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  1. The Death of the Sensuous Chemist: The ‘New’ Chemistry and the Transformation of Sensuous Technology.Lissa Roberts - 1995 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 26 (4):503-529.
    The effect of gamma irradiation on the dislocation relaxation peak, i.e. the Bordoni peak, of high purity polycrystalline gold has been studied at frequency of 10MHz. It was found that the effect of gamma radiation is more significant in specimen irradiation at room temperature (1A) than that irradiated at liquid nitrogen temperature. The variation of the peak height, and temperature of the dislocation relaxation peak as a function of gamma doses are explained in terms of the Kink-Pair formation model.
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  • Historicizing H2O. [REVIEW]Seymour H. Mauskopf - 2013 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 44 (4):623-630.
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  • Inventing Temperature: Measurement and Scientific Progress.Hasok Chang - 2004 - Oup Usa.
    In Inventing Temperature, Chang takes a historical and philosophical approach to examine how scientists were able to use scientific method to test the reliability of thermometers; how they measured temperature beyond the reach of thermometers; and how they came to measure the reliability and accuracy of these instruments without a circular reliance on the instruments themselves. Chang discusses simple epistemic and technical questions about these instruments, which in turn lead to more complex issues about the solutions that were developed.
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  • The Rise and Fall of Nitrous Air Eudiometry: Enlightenment Ideals, Embodied Skills, and the Conflicts of Experimental Philosophy.Victor D. Boantza - 2013 - History of Science 51 (4):377-412.
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  • Structural Realism Versus Standard Scientific Realism: The Case of Phlogiston and Dephlogisticated Air.James Ladyman - 2011 - Synthese 180 (2):87 - 101.
    The aim of this paper is to revisit the phlogiston theory to see what can be learned from it about the relationship between scientific realism, approximate truth and successful reference. It is argued that phlogiston theory did to some extent correctly describe the causal or nomological structure of the world, and that some of its central terms can be regarded as referring. However, it is concluded that the issue of whether or not theoretical terms successfully refer is not the key (...)
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  • On Lavoisier's Achievement in Chemistry.Geoffrey Blumenthal - 2013 - Centaurus 55 (1):20-47.
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  • We Have Never Been Whiggish (About Phlogiston)1.Hasok Chang - 2009 - Centaurus 51 (4):239-264.
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  • Leviathan and the Air-Pump: Hobbes, Boyle, and the Experimental Life.Steven Shapin & Simon Schaffer - 1985 - Princeton University Press.
    In a new introduction, the authors describe how science and its social context were understood when this book was first published, and how the study of the history of science has changed since then.
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  • The Structure of Scientific Revolutions.Thomas S. Kuhn - 1962 - University of Chicago Press.
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  • The Role of Trust in Knowledge.John Hardwig - 1991 - Journal of Philosophy 88 (12):693-708.
    Most traditional epistemologists see trust and knowledge as deeply antithetical: we cannot know by trusting in the opinions of others; knowledge must be based on evidence, not mere trust. I argue that this is badly mistaken. Modern knowers cannot be independent and self-reliant. In most disciplines, those who do not trust cannot know. Trust is thus often more epistemically basic than empirical evidence or logical argument, for the evidence and the argument are available only through trust. Finally, since the reliability (...)
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  • Epistemic Dependence.John Hardwig - 1985 - Journal of Philosophy 82 (7):335-349.
    find myself believing all sorts 0f things for which I d0 not possess evidence: that smoking cigarettes causes lung cancer, that my car keeps stalling because the carburetor needs LO be rebuilt, that mass media threaten democracy, that slums cause emotional disorders, that my irregular heart beat is premature ventricular contraction, that students} grades are not correlated with success in the ncmacadcmic world, that nuclear power plants are not safe (enough) . . . The list 0f things I believe, though (...)
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  • The Anatomy of Science.Gilbert N. Lewis - 1928 - Revue de Métaphysique et de Morale 35 (2):12-13.
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  • The Advancement of Science: Science Without Legend, Objectivity Without Illusions.Philip Kitcher - 1993 - Oxford, England: Oxford University Press.
    During the last three decades, reflections on the growth of scientific knowledge have inspired historians, sociologists, and some philosophers to contend that scientific objectivity is a myth. In this book, Kitcher attempts to resurrect the notions of objectivity and progress in science by identifying both the limitations of idealized treatments of growth of knowledge and the overreactions to philosophical idealizations. Recognizing that science is done not by logically omniscient subjects working in isolation, but by people with a variety of personal (...)
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  • The Nature of Mathematical Knowledge.Philip Kitcher - 1983 - Oxford, England: Oxford University Press.
    This book argues against the view that mathematical knowledge is a priori,contending that mathematics is an empirical science and develops historically,just as ...
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  • Changing Order: Replication and Induction in Scientific Practice.Harry M. Collins - 1985 - Chicago, IL, USA: University of Chicago Press.
    This fascinating study in the sociology of science explores the way scientists conduct, and draw conclusions from, their experiments. The book is organized around three case studies: replication of the TEA-laser, detecting gravitational rotation, and some experiments in the paranormal. "In his superb book, Collins shows why the quest for certainty is disappointed. He shows that standards of replication are, of course, social, and that there is consequently no outside standard, no Archimedean point beyond society from which we can lever (...)
