Results for 'Normative Economics'

1000+ found
Order:
  1. Relational Normative Economics: An African Approach to Justice.Thaddeus Metz - 2020 - Ethical Perspectives 27 (1):35-68.
    Recent work by comparative philosophers, global ethicists, and cross-cultural value theorists indicates that, unlike most Western thinkers, those in many other parts of the globe, such as indigenous Africa, East Asia, and Latin America, tend to prize relationality. These relational values include enjoying a sense of togetherness, participating cooperatively, creating something new together, engaging in mutual aid, and being compassionate. Global economic practices and internationally influential theories pertaining to justice, development, and normative economics over the past 50 years (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  2.  92
    Relationalizing Normative Economics: Some Insights from Africa.Thaddeus Metz - 2024 - In Josef Wieland, Stefan Linder, Jessica Geraldo Schwengber & Adrian Zicari (eds.), Cooperation in Value-Creating Networks Relational Perspectives on Governing Social and Economic Value Creation in the 21st Century. Springer. pp. 167-185.
    In this chapter I systematically distinguish a variety of ways to relationalize economics, and focus on a certain approach to relationalizing normative economics in the light of communal values salient in the African philosophical tradition. I start by distinguishing four major ways to relationalize empirical economics, viz., in terms of its ontologies, methods, explanations, and predictions, and also three major ways to relationalize normative economics, in regards to means taken towards ends, decision-procedures used to (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  3. A concept of progress for normative economics.Philippe Mongin - 2006 - Economics and Philosophy 22 (1):19-54.
    The paper discusses the sense in which the changes undergone by normative economics in the twentieth century can be said to be progressive. A simple criterion is proposed to decide whether a sequence of normative theories is progressive. This criterion is put to use on the historical transition from the new welfare economics to social choice theory. The paper reconstructs this classic case, and eventually concludes that the latter theory was progressive compared with the former. It (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  4. Economic theories of democratic legitimacy and the normative role of an ideal consensus.Christopher S. King & Chris King - 2013 - Politics, Philosophy and Economics 12 (2):156-178.
    Economic theories of democratic legitimacy have criticized deliberative accounts of democratic legitimacy on the grounds that they do not represent a practical possibility and that they create conditions that make actual democracies worse. It is not simply that they represent the wrong ideal. Rather, they are too idealistic – failing to show proper regard for the cognitive and moral limitations of persons and the depth of disagreement in democratic society. This article aims to show that the minimalist criterion of democratic (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  5. Value Commitment, Resolute Choice, and the Normative Foundations of Behavioural Welfare Economics.C. Tyler DesRoches - 2020 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 37 (4):562-577.
    Given the endowment effect, the role of attention in decision-making, and the framing effect, most behavioral economists agree that it would be a mistake to accept the satisfaction of revealed preferences as the normative criterion of choice. Some have suggested that what makes agents better off is not the satisfaction of revealed preferences, but ‘true’ preferences, which may not always be observed through choice. While such preferences may appear to be an improvement over revealed preferences, some philosophers of (...) have argued that they face insurmountable epistemological, normative, and methodological challenges. This article introduces a new kind of true preference – values-based preferences – that blunts these challenges. Agents express values-based preferences when they choose in a manner that is compatible with a consumption plan grounded in a value commitment that is normative, affective, and stable for the agent who has one. Agents who choose according to their plans are resolute choosers. My claim is that while values-based preferences do not apply to every choice situation, this kind of preference provides a rigorous way for thinking about classic choice situations that have long interested behavioral economists and philosophers of economics, such as ‘Joe-in-the-cafeteria.’. (shrink)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  6. Beyond Welfare: A Preliminary Bahá’í Normative Framework for Economic Rights and Responsibilities.Vargha Bolodo-Taefi - 2021 - Journal of Bahá’Í Studies 31 (1-2):45-71.
