Results for 'Jewish'

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  1. Jewish Survival, Divine Supervision, and the Existence of God.Moti Mizrahi - 2012 - Shofar: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Jewish Studies 30 (4):100-112.
    In this paper, I discuss an argument for the existence of God known as “The Argument from the Survival of the Jews.” This argument has the form of an Inference to the Best Explanation (IBE). It proceeds from the phenomenon of Jewish survival to the existence of God as the best explanation for this phenomenon. I will argue that, even if we grant that Jewish survival is a remarkable occurrence that demands an explanation, and even if we gloss (...)
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  2. Ancient Wisdom and the Modern Temper. On the Role of Greek Philosophy and the Jewish Tradition in Hans Jonas’s Philosophical Anthropology.Fabio Fossa - 2017 - Philosophical Readings 9 (1):55-60.
    The question on the essence of man and his relationship to nature is certainly one of the most important themes in the philosophy of Hans Jonas. One of the ways by which Jonas approaches the issue consists in a comparison between the contemporary interpretation of man and forms of wisdom such as those conveyed by ancient Greek philosophy and the Jewish tradition. The reconstruction and discussion of these frameworks play a fundamental role in Jonas’s critique of the modern mind. (...)
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  3.  86
    Jewish Law, Techno-Ethics, and Autonomous Weapon Systems: Ethical-Halakhic Perspectives.Nadav S. Berman - 2020 - Jewish Law Association Studies 29:91-124.
    Techno-ethics is the area in the philosophy of technology which deals with emerging robotic and digital AI technologies. In the last decade, a new techno-ethical challenge has emerged: Autonomous Weapon Systems (AWS), defensive and offensive (the article deals only with the latter). Such AI-operated lethal machines of various forms (aerial, marine, continental) raise substantial ethical concerns. Interestingly, the topic of AWS was almost not treated in Jewish law and its research. This article thus proposes an introductory ethical-halakhic perspective on (...)
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  4.  84
    Jewish Philosophy as a Guide to Life. [REVIEW]Yiftach Fehige - 2009 - European Journal for Philosophy of Religion 1 (2):139-143.
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  5. Teleology in Jewish Philosophy: Early Talmudists Till Spinoza.Yitzhak Melamed - 2020 - In Jeffrey McDonough (ed.), Teleology: A History. New York, NY, USA: Oxford University Press. pp. 123-149.
    Medieval and early modern Jewish philosophers developed their thinking in conversation with various bodies of literature. The influence of ancient Greek – primarily Aristotle (and pseudo-Aristotle) – and Arabic sources was fundamental for the very constitution of medieval Jewish philosophical discourse. Toward the late Middle Ages Jewish philosophers also established a critical dialogue with Christian scholastics. Next to these philosophical corpora, Jewish philosophers drew significantly upon Rabbinic sources (Talmud and the numerous Midrashim) and the Hebrew Bible. (...)
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  6. Correspondences in Jewish Mysticism/Kabbalah and Hindu Mysticism/Vedanta-Advaita.Robert Waxman PhD - manuscript
    Many similarities and correspondences are found in Jewish mysticism (Kabbalah) and Hindu mysticism (Vedanta-Advaita). In both traditions, the ultimate goal is to experience communion with a Divine Source. To reach this level of transcendence, each system speaks of an individualized soul with three characteristics that merge with a Godhead. Through deep meditative practices, the soul experiences a divine influx of the Infinite. The Hindu Upanishads and the Jewish Zohar speak of similar methodologies for achieving a mystical experience. Vedantin (...)
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  7.  87
    Jewish Themes in Spinoza's Philosophy (Review).Yisrael Yehoshua Melamed - 2003 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 41 (3):417-418.
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  8.  97
    Toward Jewish-Christian Reconciliation: Some Theological Reflections.Richard Oxenberg - 2009 - Interreligous Insight 7 (4).
    Both Christianity and Judaism have their basis in the Torah, the five central books of the Hebrew Bible that culminate in the revelation at Sinai. This very commonality, potentiality a source of mutual respect and concord, has played itself out, in the two thousand years since the advent of Christianity, in a disastrous rivalry of interpretation. Christians have interpreted their own religion in such a manner as to disallow the separate legitimacy of Judaism. Jews, in response, have often adopted an (...)
