imbued with human values and significances. In addition to (...)
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  • Review: Vampires: Social Constructivism, Realism, and Other Philosophical Undead. [REVIEW]Joseph Rouse - 2002 - History and Theory 41 (1):60-78.
    Social Constructivism and the Philosophy of Science by Andre Kukla The Social Construction of What? by Ian Hacking.
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  • Heidegger on Realism and the Correspondence Theory of Truth.John Tietz - 1993 - Dialogue 32 (1):59-.
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  • Is Heidegger a Kantian Idealist?William D. Blattner - 1994 - Inquiry: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy 37 (2):185 – 201.
    It is argued that Heidegger should be seen as something of a Kantian Idealist. Like Kant, Heidegger distinguishes two standpoints (transcendental and empirical) which we can occupy when we ask the question whether natural things depend on us. He agrees with Kant that from the empirical or human standpoint we are justified in saying that natural things do not depend on us. But in contrast with Kant, Heidegger argues that from the transcendental standpoint we can say neither that natural things (...)
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  • World, World‐Entry, and Realism in Early Heidegger.David R. Cerbone - 1995 - Inquiry: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy 38 (4):401 – 421.
    Interpretations of Heidegger's Being and Time have tended to founder on the question of whether he is in the end a realist or an idealist, in part because of Heidegger's own rather enigmatic remarks on the subject. Many have thus depicted him as being in some way ambivalent, and so as holding on to an unstable combination of the two opposing positions. Recently, William Blattner has explained the apparent ambivalence by appealing to Kant's transcendental/empirical distinction. Although an ingenious reading of (...)
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  • Kuhn, Heidegger, and Scientific Realism.Joseph Rouse - 1981 - Man and World 14 (3):269-290.
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  • Heidegger on the Experiment.Trish Glazebrook - 1998 - Philosophy Today 42 (3):250-261.
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  • Heidegger and the Problem of Idealism.Piotr Hoffman - 2000 - Inquiry: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy 43 (4):403 – 411.
    Was Heidegger a 'realist' or an 'idealist'? The issue has been and continues to be hotly debated in Heidegger scholarship. Here it is argued that the much more desirable realistic interpretation of Heidegger can be sustained, provided his theory of moods is given its due. Moods, I argue, are not only 'equiprimordial' with Dasein's understanding of being, but are also irreducible to the latter. It is often held - correctly, as it seems to the author - that Heidegger's idealism is (...)
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  • From Φvσις to Nature, Τε′Χνη to Technology: Heidegger on Aristotle, Galileo, and Newton.Trish Glazebrook - 2000 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 38 (1):95-118.
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  • Heidegger on the Problem of Reality.Ka-Wing Leung - 2006 - New Yearbook for Phenomenology and Phenomenological Philosophy 6 (1):169-184.
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  • Scientific Realism and Phenomenology.Hans Seigfried - 1980 - Zeitschrift für Philosophische Forschung 34 (3):395 - 404.
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