    Invoking a broad catalog of applicable Bahá’í principles, this paper presents the conceptual and theoretical underpinnings of a Bahá’í approach to economic growth and disparity and then maps these concepts onto an applied framework of economic rights and responsibilities. The framework that emerges thus both conceptualizes the underlying virtues that govern economic prosperity in a Bahá’í model and shows how these principles might lead to normative prescriptions for economic rights and responsibilities. The paper concludes that the Bahá’í principles dealing (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  7. Mark Blaug on the Normativity of Welfare Economics.D. Wade Hands - 2013 - Erasmus Journal for Philosophy and Economics 6 (3):1-25.
    Abstract: This paper examines Mark Blaug's position on the normative character of Paretian welfare economics: in general, and specifically with respect to his debate with Pieter Hennipman over this question during the 1990s. The paper also clarifies some of the confusions that emerged within the context of this debate, and closes by providing some additional arguments supporting Blaug's position that he himself did not provide.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  8. The Ends of Economic History: Alternative Teleologies and the Ambiguities of Normative Reconstruction.Christopher Zurn - 2016 - In Hans-Christoph Schmidt am Busch (ed.), Die Philosophie des Marktes – The Philosophy of the Market. pp. 289-323.
    This paper critically evaluates institution reconstructing critique—the central methodological strategy employed by Axel Honneth in his latest book Freedom’s Right designed to articulate and justify the normative standards employed by a critical theory of the present. It begins by considering, at a general level, the promises and limits of three ideal-typical normative methodologies of social critique: first principles critique, intuition refining critique, and institution reconstructing critique. It then turns to the details of Honneth’s history and diagnosis of market (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  9. Value Judgements and Value Neutrality in Economics.Philippe Mongin - 2006 - Economica 73 (290):257-286.
    The paper analyses economic evaluations by distinguishing evaluative statements from actual value judgments. From this basis, it compares four solutions to the value neutrality problem in economics. After rebutting the strong theses about neutrality (normative economics is illegitimate) and non-neutrality (the social sciences are value-impregnated), the paper settles the case between the weak neutrality thesis (common in welfare economics) and a novel, weak non-neutrality thesis that extends the realm of normative economics more widely than (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   17 citations  
  10. Economics, Law, Humanities: Homo-what? An Introduction.Paolo Silvestri - 2019 - Teoria E Critica Della Regolazione Sociale 19 (2):7-14.
    This introduction explains the reasons behind this Special issue and discuss the organization and content of it. The difficulty of a genuine dialogue and understanding between economics, law and humanities, seems to be due not only to the fragmentation of reflections on man, but to a real ‘conflict of anthropologies’. What kind of conceptions of man and human values are presupposed by and / or privileged by economics, law, economic approaches to law and social sciences? How and when (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  11. The Normative Standard for Future Discounting.Craig Callender - 2021 - Australasian Philosophical Review 5 (3):227-253.
    This paper challenges the conventional wisdom dominating the social sciences and philosophy regarding temporal discounting, the practice of discounting the value of future utility when making decisions. Although there are sharp disagreements about temporal discounting, a kind of standard model has arisen, one that begins with a normative standard about how we should make intertemporal comparisons of utility. This standard demands that in so far as one is rational one discounts utilities at future times with an exponential discount function. (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   10 citations  
  12. The Normative and Social Dimensions of the Transition Towards a Responsible, Circular Bio-Based Economy.Vincent Blok - 2023 - In Sally Lamalle & Peter Stoett (eds.), Representations and Rights of the Environment. cambridge UP. pp. 334-350.
    In this chapter, we will first argue that current practices in CBE are framed within the market or economic logic and miss the normative dimension of the call for circularity. The transition to the CBE requires a fundamental reflection on the role of economic actors in the social and ecological environment with significant consequences for their business practices. Second, we will argue that the transition to the CBE requires the acknowledgement of the normative and social dimensions of this (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  13. The Economic Model of Forgiveness.Brandon Warmke - 2014 - Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 97 (4):570-589.