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  9.  64
    Jewishness in Philosophy.Luca Bertolino & Vladimir Belov - 2020 - RUDN Journal of Philosophy 24 (3):321-327.
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  10. Jewish Teachings of Mankind and God in the Book of Genesis 1-3.Stephen C. Sanders - manuscript
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  11. Human Reproductive Cloning: Science, Jewish Law and Metaphysics.Barbara Pfeffer Billauer - forthcoming - ssrn.com.
    Abstract: Under traditional Jewish Law (halacha), assessment of human reproductive cloning (HRC) has been formulated along four lines of inquiry, which I discussed in Part I of this paper. Therein I also analyze five relevant doctrines of Talmudic Law, concluding that under with a risk-benefit analysis HRC fails to fulfill the obligation ‘to be fruitful and multiply’ and should be strictly prohibited. Here, I review of the topic from an exigetical Biblical and Kabbalistic perspective, beginning with exploring comments of (...)
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  12.  43
    Is There a Jewish Theology or Not?Steven Maimes - 2013
    Nearly half of the modern Jews do not believe in God. They have no Jewish theology and perhaps have lost the essence of Judaism for lack of faith. For the Jewish believers in God, Jewish theology is alive and can and should be discussed more often.
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  13. Hillel and Confucius: The Prescriptive Formulation of the Golden Rule in the Jewish and Chinese Confucian Ethical Traditions.Robert Elliott Allinson - 2003 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 3 (1):29-41.
    In this article, the Golden Rule, a central ethical value to both Judaism and Confucianism, is evaluated in its prescriptive and proscriptive sentential formulations. Contrary to the positively worded, prescriptive formulation – “Love others as oneself” – the prohibitive formulation, which forms the injunction, “Do not harm others, as one would not harm oneself,” is shown to be the more prevalent Judaic and Confucian presentation of the Golden Rule. After establishing this point, the remainder of the article is dedicated to (...)
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  14.  38
    Review Of: J. Diamond, Jewish Theology Unbound. [REVIEW]Kenneth Seeskin - 2019 - European Journal for Philosophy of Religion 11 (3):236-239.
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  15. Kafka's Jewish Languages: The Hidden Openness of Tradition.David Suchoff - 2007 - Journal of Jewish Thought and Philosophy 15 (2):65-132.
    This essay connects Kafka's German and his Jewish linguistic sources, and explores the trans-national perspective on literary tradition they helped him create. I begin with a critique of Deleuze and Guattari's view of Kafka as a minority writer, showing how their cold war nationalism scants the positive contributions that Yiddish and Hebrew made to his work. I continue with an examination of the "twilight of containment," when this postcontemporary Kafka began to break through his cold war canonization after 1989. (...)
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  16. Studies in Medieval Jewish History and Literature.Isadore Twersky (ed.) - 1979 - Harvard University Press.
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  17.  46
    20th Century Jewish Thought and Classical American Pragmatism: New Perspectives on Hayyim Hirschensohn, Mordecai M. Kaplan and Eliezer Berkovits.Nadav Berman Shifman - 2018 - Dissertation, Hebrew University of Jerusalem
    Please see the extended abstract in the attached file.
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  18.  54
    Review of Jewish Philosophy in an Analytic Age. [REVIEW]David-Hillel Ruben - 2019 - Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2019.
    A collection of 18 contemporary essays engaged in original, not historical, philosophical research on philosophical themes arising from Judaism.
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  19. Hilary Putnam. Jewish Philosophy as a Guide to Life: Rosenzweig, Buber, Lévinas, Wittgenstein. Indiana University Press, 2008.Fehige Yiftach - 2009 - European Journal for Philosophy of Religion 1 (2):139--143.
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  20.  23
    'Not My People': Jewish-Christian Ethics and Divine Reversals in Response to Injustice.Joshua Blanchard - 2019 - In Kevin Timpe & Blake Hereth (eds.), The Lost Sheep in Philosophy of Religion: New Perspectives on Disability, Gender, Race, and Animals. New York, USA: Routledge. pp. 120-137.
    In the Hebrew Scriptures, there are familiar consequences for disobedience to God—destruction of holy sites, slavery, exile, and death. But there is one consequence that is less familiar and of special interest in this chapter. Disobedience to God sometimes results in stark reversals in God’s very relationship and experiential availability to God’s own people. Such people may even remove God’s very presence. This is a curious form of punishment that threatens the very spiritual identity of the victims of the reversal. (...)
