Results for 'Joke Meheus'

65 found
Order:
  1.  73
    In the Thick of Things.Spuybroek Lars, Joke Brouwer & Sjoerd van Tuinen - 2016 - In Joke Brouwer, Lars Spuybroek & Sjoerd van Tuinen (eds.), The War of Appearances: Transparency, Opacity, Radiance. V2_Publishing. pp. 6-11.
    Short introduction to the V2 publication of "The War of Appearances: Transparency, Opacity, Radiance" (2016). An anthology with Matteo Pasquinelli, Luciana Parisi, Graham Harman, Tomas Saraceno, René ten Bos, Tim Morton, and many others.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  2. What Makes a Joke Bad: Enthymemes and the Pragmatics of Humor.Michael K. Cundall & Fabrizio Macagno - 2023 - The Philosophy of Humor Yearbook 4 (1):111-129.
    Bad jokes are not simply non-humorous texts. They are texts that are humorous for someone––their author at least––but not for their audience. Bad jokes thus involve a contextual––pragmatic––dimension that is neglected in the semantic theories of humor. In this paper, we propose an approach to humor based on the Aristotelian notion of surprising enthymemes. Jokes are analyzed as kinds of arguments, whose tacit dimension can be retrieved and justified by considering the “logic” on which it is based. However, jokes are (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  3.  60
    Noesis and Logos in Plato's Statesman, with a Focus on the Visitor's Jokes at 266a-d.Mitchell Miller - 2017 - In John Sallis (ed.), Plato's Statesman: Dialectic, Myth, and Politics. Albany, NY: Suny Series in Contemporary Company. pp. 107-136.
    In his “Noesis and Logos in the Eleatic Trilogy, with a Focus on the Visitor’s Jokes at Statesman 266a-d,” Mitchell Miller explores the interplay of intuition and discourse in the Statesman. He prepares by considering the orienting provocations provided by Socrates’ refutations of the proposed definition of knowledge — namely, “true judgment and a logos” — in the closing pages of the Theaetetus, by the Eleatic Visitor’s obscure schematization at Sophist 253d-e of the kinds of eidetic field discerned by dialectic, (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  4. Is Laughing at Morally Oppressive Jokes Like Being Disgusted by Phony Dog Feces? An Analysis of Belief and Alief in the Context of Questionable Humor.Chris A. Kramer - 2022 - The Philosophy of Humor Yearbook 3 (1):179-207.
    In two very influential papers from 2008, Tamar Gendler introduced the concept of “alief” to describe the mental state one is in when acting in ways contrary to their consciously professed beliefs. For example, if asked to eat what they know is fudge, but shaped into the form of dog feces, they will hesitate, and behave in a manner that would be consistent with the belief that the fudge is really poop. They alieve that it is disgusting, while they believe (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  5. Getting It: On Jokes and Art.Steven Burns & Alice MacLachlan - 2004 - AE: Journal of the Canadian Society of Aesthetics 10.
    “What is appreciation?” is a basic question in the philosophy of art, and the analogy between appreciating a work of art and getting a joke can help us answer it. We first propose a subjective account of aesthetic appreciation (I). Then we consider jokes (II). The difference between getting a joke and not, or what it is to get it right, can often be objectively articulated. Such explanations cannot substitute for the joke itself, and indeed may undermine (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  6.  55
    Is it okay to be offended by a joke?Ankit Kapoor - 2021 - Dissertation, Birla Institute of Technology and Science (Bits)
    We live in a world that witnesses an ongoing war between an entitled audience and, for the purposes of this paper, comedians who are too afraid to be vocal in their acts. There is no better time to try and understand the journey of humor- how it has fared in history and how people have reacted to it over time. This paper focuses on the philosophical implications of a joke by trying to break down the concept of humor to (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  7. Life's Joke: Bergson, Comedy, and the Meaning of Laughter.Russell Ford - 2018 - In Lydia L. Moland (ed.), All Too Human: Laughter, Humor, and Comedy in Nineteenth-Century Philosophy. Cham: Springer. pp. 175-193.