    It is sometimes claimed that forgiveness involves the cancellation of a moral debt. This way of speaking about forgiveness exploits an analogy between moral forgiveness and economic debt-cancellation. Call the view that moral forgiveness is like economic debt-cancellation the Economic Model of Forgiveness. In this article I articulate and motivate the model, defend it against some recent objections, and pose a new puzzle for this way of thinking about forgiveness.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   20 citations  
  14. Disputed (Disciplinary) Boundaries : Philosophy, Economics and Value Judgments.Paolo Silvestri - 2016 - History of Economic Ideas 24 (3):187-221.
    The paper aims to address the following two questions: what kind of discourse is that which attempt to found or defend the autonomy or the boundaries of a discipline? Why do such discourses tend to turn into normative, dogmatic-excommunicating discourses between disciplines, schools or scholars? I will argue that an adequate answer may be found if we conceive disciplines as dogmatics, where such discourses often take the form of a discourse on the foundation of a discipline, a foundation in (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  15. Decision under normative uncertainty.Franz Dietrich & Brian Jabarian - 2022 - Economics and Philosophy 38 (3):372-394.
    While ordinary decision theory focuses on empirical uncertainty, real decision-makers also face normative uncertainty: uncertainty about value itself. From a purely formal perspective, normative uncertainty is comparable to (Harsanyian or Rawlsian) identity uncertainty in the 'original position', where one's future values are unknown. A comprehensive decision theory must address twofold uncertainty -- normative and empirical. We present a simple model of twofold uncertainty, and show that the most popular decision principle -- maximising expected value (`Expectationalism') -- has (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  16. Normative Conceptions of European Identity-A Synthetic Approach.Pablo Jiménez Lobeira - 2010 - Australian Journal of Professional and Applied Ethics 12 (1).
    The European project was aimed from the outset, alongside reconciliation (peace) and economic reconstruction (prosperity), at a degree of political integration too. Political integration has progressed modestly. Not everybody is convinced of its benefits. Besides, the notion of a European polity opens the question about its sources of cohesion. Those sources are more or less evident in the member states – language, history, legal, political and religious traditions, for instance. They give, say, Latvia, Italy or Hungary a certain degree of (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  17. Empirical Research and Normative Theory – Transdisciplinary Perspectives on Two Methodical Traditions Between Separation and Interdependence.Alexander Max Bauer & Malte Meyerhuber (eds.) - 2019 - Berlin and Boston: Walter de Gruyter.
    Two questions often shape our view of the world. On the one hand, we ask what there is, on the other hand, we ask what there ought to be. Empirical research and normative theory, the methodological traditions concerned with these questions, entered a difficult relationship, from at least as early as around the time of the advent of modern sciences. To this day, there remains a strong separation between the two domains, with both tending to neglect discourses and results (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  18. Public Health and Normative Public Goods.Richard H. Dees - 2018 - Public Health Ethics 11 (1):20-26.
    Public health is concerned with increasing the health of the community at whole. Insofar as health is a ‘good’ and the community constitutes a ‘public’, public health by definition promotes a ‘public good’. But ‘public good’ has a particular and much more narrow meaning in the economics literature, and some commentators have tried to limit the scope of public health to this more narrow meaning of a ‘public good’. While such a move makes the content of public health less (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  19. Methodology and Philosophy of Economics: A Tale of Two Biases.Luis Mireles-Flores & Michiru Nagatsu - 2022 - History of Economic Thought 64 (1):33-57.
    This article comprises an up-to-date critical review of the field known as Economic Methodology or Philosophy of Economics (EM/PE). Two edited volumes (Kincaid and Ross 2021; Heilmann and Reiss 2021), a special issue of the Journal of Economic Methodology (2021), and a recent bibliometric analysis of the field (Claveau et al. 2021) constitute the basis of the review. Drawing on these sources, we identify a number of problematic trends in current EM/PE research. We claim that these trends could be (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  20. Can Normative Accounts of Discrimination Be Guided by Anti-discrimination Law? Should They?Rona Dinur - 2022 - Erasmus Journal for Philosophy and Economics 15 (2):aa–aa.