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  21.  49
    Nietzsche's Jewish Problem: Between Anti-Semitism and Anti-Judaism by Robert C. Holub. (Review). [REVIEW]James Mollison - 2016 - Shofar 34:102-105.
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  22.  53
    A ‘Most Astonishing’ Circumstance: The Survival of Jewish POWs in German War Captivity During the Second World War.Johanna Jacques - 2021 - Social and Legal Studies 30 (3):362-383.
    During the Second World War, more than 60,000 Jewish members of the American, British and French armed forces became prisoners of war in Germany. Against all expectations, these prisoners were treated in accordance with the 1929 Geneva Convention, and the majority made it home alive. This article seeks to explain this most astonishing circumstance. It begins by collating the references to the experiences of Western Jewish POWs from the historical literature to provide a hitherto-unseen overview of their treatment (...)
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  23. THEORETICAL APPROACHES IN THE STUDY OF JEWISH MYSTICISM: NEW PERSPECTIVE.Stepan Lisy - 2018 - Communio Viatorum 60 (3): 276-312.
    According to Thomas S. Kuhn what changes with the transition to maturity of discipline is not the presence of a paradigm but rather its nature. The purpose of this study is to analyse a nature of paradigm in the study of Jewish mysticism. In the present article I attempt to show, that the discipline shares many characteristic features of the schools of pre-paradigm period caused by the absence of a pre-established theory. Despite the fact we are able to observe (...)
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  24. On the way to the Christian-Jewish dialogue (based on the materials published in “Kyiv Theological Academy Studies” journal (1860–1917)).Vadym Menzhulin - 2018 - Наукові Записки Наукма. Філософія Та Релігієзнавство 1:65-78.
    “Beilis affair” (1911–1913) is one of the most resonate events in Kyiv of the early 20 th century. It was a subject of a huge number of investigations. However, a special analysis of the role that the members of Kyiv Theological Academy community played in this affair has not been made yet. Facts and data available require further reflections and deeper interpretations. For this, both a time span and a thematic content should be expanded. Thus, the author tries to reveal (...)
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  25. Philosophical Ruminations About Embryo Experimentation with Reference to Reproductive Technologies in Jewish “Halakhah”.Piyali Mitra - 2017 - IAFOR Journal of Ethics, Religion and Philosophy 3 (2):5-19.
    The use of modern medical technologies and interventions involves ethical and legal dilemmas which are yet to be solved. For the religious Jews the answer lies in Halakhah. The objective of this paper is to unscramble the difficult conundrum possessed by the halakhalic standing concerning the use of human embryonic cell for research. It also aims to take contemporary ethical issues arising from the use of technologies and medical advances made in human reproduction and study them from an abstract philosophical (...)
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  26. Maimonides and the Pre-Maimonidean Jewish Philosophical Tradition According to Hermann Cohen.Aaron W. Hughes - 2010 - Journal of Jewish Thought and Philosophy 18 (1):1-26.
    This paper examines Hermann Cohen's idiosyncratic construction of a medieval Jewish philosophical tradition, focusing primarily, though not exclusively, on his Charakteristik der Ethik Maimunis . This construction, not unlike modern accounts, is filtered through the central place of Maimonides. For Cohen, however, Maimonides' centrality is defined not by his systematization of Aristotelianism, but by his elevation of ethics over metaphysics. The ethical and pantheistic concerns of Maimonides' precursors, according to this reading, anticipate his uniqueness. Whereas Shlomo ibn Gabirol's pantheistic (...)
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  27. Waiting for the Messiah: A Jewish-Buddhist Reflection on Fiddler on the Roof.Richard Oxenberg - manuscript
    In this brief essay I reflect upon the character of Jewish spirituality through a meditation on the themes of tradition, love, and loss as they appear in the Broadway musical Fiddler on the Roof.
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  28. Critical Whiteness Studies and the “Jewish Problem”.Balázs Berkovits - 2018 - Zeitschrift für Kritische Sozialtheorie Und Philosophie 5 (1):86-102.