    The present essay argues that Bergson’s account of the comic can only be fully appreciated when read in conjunction with his later metaphysical exposition of the élan vital in Creative Evolution and then by the account of fabulation that Bergson only elaborates fully three decades later in The Two Sources of Morality and Religion. The more substantive account of the élan vital ultimately shows that, in Laughter, Bergson misses his own point: laughter does not simply serve as a means for (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  8.  50
    Rationale of the Mathematical Joke.Andrew Aberdein - 2010 - In Alison Pease, Markus Guhe & Alan Smaill (eds.), Proceedings of AISB 2010 Symposium on Mathematical Practice and Cognition. AISB. pp. 1-6.
    A widely circulated list of spurious proof types may help to clarify our understanding of informal mathematical reasoning. An account in terms of argumentation schemes is proposed.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  9. Just saying, just kidding : liability for accountability-avoiding speech in ordinary conversation, politics and law.Elisabeth Camp - 2022 - In Laurence R. Horn (ed.), From lying to perjury: linguistic and legal perspective on lies and other falsehoods. Boston: De Gruyter Mouton. pp. 227-258.
    Mobsters and others engaged in risky forms of social coordination and coercion often communicate by saying something that is overtly innocuous but transmits another message ‘off record’. In both ordinary conversation and political discourse, insinuation and other forms of indirection, like joking, offer significant protection from liability. However, they do not confer blanket immunity: speakers can be held to account for an ‘off record’ message, if the only reasonable interpreta- tions of their utterance involve a commitment to it. Legal liability (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  10. The subtleties of fit: reassessing the fit-value biconditionals.Rachel Achs & Oded Na’Aman - 2023 - Philosophical Studies 180 (9):2523-2546.
    A joke is amusing if and only if it’s fitting to be amused by it; an act is regrettable if and only if it’s fitting to regret it. Many philosophers accept these biconditionals and hold that analogous ones obtain between a wide range of additional evaluative properties and the fittingness of corresponding responses. Call these the _fit–value biconditionals_. The biconditionals give us a systematic way of recognizing the role of fit in our ethical practices; they also serve as the (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  11.  86
    Metaphors and Other “Abnormalities”.Danilo Suster - 2019 - In Bojan Borstner, Onič Tomaž & Zupan Simon (eds.), From Language to Philosophy and Back. Od jezika k filozofiji in nazaj: Festschrift ob 75-letnici Dunje Jutronić. Univerzitetna založba Univerze v Mariboru. pp. 185-202.
    Metaphorical statements surprise us as literal falsehoods, but the interpretation reveals a special motive for the figurative use of the language. Donald Davidson objects to nonliteral meaning: “to suppose a metaphor can be effective only by conveying a coded message is like thinking a joke or a dream makes some statement which a clever interpreter can restate in plain prose.” Taking this remark as my starting point I analyze interpretative strategies for metaphors, jokes, riddles and counterfactual conditionals – all (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  12. In Defense of Comic Pluralism.Nathaniel Sharadin - 2017 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 20 (2):375-392.
    Jokes are sometimes morally objectionable, and sometimes they are not. What’s the relationship between a joke’s being morally objectionable and its being funny? Philosophers’ answers to this question run the gamut. In this paper I present a new argument for the view that the negative moral value of a joke can affect its comedic value both positively and negatively.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  13.  73
    Weighing the evidence in evolutionary biology. [REVIEW]Massimo Pigliucci - 2008 - Trends in Ecology and Evolution 23 (12):662-663.
    The joke among scientists is that ‘philosopher’ is the last stage of one’s scien- tific career, to be arrived at when one can no longer get grants funded or graduate stu- dents to advise. Despite the fact that some of the greatest minds in evolutionary biology (from Darwin to Ernst Mayr) were very much interested in the philosophical aspects of what they were doing, the bad joke persists in the halls of academia.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  14. Relativism and Retraction: The Case Is Not Yet Lost.Dan Zeman - manuscript
    Many times, what we say proves to be wrong. It might turn out that what we took to be a comforting remark was, in fact, making things worse. Or that a joke was inappropriate. Or that yelling out loud was rude. More importantly for this paper, there are plenty of cases in which what we said turns out to be false: we spoke without paying attention, we were misinformed or tricked, or we made a reasoning mistake. -/- A particular (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  15. Digital self-harm: Prevalence, motivations and outcomes for teens who cyberbully themselves.Edgar Pacheco & Neil Melhuish - 2019 - Netsafe.