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  • Is Water H2O? Evidence, Realism and Pluralism.Hasok Chang - 2012 - Boston Studies in the Philosophy and History of Science.
    This book exhibits deep philosophical quandaries and intricacies of the historical development of science lying behind a simple and fundamental item of common sense in modern science, namely the composition of water as H2O. Three main phases of development are critically re-examined, covering the historical period from the 1760s to the 1860s: the Chemical Revolution, early electrochemistry, and early atomic chemistry. In each case, the author concludes that the empirical evidence available at the time was not decisive in settling the (...)
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  • The Structure of Scientific Revolutions.Thomas Samuel Kuhn - 1962 - Chicago: University of Chicago Press.
    A scientific community cannot practice its trade without some set of received beliefs. These beliefs form the foundation of the "educational initiation that prepares and licenses the student for professional practice". The nature of the "rigorous and rigid" preparation helps ensure that the received beliefs are firmly fixed in the student's mind. Scientists take great pains to defend the assumption that scientists know what the world is like...To this end, "normal science" will often suppress novelties which undermine its foundations. Research (...)
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  • The Persistence of Epistemic Objects Through Scientific Change.Hasok Chang - 2011 - Erkenntnis 75 (3):413-429.
    Why do some epistemic objects persist despite undergoing serious changes, while others go extinct in similar situations? Scientists have often been careless in deciding which epistemic objects to retain and which ones to eliminate; historians and philosophers of science have been on the whole much too unreflective in accepting the scientists’ decisions in this regard. Through a re-examination of the history of oxygen and phlogiston, I will illustrate the benefits to be gained from challenging and disturbing the commonly accepted continuities (...)
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  • The Uses of Experiment: Studies in the Natural Sciences.David Gooding, Trevor Pinch & Simon Schaffer - 1989 - Cambridge University Press.
    Contributors; Preface; Introduction; Part I. Instruments in Experiments: 1. Scientific instruments: models of brass and aids to discovery; 2. Glass works: Newton’s prisms and the uses of experiment; 3. A viol of water or a wedge of glass; Part II. Experiment and Argument: 4. Galileo’s experimental discourse; 5. Fresnel, Poisson and the white spot: the role of successful predictions in the acceptance of scientific theories; 6. The rhetoric of experiment; Part III. Representing and Realising: 7. ’Magnetic curves’ and the magnetic (...)
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  • A Social History of Truth: Civility and Science in Seventeenth-Century England.Steven Shapin - 1994 - University of Chicago Press.
    In A Social History of Truth, Shapin engages these universal questions through an elegant recreation of a crucial period in the history of early modern science: ...
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  • Psychological Knowledge: A Social History and Philosophy.Martin Kusch - 1998 - Routledge.
    Psychologists and philosophers have assumed that psychological knowledge is knowledge about, and held by, the individual mind. _Psychological Knowledge_ challenges these views. It argues that bodies of psychological knowledge are social institutions like money or the monarchy, and that mental states are social artefacts like coins or crowns. Martin Kusch takes on arguments of alternative proposals, shows what is wrong with them, and demonstrates how his own social-philosophical approach constitutes an advance. We see that exists a substantial natural amount of (...)
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  • Chemistry, Physics, and the Chemical Revolution.Evan Melhado - 1985 - Isis 76:195-211.
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  • The "Revolution in Chemistry and Physics": Overthrow of a Reigning Paradigm or Competition Between Contemporary Research Programs?Frederic Holmes - 2000 - Isis 91:735-753.
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  • Discipline and Bounding: The History and Sociology of Science as Seen Through the Externalism-Internalism Debate.Steven Shapin - 1992 - History of Science 30 (90):333-369.
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  • The Advancement of Science: Science Without Legend, Objectivity Without Illusions.John Dupre & Philip Kitcher - 1995 - Philosophical Review 104 (1):147.
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  • Leviathan and the Air-Pump: Hobbes, Boyle, and the Experimental Life.Richard C. Jennings - 1988 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 39 (3):403-410.
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  • The Nature of Mathematical Knowledge.Donald Gillies - 1985 - Philosophical Quarterly 35 (138):104-107.
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  • From Phlogiston to Caloric: Chemical Ontologies. [REVIEW]Mi Gyung Kim - 2011 - Foundations of Chemistry 13 (3):201-222.
    The ‘triumph of the anti-phlogistians’ is a familiar story to the historians and philosophers of science who characterize the Chemical Revolution as a broad conceptual shift. The apparent “incommensurability” of the paradigms across the revolutionary divide has caused much anxiety. Chemists could identify phlogiston and oxygen, however, only with different sets of instrumental practices, theoretical schemes, and philosophical commitments. In addition, the substantive counterpart to phlogiston in the new chemistry was not oxygen, but caloric. By focusing on the changing visions (...)