    Name der Zeitschrift: Zeitschrift für kritische Sozialtheorie und Philosophie Jahrgang: 5 Heft: 1 Seiten: 86-102.
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  29.  49
    Eliezer Schweid: Some Premises of a Pragmatic Jewish Thinker.Nadav S. Berman - 2020 - In The Philosophy of Eliezer Schweid: Jewish Culture and Universal Perspectives, ed. Yehoyada Amir and Joseph Turner. Jerusalem: pp. 103-141.
    This book-chapter briefs Eliezer Schweid's thought, and demonstrates the role of some core-concepts of classical American pragmatism within it.
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  30. Russian Women Emigrees in Psychology: Informal Jewish Networks.R. Woodward William - 2011 - History of Psychology 13:111-137.
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  31.  34
    Derrida, Jacques. I. Derrida and Jewishness.D. Newheiser - 2013 - In D. Allison, V. Leppin, C. Seow, H. Spieckermann, B. D. Walfish & E. Ziolkowski (eds.), The Encyclopedia of the Bible and its Reception, Volume 6. Berlin: Walter de Gruyter.
    Dictionary entry on Jacques Derrida's relation to Judaism.
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  32. Philosophy in the Middle Ages: The Christian, Islamic, and Jewish Traditions (3rd Ed.). [REVIEW]Seamus O’Neill - 2011 - Teaching Philosophy 34 (4):439-444.
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  33. Heschel, Hiddenness, and the God of Israel.Joshua Blanchard - 2016 - European Journal for Philosophy of Religion 8 (4):109-124.
    Drawing on the writings of the Jewish thinker, Abraham Joshua Heschel, I defend a partial response to the problem of divine hiddenness. A Jewish approach to divine love includes the thought that God desires meaningful relationship not only with individual persons, but also with communities of persons. In combination with John Schellenberg’s account of divine love, the admission of God’s desire for such relationships makes possible that a person may fail to believe that God exists not because of (...)
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  34. On Place and Space: The Ontology of the Eruv.Barry Smith - 2007 - In Christian Kanzian (ed.), Cultures: Conflict – Analysis – Dialogue. Ontos. pp. 403-416.
    ‘Eruv’ is a Hebrew word meaning literally ‘mixture’ or ‘mingling’. An eruv is an urban region demarcated within a larger urban region by means of a boundary made up of telephone wires or similar markers. Through the creation of the eruv, the smaller region is turned symbolically (halachically = according to Jewish law) into a private domain. So long as they remain within the boundaries of the eruv, Orthodox Jews may engage in activities that would otherwise be prohibited on (...)
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  35. Judaic Logic: A Formal Analysis of Biblical, Talmudic and Rabbinic Logic.Avi Sion - 1995, 1997 - Geneva, Switzerland: Slatkine; CreateSpace & Kindle; Lulu..
    Judaic Logic is an original inquiry into the forms of thought determining Jewish law and belief, from the impartial perspective of a logician. Judaic Logic attempts to honestly estimate the extent to which the logic employed within Judaism fits into the general norms, and whether it has any contributions to make to them. The author ranges far and wide in Jewish lore, finding clear evidence of both inductive and deductive reasoning in the Torah and other books of the (...)
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  36. Sacrifice and Repentance as Self-Restraint. Hans Jonas’ Ethics for a Technological Epoch.Roberto Franzini Tibaldeo - 2011 - Toronto Journal of Jewish Thought 3.
    The present article tries to analyze the role played in Hans Jonas’ ethical reflection by religious—namely, Jewish—tradition. Jonas goes in search of an ultimate foundation for his ethics and his theory of the good in order to face the challenges currently posed by technology’s nihilistic attitude towards life and ethics. Jonas’ ethical investigation enters into the domain of metaphysics, which offers an incomparable contribution to the philosophical endeavour, without undermining its overall independence. In this way, Jewish categories—such as (...)
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  37. A Moral Argument Against Absolute Authority of the Torah.Dan Baras - forthcoming - Sophia:1-23.
    In this article, I will argue against the Orthodox Jewish view that the Torah should be treated as an absolute authority. I begin with an explanation of what it means to treat something as an absolute authority. I then review examples of norms in the Torah that seem clearly immoral. Next, I explore reasons that people may have for accepting a person, text, or tradition as an absolute authority in general. I argue that none of these reasons can justify (...)
