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  1. Descartes’ debt to Teresa of Ávila, or why we should work on women in the history of philosophy.Christia Mercer - 2017 - Philosophical Studies 174 (10):2539-2555.
    Despite what you have heard over the years, the famous evil deceiver argument in Meditation One is not original to Descartes. Early modern meditators often struggle with deceptive demons. The author of the Meditations is merely giving a new spin to a common rhetorical device. Equally surprising is the fact that Descartes’ epistemological rendering of the demon trope is probably inspired by a Spanish nun, Teresa of Ávila, whose works have been ignored by historians of philosophy, although they were a (...)
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  2. The methodology of the Meditations: tradition and innovation.Christia Mercer - 2014 - In David Cunning (ed.), The Cambridge Companion to Descartes’ Meditations. New York: Cambridge University Press. pp. 23-47.
    Descartes intended to revolutionize seventeenth-century philosophy and science. But first he had to persuade his contemporaries of the truth of his ideas. Of all his publications, Meditations on First Philosophy is methodologically the most ingenuous. Its goal is to provoke readers, even recalcitrant ones, to discover the principles of “first philosophy.” The means to its goal is a reconfiguration of traditional methodological strategies. The aim of this chapter is to display the methodological strategy of the Meditations. The text’s method is (...)
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  3. The Vitality and Importance of Early Modern Aristotelianism.Christia Mercer - 1993 - In Tom Sorell (ed.), The Rise of modern philosophy: the tension between the new and traditional philosophies from Machiavelli to Leibniz. New York: Oxford University Press.
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  4. Knowledge and Suffering in Early Modern Philosophy: G.W. Leibniz and Anne Conway.Christia Mercer - 2012 - In Sabrina Ebbersmeyer (ed.), Emotional Minds: The Passions and the Limits of Pure Inquiry in Early Modern Philosophy. Boston: De Gruyter. pp. 179.
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  5. Metaphysics: The Early Period to the Discourse on Metaphysics.Christia Mercer & Robert C. Sleigh Jr - 1994 - Leibniz.
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  6. Platonism in Early Modern Natural Philosophy: The Case of Leibniz and Conway.Christia Mercer - 2012 - In Christoph Horn James Wilberding (ed.), Neoplatonic Natural Philosophy. Oxford University Press.
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  7. Prefacing the Theodicy.Christia Mercer - 2014 - In Larry M. Jorgensen & Samuel Newlands (eds.), New Essays on Leibniz’s Theodicy. Oxford: Oxford University Press. pp. 13-42.
    The Preface to Leibniz's famous Theodicy offers a perspective on the work that has been insufficiently studied. In this paper, I ask that we step back from the main text of the Theodicy and attend to its Preface. I show that the latter performs two crucial preparatory tasks that have not been properly appreciated. The first is to offer a public declaration of what I call Leibniz’s radical rationalism. The Preface assumes that any attentive rational being is capable of divine (...)
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  8. Leibniz and His Master: The Correspondence with Thomasius.Christia Mercer - 2004 - In Paul Lodge (ed.), Leibniz and His Correspondents. Cambridge, UK ;: Cambridge University Press.
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  9. Humanist Platonism in Seventeenth-Century Germany.Christia Mercer - 1999 - London Studies in the History of Philosophy 1:238-58.
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  10. Leibniz and Spinoza on Substance and Mode.Christia Mercer - 1999 - In Derk Pereboom (ed.), Rationalists. Rowman & Littlefield. pp. 273-300.
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  11. Leibniz on Knowledge and God.Christia Mercer - 2002 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 76 (4):531-550.
    Scholars have long noted that, for Leibniz, the attributes or Ideas of God are the ultimate objects of human knowledge. In this paper, I go beyond these discussions to analyze Leibniz’s views about the nature and limitations of such knowledge. As with so many other aspects of his thought, Leibniz’s position on this issue—what I will call his divine epistemology—is both radical and conservative. It is also not what we might expect, given other tenets of his system. For Leibniz, “God (...)
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  12. The Platonism at the Core of Leibniz's Metaphysics: God and Knowledge.Christia Mercer - 2008 - In Douglas Hedley & Sarah Hutton (eds.), Platonism and the Origins of Modernity: The Platonic Tradition and the Rise of Modern Philosophy. Springer.
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  13. Mechanizing Aristotle: Leibniz and Reformed Philosophy.Christia Mercer - 1999 - Oxford Studies in the History of Philosophy:117-152.
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  14. Platonism and Philosophical Humanism on the Continent.Christia Mercer - 2002 - In Steven M. Nadler (ed.), A Companion to Early Modern Philosophy. Malden, Mass.: Wiley-Blackwell. pp. 25–44.
    This chapter contains section titled: Historical Background Early Modern Eclecticism and Philosophical Humanism Early Modern Platonism Conclusion.
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  15. Leibniz's Teachers: Their Eclecticism and Platonism.Christia Mercer - 2009 - In Mark Kulstad, Mogens Laerke & David Snyder (eds.), The philosophy of the young Leibniz. Stuttgart: Steiner.
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  16. Leibniz and Sleigh on Substantial Unity.Christia Mercer - 2005 - In Donald Rutherford & J. A. Cover (eds.), Leibniz: nature and freedom. New York: Oxford University Press.
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  17. Material Difficulties.Christia Mercer - 2005 - Graduate Faculty Philosophy Journal 26 (2):123-135.
    When Bruno was burned at the stake in 1600, philosophers were still inclined to offer natural explanations in Aristotelian terms. Neither the physical proposals of Bruno himself, nor those of other prominent non-Aristotelians like Paracelsus had diminished the power of the explanatory model offered by the scholastics. For those philosophers watching the demise of Bruno in the Campo dei Fiori in Rome, the burning of the wood and its subsequent effects would have been explained adequately in terms of matter and (...)
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  18. The Aristotelianism at the Core of Leibniz's Philosophy.Christia Mercer - 2002 - In C. H. Leijenhorst J. M. M. H. Thijssen & C. H. Lüthy (eds.), The Dynamics of Aristotelian Natural Philosophy from Antiquity to the Seventeenth Century. Brill Academic Publisher.
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  19.  39
    Leibniz's De-partitioning of the Soul.Christia Mercer - 2012 - In Dominik Perler Klaus Corcilius (ed.), Partitioning the Soul in Ancient, Medieval and Early Modern Philosophy. Oxford University Press.
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