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  1. A Theory of Justice.John Rawls - unknown
    Though the revised edition of A Theory of Justice, published in 1999, is the definitive statement of Rawls's view, so much of the extensive literature on Rawls's theory refers to the first edition.
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  • Freedom as Antipower.Philip Pettit - 1996 - Ethics 106 (3):576-604.
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  • Republicanism: A Theory of Freedom and Government.Erin Kelly & Philip Pettit - 1999 - Philosophical Review 108 (1):90.
    In his most recent book, Philip Pettit presents and defends a “republican” political philosophy that stems from a tradition that includes Cicero, Machiavelli, James Harrington, Locke, Montesquieu, Rousseau, and Madison. The book provides an interpretation of what is distinctive about republicanism—namely, Pettit claims, its notion of freedom as nondomination. He sketches the history of this notion, and he argues that it entails a unique justification of certain political arrangements and the virtues of citizenship that would make those arrangements possible. Of (...)
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  • Contractualism and Utilitarianism.Thomas M. Scanlon - 1982 - In Amartya Kumar Sen & Bernard Arthur Owen Williams (eds.), Utilitarianism and Beyond. Cambridge University Press. pp. 103--128.
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  • Not Just Deserts: A Republican Theory of Criminal Justice.Nicola Lacey, John Braithwaite & Philip Pettit - 1991 - Philosophical Quarterly 41 (164):374.
    A new approach to sentencing Not Just Deserts inaugurates a radical shift in the research agenda of criminology. The authors attack currently fashionable retributivist theories of punishment, arguing that the criminal justice system is so integrated that sentencing policy has to be considered in the system-wide context. They offer a comprehensive theory of criminal justice which draws on a philosophical view of the good and the right, and which points the way to practical intervention in the real world of incremental (...)
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  • Justice as Impartiality.Brian Barry - 1995 - Philosophy 70 (274):603-605.
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