    This research report presents findings about the extent and nature of digital self-harm among New Zealand teens. Digital self-harm is broadly defined here as the anonymous online posting or sharing of mean or negative online content about oneself. The report centres on the prevalence of digital self-harm (or self-cyberbullying) among New Zealand teens (aged 13-17), the motivations, and outcomes related to engaging in this behaviour. The findings described in this report are representative of the teenage population of New Zealand by (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  16. Language and Legitimation.Robert Mark Simpson - 2021 - In Rebecca Mason (ed.), Hermeneutical Injustice. Routledge.
    The verb to legitimate is often used in political discourse in a way that is prima facie perplexing. To wit, it is often said that an actor legitimates a practice which is officially prohibited in the relevant context – for example, that a worker telling sexist jokes legitimates sex discrimination in the workplace. In order to clarify the meaning of statements like this, and show how they can sometimes be true and informative, we need an explanation of how something that (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  17. Scholastic Humor: Ready Wit as a Virtue in Theory and Practice.Boaz Faraday Schuman - 2022 - History of Philosophy Quarterly 39 (2):113-129.
    Scholastic philosophers can be quite funny. What’s more, they have good reason to be: Aristotle himself lists ready wit (eutrapelia) among the virtues, as a mean between excessive humor and its defect. Here, I assess Scholastic discussions of humor in theory, before turning to examples of it in practice. The last and finest of these is a joke, hitherto unacknowledged, which Aquinas makes in his famous Five Ways. Along the way, we’ll see (i) that the history of philosophy is (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  18. Continuing After Species: An Afterword.Robert A. Wilson - 2022 - In John S. Wilkins, Igor Pavlinov & Frank Zachos (eds.), Species Problems and Beyond: Contemporary Issues in Philosophy and Practice. Boca Raton: CRC Press. pp. 343-353.
    This afterword to Species and Beyond provides some reflections on species, with special attention to what I think the most significant developments have been in the thinking of biologists and philosophers working on species over the past 25 years, as well as some bad jokes.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  19. Mathematical Wit and Mathematical Cognition.Andrew Aberdein - 2013 - Topics in Cognitive Science 5 (2):231-250.
    The published works of scientists often conceal the cognitive processes that led to their results. Scholars of mathematical practice must therefore seek out less obvious sources. This article analyzes a widely circulated mathematical joke, comprising a list of spurious proof types. An account is proposed in terms of argumentation schemes: stereotypical patterns of reasoning, which may be accompanied by critical questions itemizing possible lines of defeat. It is argued that humor is associated with risky forms of inference, which are (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  20. The Argumentative “Logic” of Humor.Fabrizio Macagno & Michael Cundall - 2022 - Philosophy and Rhetoric 55 (3):223-251.
    ABSTRACT The logic of humor has been acknowledged as an essential dimension of every joke. However, what is the logic of jokes, exactly? The modern theories of humor maintain that jokes are characterized by their own logic, dubbed “pseudo,” “playful,” or “local,” which has been the object of frequent criticisms. This article intends to address the limitations of the current perspectives on the logic of jokes by proposing a rhetorical approach to humorous texts. Building on the traditional development of (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  21.  67
    Star Trek’s Stoics: The Vulcans.Steven Umbrello - 2015 - Philosophy Now 106:29.
    In 1966 Gene Roddenberry, then a relatively unknown TV writer, created what was to become a cultural sensation. From cell phones and tablets, to MRI machines and medical jet injectors, Star Trek has undoubtedly anticipated much of the technology that we take for granted today. Moreover, the disagreements, fights and jokes between Captain Kirk (William Shatner), Dr Leonard ‘Bones’ McCoy (DeForest Kelley) and Mr Spock (Leonard Nimoy) were expertly crafted for dramatic impact. But I’m not writing this to confess to (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  22. Irony about Tragedy: The Onion’s treatment of 9/11.Arsenii Khitrov - 2012 - Topos 2:153–167.
