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  1. Plural and conflicting values.Michael Stocker - 1989 - New York: Oxford University Press.
    Plural and conflicting values are often held to be conceptually problematic, threatening the very possibility of ethics, or at least rational ethics. Rejecting this view, Stocker first demonstrates why it is so important to understand the issues raised by plural and conflicting values, focusing on Aristotle's treatment of them. He then shows that plurality and conflict are commonplace and generally unproblematic features of our everyday choice and action, and that they do allow for a sound and rational ethics.
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  • Aristotle's theory of the will.Anthony Kenny - 1979 - New Haven: Yale University Press.
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  • Sungnōmē in Aristotle.Carissa Phillips-Garrett - 2017 - Apeiron 50 (3):311-333.
    Aristotle claims that in some extenuating circumstances, the correct response to the wrongdoer is sungnōmē rather than blame. Sungnōmē has a wide spectrum of meanings that include aspects of sympathy, pity, fellow-feeling, pardon, and excuse, but the dominant interpretation among scholars takes Aristotle’s meaning to correspond most closely to forgiveness. Thus, it is commonly held that the virtuous Aristotelian agent ought to forgive wrongdoers in specific extenuating circumstances. Against the more popular forgiveness interpretation, I begin by defending a positive account (...)
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  • Aristotle on Well-Being and Intellectual Contemplation.David Charles - 1999 - Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 73:205-242.
    [David Charles] Aristotle, it appears, sometimes identifies well-being with one activity, sometimes with several, including ethical virtue. I argue that this appearance is misleading. In the Nicomachean Ethics, intellectual contemplation is the central case of human well-being, but is not identical with it. Ethically virtuous activity is included in human well-being because it is an analogue of intellectual contemplation. This structure allows Aristotle to hold that while ethically virtuous activity is valuable in its own right, the best life available for (...)
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  • Ethics with Aristotle.Sarah Broadie - 1991 - New York: Oxford University Press.
    In this incisive study Sarah Broadie gives an argued account of the main topics of Aristotle's ethics: eudaimonia, virtue, voluntary agency, practical reason, akrasia, pleasure, and the ethical status of theoria. She explores the sense of "eudaimonia," probes Aristotle's division of the soul and its virtues, and traces the ambiguities in "voluntary." Fresh light is shed on his comparison of practical wisdom with other kinds of knowledge, and a realistic account is developed of Aristototelian deliberation. The concept of pleasure as (...)
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  • Reason and responsibility in Aristotle.Terence H. Irwin - 1980 - In Amélie Rorty (ed.), Essays on Aristotle’s Ethics. University of California Press. pp. 117--155.
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  • Aristotle on the Human Good.Richard Kraut - 1989 - Princeton University Press.
    Aristotle's Nicomachean Ethics, which equates the ultimate end of human life with happiness, is thought by many readers to argue that this highest goal consists in the largest possible aggregate of intrinsic goods. Richard Kraut proposes instead that Aristotle identifies happiness with only one type of good: excellent activity of the rational soul. In defense of this reading, Kraut discusses Aristotle's attempt to organize all human goods into a single structure, so that each subordinate end is desirable for the sake (...)
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  • Human Nature and Intellectualism in Aristotle.Jennifer Whiting - 1986 - Archiv für Geschichte der Philosophie 68 (1):70-95.
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  • Aristotle on Nature, Human Nature and Human Understanding.Mor Segev - 2017 - Rhizomata 5 (2):177-209.
    Name der Zeitschrift: Rhizomata Jahrgang: 5 Heft: 2 Seiten: 177-209.
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  • Aristotle On Well-Being And Intellectual Contemplation: Dominic Scott.Dominic Scott - 1999 - Supplement to the Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 73 (1):225-242.
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  • Aristotle on well-being and intellectual contemplation: Dominic Scott.Dominic Scott - 1999 - Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 73 (1):225–242.
    [David Charles] Aristotle, it appears, sometimes identifies well-being with one activity, sometimes with several, including ethical virtue. I argue that this appearance is misleading. In the Nicomachean Ethics, intellectual contemplation is the central case of human well-being, but is not identical with it. Ethically virtuous activity is included in human well-being because it is an analogue of intellectual contemplation. This structure allows Aristotle to hold that while ethically virtuous activity is valuable in its own right, the best life available for (...)
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  • Why involuntary actions are painful.Susan Sauvé - 1989 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 27 (S1):127-158.
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  • Degrees of Virtue in the Nicomachean Ethics.Doug Reed - 2017 - Ancient Philosophy 37 (1):91-112.
    I argue that Aristotle believes that virtue comes in degrees. After dispatching with initial concerns for the view, I argue that we should accept it because Aristotle conceives of heroic virtue as the highest degree of virtue. I support this interpretation of heroic virtue by considering and rejecting alternative readings, then showing that heroic virtue characterized as the highest degree of virtue is consistent with the doctrine of the mean.
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  • The Fragility of Goodness.Martha Nussbaum - 1986 - Journal of Philosophy 85 (7):376-383.
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  • Divine Activity and Human Life.Jakub Jirsa - 2017 - Rhizomata 5 (2):210-238.
    The following article is a contribution to the rich debate concerning happiness or fulfilment (eudaimonia) in Aristotle’s Nicomachean Ethics. It argues that eudaimonia is theōria in accordance with what Aristotle repeatedly says in Book X of the Nicomachean Ethics. However, happy life (eudaimōn bios) is a complex way of life which includes not only theoretical activity but also the exercising of other virtues including the so-called moral or social ones. The article shows that Aristotle differentiates between eudaimonia on the one (...)
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  • Aristotle: The Desire to Understand.Jonathan Lear - 1988 - New York: Cambridge University Press.
    This is a 1988 philosophical introduction to Aristotle, and Professor Lear starts where Aristotle himself starts. The first sentence of the Metaphysics states that all human beings by their nature desire to know. But what is it for us to be animated by this desire in this world? What is it for a creature to have a nature; what is our human nature; what must the world be like to be intelligible; and what must we be like to understand it (...)
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  • The Eudemian Ethics.A. Kenny (ed.) - 2011 - Oxford University Press.
    The Eudemian Ethics is a major treatise on moral philosophy whose central concern is what makes life worth living. This is the first time it has been published in its entirety in any modern language. Anthony Kenny's fine translation is accompanied by a lucid introduction and explanatory notes.
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  • The Virtues of Aristotle’s Ethics.Paula Gottlieb - 2009 - Cambridge University Press.
    While Aristotle's account of the happy life continues to receive attention, many of his claims about virtue of character seem so puzzling that modern philosophers have often discarded them, or have reworked them to fit more familiar theories that do not make virtue of character central. In this book, Paula Gottlieb takes a fresh look at Aristotle's claims, particularly the much-maligned doctrine of the mean. She shows how they form a thought-provoking ethic of virtue, one that deserves to be developed (...)
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  • Moral dilemmas.Terrance McConnell - 2010 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
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  • Aristotle on the Human Good.Richard KRAUT - 1989 - Ethics 101 (2):382-391.
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  • Aristotelian responsibility.John M. Cooper - 2013 - Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy 45:265.
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  • Aristotle on the Human Good.Richard KRAUT - 1989 - Philosophy 66 (256):246-247.
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  • Aristotle’s Theory of the Will.Anthony Kenny - 1979 - Philosophy 56 (215):120-124.
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  • Aristotle on Necessity and Voluntariness.Dennis Klimchuk - 2002 - History of Philosophy Quarterly 19 (1):1 - 19.
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  • Aristotle on Human Lives and Human Nature.Nathan Colaner - 2012 - History of Philosophy Quarterly 29 (3).
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