    In her recent book, Faces of Inequality (2020), Moreau aims at developing a normative account of discrimination that is guided by the main features of anti-discrimination law. The critical comment argues against this methodology, indicating that due to indeterminacy relative to their underlying normative principles, central anti-discrimination norms cannot fulfill this guiding role. Further, using the content of such norms to guide ethical discussions is likely to be misleading, as it reflects evidentiary considerations that are unique to the (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  21. Is geographical economics imperializing economic geography?Uskali Mäki & Caterina Marchionni - 2011 - Journal of Economic Geography 11 (4):645-665.
    Geographical economics (also known as the ‘new economic geography’) is an approach developed within economics dealing with space and geography, issues previously neglected by the mainstream of the discipline. Some practitioners in neighbouring fields traditionally concerned with spatial issues (descriptively) characterized it as—and (normatively) blamed it for—intellectual imperialism. We provide a nuanced analysis of the alleged imperialism of geographical economics and investigate whether the form of imperialism it allegedly instantiates is to be resisted and on what grounds. (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   8 citations  
  22.  35
    How to Identify Norms, Laws and Regulations That Facilitate Illicit Financial Flows and Related Financial Crimes.Tiago Cardao-Pito - forthcoming - Journal of Money Laundering Control.
    Purpose: Illicit financial flows are targeted by the United Nations’ (UN) Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). However, these illicit flows are not entirely understood. Furthermore, they can benefit from economic norms, laws, and regulations that lack mechanisms to detect and penalize them. This paper investigates whether a recent test, the embezzler test, can be used to identify regulatory architectures that facilitate illicit financial flows and related financial crimes. -/- Design/methodology/approach: To develop a more advanced version of the embezzler test in terms (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  23. Will Economic Globalization Result in Cultural Product Homogenization, in Theory and Practice?Todd J. Barry - 2015 - Symposion: Theoretical and Applied Inquiries in Philosophy and Social Sciences 2 (3):405-418.
    Globalization is resulting in complex decisions by businesses as to where and what to produce, while free trade is resulting in a greater menu of choices for consumers, often with the blending of products and goods from various cultures, called ‘glocalization.’ This paper reviews the theories and practices behind these current happenings, which are each economic, politicaleconomic, institutional, and sociological, first by looking at the supply side of why certain countries produce the goods that they do, and then at the (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  24. A small step towards unification of economics and physics.Subhendu Bhattacharyya - 2020 - Mind and Society 20 (1):69-84.
    Unification of natural science and social science is a centuries-old, unmitigated debate. Natural science has a chronological advantage over social science because the latter took time to include many social phenomena in its fold. History of science witnessed quite a number of efforts by social scientists to fit this discipline in a rational if not mathematical framework. On the other hand a tendency among some physicists has been observed especially since the last century to recast a number of social phenomena (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  25. The Social Construction of Legal Norms.Kirk Ludwig - 2020 - In Rachael Mellin, Raimo Tuomela & Miguel Garcia-Godinez (eds.), Social Ontology, Normativity and Law. Berlin, Germany: De Gruyter. pp. 179-208.
    Legal norms are an invention. This paper advances a proposal about what kind of invention they are. The proposal is that legal norms derive from rules which specify role functions in a legal system. Legal rules attach to agents in virtue of their status within the system in which the rules operate. The point of legal rules or a legal system is to solve to large scale coordination problems, specifically the problem of organizing social and economic life among a group (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  26. Value-free economics’ road towar Value-free economics’ road towards epistemological hubris. The use and abuse of mathematics by economists.Aleksander Ostapiuk - 2019 - Philosophical Problems in Science 67:153-202.
    The goal of the article is to substantiate that despite the criticism the paradigm in economics will not change because of the axiomatic assumptions of value-free economics. How these assumptions work is demonstrated on the example of Gary Becker’s economic approach which is analyzed from the perspective of scientific research programme. The author indicates hard core of economic approach and the protective belt which makes hard core immune from any criticism. This immunity leads economists to believe that they (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  27.  99
    Moral Grounds for Economic and Social Rights.James Nickel - 2024 - In Malcolm Langford (ed.), Oxford Handbook of Economic and Social Rights. Oxford University Press.