    In this paper the author analyses the materials that were published in the American satirical magazine The Onion in the period from 2006 till 2011 and mentioned September 11 terrorist attacks. The focus of the research is the persistence of 9/11 jokes five years after the tragedy occurred and later on. The jokes are classified basing on their subject-matter and rhetorical patterns. The author concludes that most of these jokes promote respect towards collective memory about the attacks and their victims.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  23.  43
    On the equality of different professions, with Salvador Dali.Terence Rajivan Edward - manuscript
    Are the leading members of different fields comparable in their achievements? Is the A-grade painter (or A* if that is your top grade) somehow equivalent to the A-grade boxer, say? I would like to think so, but there is a problematic piece of data for me, though there is a philosophical question of why it is problematic: I find some brief remarks from a certain painter as funny as the jokes of leading comedians. In the appendix, I cast doubt on (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  24. Aristotle on Wittiness.Rebekah Johnston - 2020 - Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy 24 (2):323-336.
    Aristotle claims, in his Nicomachean Ethics, that in addition to being, for example, just and courageous, and temperate, the virtuous person will also be witty. Very little sustained attention, however, has been devoted to explicating what Aristotle means when he claims that virtuous persons are witty or to justifying the plausibility of the claim that wittiness is a virtue. It becomes especially difficult to see why Aristotle thinks that being witty is a virtue once it becomes clear that Aristotle’s witty (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  25. Unfitting Absent Emotion.James Fritz - 2023 - In Russ Shafer-Landau (ed.), Oxford Studies in Metaethics Volume 18. Oxford University Press. pp. 73-96.
    The world provides us with an ocean of opportunities for fitting emotion. But we are beings with limited emotional resources, so missed opportunities are common. This chapter argues that these failures to take up fitting emotions are very frequently unfitting in their own right—so frequently, in fact, that most of us lead lives replete with unfitting absences of emotion. It begins by showing that, whenever an emotion can be unfitting in virtue of being too weak, the absence of that emotion (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  26. Escalating Linguistic Violence: From Microaggressions to Hate Speech.Emma McClure - 2019 - In Jeanine Weekes Schroer & Lauren Freeman (eds.), Microaggressions and Philosophy. New York: Taylor & Francis. pp. 121-145.
    At first glance, hate speech and microaggressions seem to have little overlap beyond being communicated verbally or in written form. Hate speech seems clearly macro-aggressive: an intentional, obviously harmful act lacking the ambiguity (and plausible deniability) of microaggressions. If we look back at historical discussions of hate speech, however, many of these assumed differences turn out to be points of similarity. The harmfulness of hate speech only became widely acknowledged after a concerted effort by critical race theorists, feminists, and other (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  27. Thomas Pynchon’s Against the Day: Adeleuzian Reading of Pynchon’s Language.Ali Salami & Razieh Rahmani - 2018 - Anafora 5 (5).
    his study explores Pynchon’s mammoth novel, Against the Day, in terms of the minor practice of language as proposed by Deleuze and Guattari in their book Kafka: Toward a Minor Literature, which opens up new possibilities for literary criticism. With his idiosyncratic, intensive, and inventive practice of language, Pynchon shatters the already existing notions of appropriate and homogenizing forms of major language. The novel demystifies the language’s institutionalized system of signification and defies identifiable decipherable meaning in many ways, such as (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  28. Success in failure: from the destruction of the tragic to the self-negation of the comic.Jack Black - 2023 - Crisis and Critique 10 (2):30--54.
    This essay explores the interrelationship between tragedy and comedy, with specific focus given to the potential that comedy can provide in transforming the most tragic of situations. In building this claim, the very dynamics and distinctions that divide the tragic from the comic are considered in view of the self-negation that the comic posits. That is, while tragedy requires a certain acceptance of the finite, from which destiny and circumstance come to certify the hero’s tragic predicament, in comedy, what succeeds (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  29. Self- Deprecation and the Habit of Laughter.Camille Atkinson - 2015 - Florida Philosophical Review 15 (1):19-36.
