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  1. By Their Properties, Causes and Effects: Newton's Scholium on Time, Space, Place and Motion—II. The Context.Robert Rynasiewicz - 1991 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 26 (2):295-321.
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  • J. B. Van Helmont's de Tempore as an Influence on Isaac Newton's Doctrine of Absolute Time.Steffen Ducheyne - 2008 - Archiv für Geschichte der Philosophie 90 (2):216-228.
    Here, I shall argue that Van Helmont needs to be added to the list of sources on which Newton drew when formulating his doctrine of absolute time. This by no means implies that Van Helmont is the factual source of Newton's views on absolute time (I have found no clear-cut evidence in support of this claim). It is by no means my aim to debunk the importance of the other sources, but rather to broaden them. Different authors help to explain (...)
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  • A Dialogue with Descartes: Newton's Ontology of True and Immutable Natures.J. E. McGuire - 2007 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 45 (1):103-125.
    : This article is concerned with Newton's appropriation of Descartes' ontology of true and immutable natures in developing his theory of infinitely extended space. It contends that unless the part played by the Platonic distinction between "being a nature" and "having a nature" in Newton's thinking is properly appreciated the foundation of his doctrine of space in relation to God will not be fully understood. It also contends that Newton's Platonism is consistent with his empiricism once the mediating role is (...)
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  • Space, Time, and Spacetime.Lawrence Sklar - 1974 - University of California Press.
    In this book, Lawrence Sklar demonstrates the interdependence of science and philosophy by examining a number of crucial problems on the nature of space and ...
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  • Descartes’s Dilemma of Eminent Containment.Geoffrey Gorham - 2003 - Dialogue 42 (1):3-.
    In his recent survey of the “dialectic of creation” in seventeenth-century philosophy, Thomas Lennon has suggested that Descartes’s assumptions about causality encourage a kind of “pantheistic emanationism”. Lennon notes that Descartes regularly invokes the principle that there is nothing in the effect which was not previously present, either formally or eminently, in the cause. Descartes also believes that God is the continuous, total, and efficient cause of everything. From these assumptions it should follow that everything that exists in the created (...)
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  • Concepts of Space: The History of Theories of Space in Physics.MAX JAMMER - 1954 - Dover Publications.
    Newly updated study surveys concept of space from standpoint of historical development. Space in antiquity, Judeo-Christian ideas about space, Newton’s concept of absolute space, space from 18th century to present. Extensive new chapter (6) reviews changes in philosophy of space since publication of second edition (1969). Numerous original quotations and bibliographical references. "...admirably compact and swiftly paced style."—Philosophy of Science. Foreword by Albert Einstein. Bibliography.
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  • Theology and the Scientific Imagination From the Middle Ages to the Seventeenth Century.Amos Funkenstein - 1986 - Princeton University Press.
    This pioneering work in the history of science, which originated in a series of three Gauss Seminars given at Princeton University in 1984, demonstrated how the roots of the scientific revolution lay in medieval scholasticism.
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  • From the Closed World to the Infinite Universe.Alexandre Koyré - 1957 - New York: Harper.
    Alexandre Koyré. of the fixed stars is infinite commit a contradiction in adjecto. In truth, an infinite body cannot be comprehended by thought. For the concepts of the mind concerning the infinite are either about the meaning oftheterm "infinite,"  ...
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  • Saving Newton's Text: Documents, Readers, and the Ways of the World.Robert Palter - 1986 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 18 (4):385.
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  • The Foundations of Newton's Philosophy of Nature.Richard S. Westfall - 1962 - British Journal for the History of Science 1 (2):171-182.
    Taking Isaac Newton at his own word, historians have long agreed that the decade of the 1660s, when Newton was a young man in his twenties, was the critical period in his scientific career. In the years 1665 and 1666, he has told us, he hit on the ideas of cosmic gravitation, the composition of white light, and the fluxional calculus. The elaboration of these basic ideas constituted his scientific achievement. Nevertheless, the decade of the 1660s has remained a virtual (...)