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  38. Mishpat Ivri, Halakhah and Legal Philosophy: Agunah and the Theory of “Legal Sources".Bernard S. Jackson - 2001 - JSiJ.
    In this paper, I ask whether mishpat ivri (Jewish Law) is appropriately conceived as a “legal system”. I review Menachem Elon’s use of a “Sources” Theory of Law (based on Salmond) in his account of Mishpat Ivri; the status of religious law from the viewpoint of jurisprudence itself (Bentham, Austin and Kelsen); then the use of sources (and the approach to “dogmatic error”) by halakhic authorities in discussing the problems of the agunah (“chained wife”), which I suggest points to (...)
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  39. “The Rejection of Radical-Foundationalism and -Skepticism: Pragmatic Belief in God in Eliezer Berkovits’s Thought”.Nadav Berman, S. - 2019 - Journal of the Goldstein-Goren International Center for Jewish Thought 1 (2019):201-246.
    Faith has many aspects. One of them is whether absolute logical proof for God’s existence is a prerequisite for the proper establishment and individual acceptance of a religious system. The treatment of this question, examined here in the Jewish context of Rabbi Prof. Eliezer Berkovits, has been strongly influenced in the modern era by the radical foundationalism and radical skepticism of Descartes, who rooted in the Western mind the notion that religion and religious issues are “all or nothing” questions. (...)
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  40.  85
    David Patterson, Anti-Semitism and Its Metaphysical Origins (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2015). [REVIEW]Frederic Tremblay - 2017 - European Journal of Jewish Studies 11 (2):203-209.
    This is a critical review of David Patterson's book Anti-Semitism and Its Metaphysical Origins (2015). In this review, I present the author's new explanation of the roots of anti-Semitism, which he finds in the anti-Semite's desire to become like God himself. Patterson's explanation makes an anti-Semite of all those who partake in the "Western rationalist project," especially philosophers (including Jewish philosophers such as Spinoza, Hermann Cohen, and Marx), but also Islamists and anti-Zionist Jews. I criticize Patterson on two fronts: (...)
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  41.  82
    Early Christian Ethics.Sarah Catherine Byers - 2017 - In Sacha Golob & Jens Timmermann (eds.), The Cambridge History of Moral Philosophy. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press. pp. 112-124.
    G.E.M. Anscombe famously claimed that ‘the Hebrew-Christian ethic’ differs from consequentialist theories in its ability to ground the claim that killing the innocent is intrinsically wrong. According to Anscombe, this is owing to its legal character, rooted in the divine decrees of the Torah. Divine decrees confer a particular moral sense of ‘ought’ by which this and other act-types can be ‘wrong’ regardless of their consequences, she maintained. There is, of course, a potentially devastating counter-example. Within the Torah, Abraham is (...)
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  42.  75
    Идолопоклонство неотделимо от человека: Мендельсон, Коген, Кассирер. Katsur - 2018 - Judaica Petropolitana 9:44-64.
    Текст Десяти заповедей Библии предписывает поклоняться только единому Богу и запрещает создавать изображения Бога и изваяния. Цель данной статьи исследовать взгляды Мендельсона, Когена и Кассирера на связь между предписанием поклоняться единому Богу и запретом идолопоклонства в иудаизме. В статье рассматривается вопрос, почему Мендельсон и Коген определяют запрет на изображение Бога как запрет, характеризующий сущность иудаизма как религии разума. Анализируя понятие знака, Мендельсон объясняет поклонение идолам как непонимание указывающей функции знака; подобное непонимание ведет к ошибочному восприятию. Коген раскрывает с помощью этого (...)
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  43. Patient Autonomy in Talmudic Context: The Patient’s ‘‘I Must Eat’’ on Yom Kippur in the Light of Contemporary Bioethics.Zackary Berger & Joshua Cahan - 2016 - Journal of Religion and Health 5 (5):5.
    In contemporary bioethics, the autonomy of the patient has assumed considerable importance. Progressing from a more limited notion of informed consent, shared decision making calls upon patients to voice the desires and preferences of their authentic self, engaging in choice among alternatives as a way to exercise deeply held values. One influential opinion in Jewish bioethics holds that Jewish law, in contradistinction to secular bioethics, limits the patient's exercise of autonomy only in those instances in which treatment choices (...)