    My objective here is to give an account of self-deprecating humor—examining what works, what doesn't, and why—and to reflect on the significance of the audience response. More specifically, I will be focusing not only on the purpose or intention behind self-deprecating jokes, but considering how their consequences might render them successful or unsuccessful. For example, under what circumstances does self-deprecation tend to put listeners at ease, and when is this type of humor more likely to put people off? I will (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  30. Myth Rationalization in Ancient Greek Comedy.Alan Sumler - 2014 - Quaderni Urbinati di Cultura Classica 107 (2):81-100.
    Ancient Greek comedy takes interesting approaches to mythological narrative. This article analyzes one excerpt and eight fragments of ancient Greek Old, Middle, and New Comedy. It attempts to show a comic rationalizing approach to mythology. Poets analyzed include Aristophanes, Cratinus, Anaxilas, Timocles, Antiphanes, Anaxandrides, Philemon, Athenion, and Comic Papyrus. Comparisons are made to known rationalizing approaches as found in the mythographers Palaephatus and Heraclitus the Paradoxographer. Ancient comedy tends to make jokes about the ludicrous aspects of myth. Early Greek myth (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  31. Knowledge Regarding Sexual Abuse of Selected University Students of Dhaka City.Sabrina Akhter, Shafquat H. Chowdhury, Turna Mithila & Shamima Parvin Lasker - 2023 - Joj Public Health 7 (5):1-5.
    Introduction: Sexual harassment involves an assortment of coercive behaviors, including physical force, intimidation, and various forms of compulsion, including verbal harassment and forced penetration [1]. Sexual abuse can happen to both men and women. In the United Kingdom(UK), the problem of child sexual abuse (CSA) has epidemic proportions and is a global public health issue [2]. 53,874 incidents were reported under the 2012 Protection of Children from Sexual Offences Act as of 2021 [3]. to their ignorance about puberty, sexuality, and (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  32.  94
    ONT.Paul Bali - manuscript
    contents -/- ONT vol 1 i. short review: Beyond the Black Rainbow ii. as you die, hold one thought iii. short review: LA JETÉE -/- ONT vol 2 i. maya means ii. short review: SANS SOLEIL iii. vocab iv. eros has an underside v. short review: In the Mood for Love -/- ONT vol 3 i. weed weakens / compels me ii. an Ender's Game after-party iii. playroom is a realm of the dead iv. a precise german History v. short (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  33. What Could It Mean to Say That Today's Stand‐Up Audiences Are Too Sensitive?Phillip Deen - 2020 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 78 (4):501-512.
    Contemporary comedy audiences are accused by some comedians of being too morally sensitive to appreciate humor. To get closer to an idea of what this means, I will first briefly present the argument over audience sensitivity as found in the non-philosophical literature. Second, I then turn to the philosophical literature and begin from the idea that “funny” is a response-dependent property. I present a criticism of this response-dependence account of “funny” based in the claim that funniness is not de- termined (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  34. Edited Transcript of the Class (Dr. of 6-L Dg).Maxson J. McDowell, Joenine E. Roberts & Rachel McRoberts - manuscript
    (NOTE: This is a transcript of the class. FOR THE FULL PAPER please click on "Maxson J McDowell" above.) An edited transcript of an experiment performed within a class on dream interpretation. Knowing only the dreamer’s age and gender, we interpreted his dream from its text. Our interpretation included predictions about the dreamer's psychological issues, and about his defenses. It also identified a series of jokes within the dream which would tend to penetrate the dreamer's defenses. When we had finished (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  35. Complete Transcript of the Class (Dr. of 6-L Dg).Maxson J. McDowell, Joenine E. Roberts & Rachel McRoberts - manuscript
    (NOTE: This is a transcript of the class. FOR THE FULL PAPER, please click on "Maxson J. McDowell".) A complete transcript of an experiment performed within a class on dream interpretation. Knowing only the dreamers age and gender, we interpreted his dream from its text. Our interpretation included predictions about the dreamer's psychological issues, and about his defenses. It also identified a series of jokes within the dream which would tend to penetrate the dreamer's defenses. When we had finished our (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  36. What's the Deal with Standup Comedy?Alan Daboin - 2022 - In V. Vinogradovs (ed.), Aesthetic Literacy vol I: a book for everyone. Melbourne: Mont Publishing House. pp. 128-140.