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  • Patrizi's De Spacio.Benjamin Brickman - 1943 - Journal of the History of Ideas 4 (1/4):224.
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  • Newton on Place, Time, and God: An Unpublished Source.J. E. McGuire - 1978 - British Journal for the History of Science 11 (2):114-129.
    Manuscript Add. 3965, section 13, folios 541r–542r and 545r–546r is in the Portsmouth Collection of manuscripts and housed in the University Library, Cambridge. These drafts contain a careful account, in Newton's hand, of his views on place, time, and God. They are part of a large number of drafts relating to the three official editions of the Principia published in Newton's lifetime.
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  • By Their Properties, Causes and Effects: Newton's Scholium on Time, Space, Place and Motion—I. The Text.Robert Rynasiewicz - 1995 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 26 (1):133-153.
    As I have read the scholium, it divides into three main parts, not including the introductory paragraph. The first consists of paragraphs one to four in which Newton sets out his characterizations of absolute and relative time, space, place, and motion. Although some justificatory material is included here, notably in paragraph three, the second part is reserved for the business of justifying the characterizations he has presented. The main object is to adduce grounds for believing that the absolute quantities are (...)
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  • Space, Atoms and Mathematical Divisibility in Newton.Andrew Janiak - 2000 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 31 (2):203-230.
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  • Henry More's Space and the Spirit of Nature.Michael Boylan - 1980 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 18 (4):395-405.
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  • Criticism in the History of Science: Newton on Absolute Space, Time, and Motion, II.Stephen Toulmin - 1959 - Philosophical Review 68 (2):203-227.
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  • Newton as Philosopher.Andrew Janiak - 2008 - Cambridge University Press.
    Newton's philosophical views are unique and uniquely difficult to categorise. In the course of a long career from the early 1670s until his death in 1727, he articulated profound responses to Cartesian natural philosophy and to the prevailing mechanical philosophy of his day. Newton as Philosopher presents Newton as an original and sophisticated contributor to natural philosophy, one who engaged with the principal ideas of his most important predecessor, René Descartes, and of his most influential critic, G. W. Leibniz. Unlike (...)
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  • Jewish Theologies of Space in the Scientific Revolution: Henry More, Joseph Raphson, Isaac Newton and Their Predecessors.Brian P. Copenhaver - 1980 - Annals of Science 37 (5):489-548.
    (1980). Jewish theologies of space in the scientific revolution: Henry More, Joseph Raphson, Isaac Newton and their predecessors. Annals of Science: Vol. 37, No. 5, pp. 489-548.
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  • Existence, Actuality and Necessity: Newton on Space and Time.J. E. McGuire - 1978 - Annals of Science 35 (5):463-508.
    This study considers Newton's views on space and time with respect to some important ontologies of substance in his period. Specifically, it deals in a philosophico-historical manner with his conception of substance, attribute, existence, to actuality and necessity. I show how Newton links these “features” of things to his conception of God's existence with respect of infinite space and time. Moreover, I argue that his ontology of space and time cannot be understood without fully appreciating how it relates to the (...)
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  • Understanding Space-Time: The Philosophical Development of Physics From Newton to Einstein.Robert DiSalle - 2006 - Cambridge University Press.
    Presenting the history of space-time physics, from Newton to Einstein, as a philosophical development DiSalle reflects our increasing understanding of the connections between ideas of space and time and our physical knowledge. He suggests that philosophy's greatest impact on physics has come about, less by the influence of philosophical hypotheses, than by the philosophical analysis of concepts of space, time and motion, and the roles they play in our assumptions about physical objects and physical measurements. This way of thinking leads (...)
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  • Newton's Scholium Generale: The Platonic and Stoic Legacy — Philo, Justus Lipsius and the Cambridge Platonists.Rudolf De Smet & Karin Verelst - 2001 - History of Science 39 (1):1-30.