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  44. The Embryo in Ancient Rabbinic Literature: Between Religious Law and Didactic Narratives: An Interpretive Essay.Etienne Lepicard - 2010 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 32 (1):21-41.
    At a time when bioethical issues are at the top of public and political agendas, there is a renewed interest in representations of the embryo in various religious traditions. One of the major traditions that have contributed to Western representations of the embryo is the Jewish tradition. This tradition poses some difficulties that may deter scholars, but also presents some invaluable advantages. These derive from two components, the search for limits and narrativity, both of which are directly connected with (...)
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  45. PRELIMINARY REMARKS FOR THE COMPARATIVE STUDY OF MYSTICISM: MYSTICISM IS WHAT UNIO MYSTICA IS.Stepan Lisy - 2012 - Communio Viatorum 54 (1):88-107.
    In the present article I argue, that our understanding of mysticism in general has its origin in Christian-theological framework. If some scholars are able to decide whether there is one or more mysticisms, there has to be a common understanding of mysticism (referential term). But every scholar gives a different definition, and even scholars dealing with mysticism in the same religious tradition. Sure, any definition can help us to find a referential term to which all scholars dealing with mysticism refer (...)
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  46. On the Value of Faith and Faithfulness.Daniel McKaughan - 2017 - International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 81 (1-2):7-29.
    There was a time when Greco-Roman culture recognized faith as an indispensable social good. More recently, however, the value of faith has been called into question, particularly in connection with religious commitment. What, if anything, is valuable about faith—in the context of ordinary human relations or as a distinctive stance people might take in relation to God? I approach this question by examining the role that faith talk played both in ancient Jewish and Christian communities and in the larger (...)
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  47. Nothing Else.Samuel Lebens - 2019 - European Journal for Philosophy of Religion 11 (2):91-110.
    "Jewish Nothing-elsism" is the school of thought according to which there is nothing else besides God. This school is sometimes and erroneously interpreted as pantheistic or acosmic. In this paper I argue that Jewish Nothing-elsism is better interpreted as a form of “panentheistic priority holism”, and still better interpreted as a form of “idealistic priority monism”. On this final interpretation, Jewish Nothing-elsism is neither pantheist, panentheist, nor acosmic. Jewish Nothing-elsism is Hassidic idealism, and nothing else. Moreover, (...)
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  48. A Short History of Food Ethics.Hub Zwart - 2000 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 12 (2):113-126.
    Moral concern with food intake is as old asmorality itself. In the course of history, however,several ways of critically examining practices of foodproduction and food intake have been developed.Whereas ancient Greek food ethics concentrated on theproblem of temperance, and ancient Jewish ethics onthe distinction between legitimate and illicit foodproducts, early Christian morality simply refused toattach any moral significance to food intake. Yet,during the middle ages food became one of theprinciple objects of monastic programs for moralexercise (askesis). During the seventeenth (...)
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  49.  86
    A ‘Grooming Chamber’ For Antisemitism.Jan M. Van der Molen - Jan 28, 2020 - University of Groningen.
    If Jewish Bolsheviks could put an end to the imperial rule of the Romanovs, could they pose a threat to the vision of a Third Reigh? A question the German National Socialists are likely to have asked themselves before and on the eve of plotting the rise of the Nazi regime. After all, Europe had had a long-standing relationship with blaming the Jews for the world’s miseries. A relationship Germany was ready to refuel, as indicated by German Field Marshal (...)
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  50. The Enigma of Spinoza's Amor Dei Intellectualis.Yitzhak Melamed - 2019 - In Noa Naaman-Zaudrer & Noa Naaman (eds.), Freedom, Action and Motivation in Spinoza’s Ethics. Routledge. pp. 222-238.
    The notion of divine love was essential to medieval Christian conceptions of God. Jewish thinkers, though, had a much more ambivalent attitude about this issue. While Maimonides was reluctant to ascribe love, or any other affect, to God, Gersonides and Crescas celebrated God’s love. Though Spinoza is clearly sympathetic to Maimonides’ rejection of divine love as anthropomorphism, he attributes love to God nevertheless, unfolding his notion of amor Dei intellectualis at the conclusion of his Ethics. But is this a (...)
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  51. Nothing found.