    The artform of standup comedy can be seen as having much in common with the discipline of philosophy, particularly with the way philosophy is carried out or “performed,” whether professionally or otherwise. There are, for instance, certain basic similarities between how standup comedians and philosophers value ideals of clarity and precision when it comes to the issue of determining what kind of language is best to employ if one seeks to either effectively deliver a funny joke, as in the (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  37.  46
    Who says beauty and wisdom can’t go along well?Nguyen Thi Hong Hue - manuscript
    For a long time, many people have thought that one cannot have both beauty and wisdom. Therefore, many jokes have spread around about the misplacement of beauty and wisdom. Nonetheless, there’s been no logic or evidence behind the belief and jokes.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  38. Having a sense of humor as a virtue.Mark Alfano, Mandi Astola & Paula Urbanowicz - forthcoming - Journal of Value Inquiry:1-22.
    Could having a sense of humor be a virtue? In this paper, we argue for an affirmative answer to this question. Like other virtues, a sense of humor enhances and inhibits the expression of various emotions, especially amusement, contempt, trust, and hope. Someone possesses a virtuous sense of humor to the extent that they are well-disposed to appropriately enhance or inhibit these emotions in themselves and others through both embodied reactions (e.g., smiling, laughter, eyerolls) and language (e.g., telling jokes, understanding (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  39. Analysis, Hegel and the Seventh Art.Kobe Keymeulen - 2021 - Psychoanalytische Perspectieven 39 (2):217-237.
    This paper investigates the significance of filmic analysis in the contemporary theoretical paradigm inspired by Slavoj Žižek, which we term ‘Transcendental Materialism’. After characterising its distinct peculiarities within the history of psychoanalysis and film theory, we demonstrate the limitations of previous (possible) answers, arguing they are partly formulated in response to confrontations with other paradigms. Our own approach is then informed by a study of another popular object of analysis in Transcendental Materialism – the joke. We show how Freud’s (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  40.  75
    Bob, Little Jim, Bluebottle, And The Three Stooges.Stephen Davies - 2008 - Postgraduate Journal of Aesthetics 5 (1):1-6.
    Bob Solomon enjoyed humor, a good laugh. He was not a teller and collector of jokes or of humorous stories, as Ted Cohen and Noël Carroll are. He did not cultivate clever witticisms. Rather, his interest was in viewing life’s contingency and absurdity for the humor that can be found there, and the target of this humor was as likely to be himself or his friends as it was to be strangers. Bob also displayed philosophical courage. He once argued before (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  41. Adam Smith’s irony and the invisible hand.Sergio Volodia Marcello Cremaschi - 2017 - Iberian Journal of the History of Economic Thought 4 (1):43-62.
    I reconstruct Adam Smith’s theory of irony and its application. I illustrate how he defines it as a combination of something “grand” with something “mean” and how this is consistent with his anti-Cartesian and post-skeptic epistemology. I suggest that, for Smith, “systems” of any kind, from Cartesian physics to philosophical monotheism, Stoic ethics, and the “mercantile system” draw their apparent plausibility from some disease of human imagination. I argue that in every field, including political economy, in his view, the philosopher’s (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  42. Leibniz's solution to the problem of evil: Franklin Leibniz on evil.James Franklin - 2003 - Think 2 (5):97-101.
    • It would be a moral disgrace for God (if he existed) to allow the many evils in the world, in the same way it would be for a parent to allow a nursery to be infested with criminals who abused the children. • There is a contradiction in asserting all three of the propositions: God is perfectly good; God is perfectly powerful; evil exists (since if God wanted to remove the evils and could, he would). • The religious believer (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  43. Socrates Agonistes: The Case of the Cratylus Etymologies.Rachel Barney - 1998 - Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy 16:63-98.