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  • Concepts of Space.Max Jammer - 1969 - Cambridge: Mass., Harvard University Press.
    Historical surveys of the concept of space considers Judeo-Christian ideas about space, Newton's concept of absolute space, space from 18th century to the ...
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  • The Cambridge History of Seventeenth-Century Philosophy.Daniel Garber & Michael Ayers (eds.) - 1998 - Cambridge University Press.
    The Cambridge History of 17th Century Philosophy offers a uniquely comprehensive and authoritative overview of early-modern philosophy written by an international team of specialists. As with previous Cambridge histories of philosophy the subject is treated by topic and theme, and since history does not come packaged in neat bundles, the subject is also treated with great temporal flexibility, incorporating frequent reference to medieval and Renaissance ideas. The basic structure of the volumes corresponds to the way an educated seventeenth - century (...)
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  • The Cambridge Companion to Newton.Howard Stein - 2002 - Cambridge University Press.
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  • Newtonian Studies.[author unknown] - 1967 - Philosophy 42 (159):88-90.
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  • Newtonian Space-Time.Howard Stein - 1967 - Texas Quarterly 10:174--200.
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  • Newton on Space and Time: Comments on JE McGuire.John Carriero - 1990 - In Phillip Bricker & R. I. G. Hughes (eds.), Philosophical Perspectives on Newtonian Science. MIT Press. pp. 109--134.
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  • Predicates of Pure Existence: Newton on God's Space and Time.James E. McGuire - 1990 - In Phillip Bricker & R. I. G. Hughes (eds.), Philosophical Perspectives on Newtonian Science. MIT Press. pp. 91--108.
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  • Newton's Metaphysics.Howard Stein - 2002 - In The Cambridge Companion to Newton. Cambridge University Press. pp. 256--307.
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  • Recent Books and Periodicals Received.Benjamin Brickman - 1943 - Journal of the History of Ideas 4 (1/4):246.
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  • The Metaphysical Foundations of Modern Science.Edwin A. Burtt - 1954 - Dover Publications.
    To the medieval thinker, man was the center of creation and all of nature existed purely for his benefit. The shift from the philosophy of the Middle Ages to the modern view of humanity's less central place in the universe ranks as the greatest revolution in the history of Western thought, and this classic in the philosophy of science describes and analyzes how the profound change occurred. A fascinating analysis of the works of Copernicus, Kepler, Galileo, Descartes, Hobbes, Gilbert, Boyle, (...)
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  • Criticism in the History of Science: Newton on Absolute Space, Time, and Motion, I.Stephen Toulmin - 1959 - Philosophical Review 68 (1):1-29.
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  • Much Ado About Nothing: Theories of Space and Vacuum From the Middle Ages to the Scientific Revolution.Edward Grant - 1981 - Cambridge University Press.
    The primary objective of this study is to provide a description of the major ideas about void space within and beyond the world that were formulated between the fourteenth and early eighteenth centuries. The second part of the book - on infinite, extracosmic void space - is of special significance. The significance of Professor Grant's account is twofold: it provides the first comprehensive and detailed description of the scholastic Aristotelian arguments for and against the existence of void space; and it (...)
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  • J. B. Van Helmont's.Steffen Ducheyne - 2008 - Archiv für Geschichte der Philosophie 90 (2):216-228.
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  • Newton and the Leibniz--Clarke Correspondence.Alexandre Koyré & I. Bernard Cohen - 1962 - Archives Internationales d'Historie des Sciences 15:63--126.
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  • The Fate of the Date: The Theology of Newton's Principia Revised.J. E. McGuire - 2000 - In Margaret J. Osler (ed.), Rethinking the Scientific Revolution. Cambridge University Press. pp. 271--96.
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  • Newton's Philosophical Analysis of Space and Time.Robert DiSalle - 2002 - In I. Bernard Cohen & George E. Smith (eds.), The Cambridge Companion to Newton. Cambridge University Press. pp. 33--56.
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