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  1. In Defense of Bacon.Alan Soble - 1995 - Philosophy of the Social Sciences 25 (2):192-215.
    Feminist science critics, in particular Sandra Harding, Carolyn Merchant, and Evelyn Fox Keller, claim that misogynous sexual metaphors played an important role in the rise of modern science. The writings of Francis Bacon have been singled out as an especially egregious instance of the use of misogynous metaphors in scientific philosophy. This paper offers a defense of Bacon.
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  • Francis Bacon, Feminist Historiography, and the Dominion of Nature.Brian Vickers - 2008 - Journal of the History of Ideas 69 (1):117-141.
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  • Francis Bacon: Discovery and the Art of Discourse.Lisa Jardine - 1974 - Cambridge University Press.
    Dr Jardine finds a unifying principle in Bacon's preoccupation with 'method', the evaluation and organisation of information as a procedure of investigation or ...
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  • Francis Bacon's Idea of Science and the Maker's Knowledge Tradition.Antonio PÉREZ-RAMOS - 1988 - Oxford University Press.
    This work provides an original account of Francis Bacon's conception of natural inquiry. P'erez-Ramos sets Bacon in an epistemological tradition that postulates an intimate relation between objects of cognition and objects of construction, and regards the human knower as, fundamentally, a maker. By exploring the background to this tradition, and contrasting the responses of major philosophers of the 17th century with Bacon's own, the book charts Bacon's contribution to the modern philosophy of science.
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  • Francis Bacon's Instauratio: Dominion of and Over Humanity.Charles Whitney - 1989 - Journal of the History of Ideas 50 (3):371-390.
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  • Feminist Criticisms of Metaphors in Bacon's Philosophy of Science.Iddo Landau - 1998 - Philosophy 73 (1):47-61.
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  • Brian Vickers on Alchemy and the Occult: A Response.William R. Newman - 2009 - Perspectives on Science 17 (4):pp. 482-506.
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  • Francis Bacon, Natalis Comes and the Mythological Tradition.Barbara Carman Garner - 1970 - Journal of the Warburg and Courtauld Institutes 33:264-291.
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  • Bacon and "Knowledge Broken": Limits for Scientific Method.Michael Hattaway - 1978 - Journal of the History of Ideas 39 (2):183.
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  • Francis Bacon and Alchemy: The Reformation of Vulcan.Stanton J. Linden - 1974 - Journal of the History of Ideas 35 (4):547.
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  • Francis Bacon's Instauratio: Dominion of and Over Humanity.Charles Whitney - 1989 - Journal of the History of Ideas 50 (3):371.
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  • Echoes of Nature in Salomon's House.J. Peter Zetterberg - 1982 - Journal of the History of Ideas 43 (2):179.
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  • Francis Bacon: Freedom, Authority and Science.Silvia Manzo - 2006 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 14 (2):245 – 273.
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  • Francis Bacon and the Rhetoric of Nature.John C. Briggs - 1995 - Philosophy and Rhetoric 28 (2):153-156.
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  • Baconian Science: A Hermaphroditic Birth.Evelyn Fox Keller - 1980 - Philosophical Forum 11 (3):299.
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  • The Classic Deities in Bacon.Charles William Lemmi - 1933 - New York: Octagon Books.
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  • Theology and Science in the Thought of Francis Bacon.Steven Matthews - 2008 - Ashgate.
    Breaking with a Puritan past -- A mother's concern -- Turmoil and diversity in the English Reformation -- The influences and the options available in English -- Reformation theology -- Intellectual trends : patristics and hebrew -- Millennialism and the belief in a providential age -- Bacon's break with the godly -- Bacon's turn toward the ancient faith -- The formative years -- Bacon and Andrewes -- The Meditationes sacrae and Bacon's turn away from calvinism -- Bacon's confession of faith (...)
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  • The Death of Nature.Carolyn Merchant - forthcoming - Environmental Philosophy: From Animal Rights to Radical Ecology.
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  • The English Paracelsians.Allen G. Debus - 1970 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 21 (3):304-305.
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  • Francis Bacon and the Rhetoric of Nature.John C. Briggs - 1989 - Harvard University Press.
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  • Whose Science? Whose Knowledge?Sandra Harding - 1991 - Cornell University Press.
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  • Francis Bacon, Natural Philosophy, and the Cultivation of the Mind.Peter Harrison - 2012 - Perspectives on Science 20 (2):139-158.
    This paper suggests that Bacon offers an Augustinian (rather than a purely Stoic) model of the “culture of the mind.” He applies this conception to natural philosophy in an original way, and his novel application is informed by two related theological concerns. First, the Fall narrative provides a connection between the cultivation of the mind and the cultivation of the earth, both of which are seen as restorative of an original condition. Second, the fruit of the cultivation of the mind (...)
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