    Are the long, wildly inventive etymologies in Plato’s Cratylus just some kind of joke, or does Plato himself accept them? This standard question misses the most important feature of the etymologies: they are a competitive performance, an agôn by Socrates in which he shows that he can play the game of etymologists like Cratylus better than they can themselves. Such show-off performances are a recurrent feature of Platonic dialogue: they include Socrates’ speeches on eros in the Phaedrus, his rhetorical (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  44.  74
    Review of Readings of Wittgenstein's On Certainty by Daniele Moyal-Sharrock ed (2007).Michael Starks - 2017
    On Certainty was not published until 1969, 18 years after Wittgenstein’s death and has only recently begun to draw serious attention. I cannot recall a single reference to it in all of Searle and one sees whole books on W with barely a mention. There are however xlnt books on it by Stroll, Svensson, McGinn and others and parts of many other books and articles, but hands down the best is that of Daniele Moyal-Sharrock (DMS) whose 2004 volume “Understanding Wittgenstein’s (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  45.  99
    Le logos du sophiste. Image et parole dans le Sophiste de Platon.Felipe Ledesma - 2009 - Elenchos: Rivista di Studi Sul Pensiero Antico 30 (2):207-254.
    The logos question, one of the most important among the subjects that traverse the Plato's Sophist, has in fact some different aspects: the criticism of father Parmenides' logos, that is unable to speak about the not-being, but also about the being; the relations between logos and its cognates, phantasia, doxa and dianoia; the logos’ complex structure, that is a compound with onoma and rema; the difference between naming and saying, two distinct but inseparable actions; the logical and ontological conditions that (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  46. The Everyday's Fabulous Beyond: Nonsense, Parable and the Ethics of the Literary in Kafka and Wittgenstein.Karen Zumhagen-Yekplé - 2013 - Comparative Literature 64 (4):429-445.
    This essay takes up the significance of Wittgenstein's philosophy for our understanding of literature (and vice versa) through a comparative reading of the stakes and aims of Kafka's and Wittgenstein's respective circa 1922 puzzle texts “Von den Gleichnissen” (“On Parables”) and the Tractatus Logico-Philosophicus. The essay builds upon the so-called resolute program of Wittgenstein interpretation developed by Cora Diamond, James Conant, and others, bringing its insights to bear on Kafka's perplexing work. The essay explores the ethical weight of these two (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  47. Utopian Social Delusions in the 21st Century.Starks Michael - 2017 - Henderson,NV, USA: Michael Starks.
    This collection of articles was written over the last 10 years and edited them to bring them up to date (2017). All the articles are about human behavior (as are all articles by anyone about anything), and so about the limitations of having a recent monkey ancestry (8 million years or much less depending on viewpoint) and manifest words and deeds within the framework of our innate psychology as presented in the table of intentionality. As famous evolutionist Richard Leakey says, (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  48. What Moral Virtues are Required to Recognize Irony?Phillip Deen - 2016 - Journal of Value Inquiry 50 (1):51-67.
    The Onion, a widely known satirical newspaper, frequently finds its articles taken as the literal truth. One article from May 2011, “Planned Parenthood Opens $8 Billion Abortionplex,” featured teenage girls gushing over the amusement park amenities like a ten-screen theater, nightclub and “lazy river” and a fake PR representative touting, “Whether she’s a high school junior who doesn’t want to go to prom pregnant, a go-getter professional who can’t be bothered with the time commitment of raising a child, or a (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  49. A philosophical critique of Feminism: From the third wave to the fourth wave.Mohammed Xolile Ntshangase - 2021 - African Journal of Gender, Society and Development 10 (2):25-40.
    Feminism has been a good movement with the noble aim of freeing the world from the shackles of an evil superiority of men over women. The principal of feminism as a movement was political equality between men and women. In itself, it was a fair and just course such that it was inclusive of men as well, men were also part of the movement with no insults, threats, and hate speech. But in this technological era some impurities have also crept (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  50.  97
    To kill a mandarin.Iddo Landau - 2005 - Philosophy and Literature 29 (1):89-96.
    IN LE P È R E GO R I O T, Balzac has the main character, Rastignac, ask his friend Bianchon whether he would agree to the killing of a Chinese Mandarin in far-away China if this would yield Bianchon a great fortune. After some joking, Bianchon answers negatively.1 For Rastignac, this thought experiment is connected to a practical dilemma: he is deliberating whether to agree that a man he has never seen, and who has done Rastignac no harm, should (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
1 — 50 / 65