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  • Introduction: The Pluralist Stance.Stephen H. Kellert, Helen Longino & C. Kenneth Waters - 2006 - In Stephen H. Kellert, Helen Longino & C. Kenneth Waters (eds.), Scientific Pluralism. Minneapolis, MN: University of Minnesota Press.
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  • Richard Kirwan, an Irish Chemist of the Eighteenth Century.J. Reilly & N. O'flynn - 1930 - Isis 13:298-319.
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  • Crucial Experiments: Priestley and Lavoisier.S. E. Toulmin - 1957 - Journal of the History of Ideas 18 (2):205.
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  • Priestley Memorial Lecture: A Practical Perspective on Joseph Priestley as a Pneumatic Chemist.Maurice Crosland - 1983 - British Journal for the History of Science 16 (3):223-238.
    Two major problems in understanding Joseph Priestley are that he wrote so much and over such a wide area. The nineteenth-century edition of his collected works fills 25 volumes—and that leaves out the science! In discussing a man like Priestley, therefore, one cannot hope in a single lecture to do justice to the wide range of his interests or even to summarise adequately his many contributions to science. Fortunately much of the scientific work is fairly well known, for example his (...)
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  • Origin of the Concept Chemical Compound.Ursula Klein - 1994 - Science in Context 7 (2):163-204.
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  • The ‘Absolute Existence’ of Phlogiston: The Losing Party's Point of View.Victor D. Boantza & Ofer Gal - 2011 - British Journal for the History of Science 44 (3):317-342.
    Long after its alleged demise, phlogiston was still presented, discussed and defended by leading chemists. Even some of the leading proponents of the new chemistry admitted its ‘absolute existence’. We demonstrate that what was defended under the title ‘phlogiston’ was no longer a particular hypothesis about combustion and respiration. Rather, it was a set of ontological and epistemological assumptions and the empirical practices associated with them. Lavoisier's gravimetric reduction, in the eyes of the phlogistians, annihilated the autonomy of chemistry together (...)
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  • A Revolution That Never Happened.Ursula Klein - 2015 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 49:80-90.
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  • Madame Lavoisier Et la Traduction Française de l'Essay on Phlogiston de Kirwan / Madame Lavoisier and the French Translation of Kirwan's Essay on Phlogiston.Keiko Kawashima - 2000 - Revue d'Histoire des Sciences 53 (2):235-264.
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  • Priestley's Questions: An Historiographic Survey.Simon Schaffer - 1984 - History of Science 22 (2):151-183.
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  • Rereading Priestley: Science at the Intersection of Theology and Politics.Dan Eshet - 2001 - History of Science 39 (2):127-159.
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  • Hasok Chang: Is Water H 2 O? Evidence, Pluralism and Realism, Boston Studies in the Philosophy of Science.Alan Chalmers - 2013 - Science & Education 22 (4):913-920.
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  • The "Revolution in Chemistry and Physics": Overthrow of a Reigning Paradigm or Competition Between Contemporary Research Programs?Frederic L. Holmes - 2000 - Isis 91 (4):735-753.
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  • The Advancement of Science: Science Without Legend, Objectivity Without Illusions.Philip Kitcher - 1994 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 45 (3):929-932.
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  • The Hidden History of Phlogiston: How Philosophical Failure Can Generate Historiographical Refinement.Hasok Chang - 2010 - Hyle 16 (2):47 - 79.
    Historians often feel that standard philosophical doctrines about the nature and development of science are not adequate for representing the real history of science. However, when philosophers of science fail to make sense of certain historical events, it is also possible that there is something wrong with the standard historical descriptions of those events, precluding any sensible explanation. If so, philosophical failure can be useful as a guide for improving historiography, and this constitutes a significant mode of productive interaction between (...)
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  • The Reality of Phlogiston in Great Britain.John Stewart - 2012 - Hyle 18 (2):175 - 194.
    Mi Gyung Kim (2008) has challenged the historiographical assumption that phlogiston was the paradigmatic concept in eighteenth century chemistry. Her analysis of the operational, theoretical, and philosophical identities of phlogiston demonstrates how Stahlian phlogiston was appropriated into the burgeoning field of affinity theory. However, this new French conception of phlogiston was destabilized by the introduction of Boerhaave's thermometrics. By extending this story through 1790, I will show that British pneumatic chemists integrated new understandings of heat with an affinity based operational (...)
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  • The 'Instrumental' Reality of Phlogiston.Mi Gyung Kim - 2008 - Hyle 14 (1):27 - 51.
    The stability of phlogiston in eighteenth-century French chemistry depended not on its role as a comprehensive theory, but on its operational (instrumental), theoretical, and philosophical (speculative) identities that were forged in different contexts, yet were interwoven to designate a single substance. It was as 'real' as any other chemical substance to the degree that it was obtained through material operations, occupied a place in the theoretical edifice of the affinity table, and was endowed with a corpuscular ontology. Lavoisier labeled it (...)
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  • Mediations: Enlightenment Balancing Acts, or the Technologies of Rationalism.M. Norton Wise - 1993 - In Paul Horwich (ed.), World Changes. Thomas Kuhn and the Nature of Science. MIT Press. pp. 207--256.
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