    This chapter considers possible moral grounds for recognizing and realizing economic and social rights (ESRs) as human rights. It begins by suggesting that ESRs fall into three families: (1) welfareoriented ESRs, which protect adequate income, education, health, and safe and healthful working conditions; (2) freedom-oriented ESRs, which prohibit slavery, ensure free choice of employment, and protect workers’ freedoms to organize and strike: and (3) fairness-oriented ESRs, which require nondiscrimination and equal opportunity in the workplace along with fair remuneration for one’s (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  28.  83
    Utopian Normativism and The Normative Foundation in Contemporary Discourse.Abdullah Beni - manuscript
    Traditional ethical frameworks have failed to address the complexities of a globalized world. This paper proposes a new approach by combining utopian normativism with the concept of the Normative Foundation. Utopian normativism challenges the notion of universal ethical principles, arguing they are shaped by societal and environmental context. The Normative Foundation, posits a foundational framework of shared ideas and values, influencing societies worldwide. This paper argues that the Normative Foundation shapes ethical norms, and utopian normativism offers a (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  29. The Mechanistic and Normative Structure of Agency.Jason Winning - 2019 - Dissertation, University of California San Diego
    I develop an interdisciplinary framework for understanding the nature of agents and agency that is compatible with recent developments in the metaphysics of science and that also does justice to the mechanistic and normative characteristics of agents and agency as they are understood in moral philosophy, social psychology, neuroscience, robotics, and economics. The framework I develop is internal perspectivalist. That is to say, it counts agents as real in a perspective-dependent way, but not in a way that depends (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  30.  91
    The Abuse of Expertise and the Problem with Public Economics.Gordon Barnes - forthcoming - Social Theory and Practice.
    In recent decades, economists have played an active role in shaping public policy by publicly recommending the adoption of certain policies. These recommendations are often based on normative assumptions that are not the product of economic analysis; nor are they shared by the laypeople to whom these recommendations are made. Inducing people to adopt public policies for reasons that are neither the product of expertise, nor shared by the people, is a form of manipulation that violates the ideals of (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  31. Research Habits in Financial Modelling: The Case of Non-normativity of Market Returns in the 1970s and the 1980s.Boudewijn De Bruin & Christian Walter - 2016 - In Ping Chen & Emiliano Ippoliti (eds.), Methods and Finance: A Unifying View on Finance, Mathematics and Philosophy. Cham: Springer. pp. 73-93.
    In this chapter, one considers finance at its very foundations, namely, at the place where assumptions are being made about the ways to measure the two key ingredients of finance: risk and return. It is well known that returns for a large class of assets display a number of stylized facts that cannot be squared with the traditional views of 1960s financial economics (normality and continuity assumptions, i.e. Brownian representation of market dynamics). Despite the empirical counterevidence, normality and continuity (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  32. The Eclipse of Value-Free Economics. The concept of multiple self versus homo economicus.Aleksander Ostapiuk - 2020 - Wrocław, Polska: Publishing House of Wroclaw University of Economics and Business.
    The books’ goal is to answer the question: Do the weaknesses of value-free economics imply the need for a paradigm shift? The author synthesizes criticisms from different perspectives (descriptive and methodological). Special attention is paid to choices over time, because in this area value-free economics has the most problems. In that context, the enriched concept of multiple self is proposed and investigated. However, it is not enough to present the criticisms towards value-free economics. For scientists, a bad (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  33.  89
    What counts as relevant criticism? Longino's critical contextual empiricism and the feminist criticism of mainstream economics.Teemu Lari - 2024 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science 104:88-97.
    I identify and resolve an internal tension in Critical Contextual Empiricism (CCE) – the normative account of science developed by Helen Longino. CCE includes two seemingly conflicting principles: on one hand, the cognitive goals of epistemic communities should be open to critical discussion (the openness of goals to criticism principle, OGC); on the other hand, criticism must be aligned with the cognitive goals of that community to count as “relevant” and thus require a response (the goal-relativity of response-requiring criticism (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  34. Two Views of Natural Law and the Shaping of Economic Science.Sergio Cremaschi - 2002 - Croatian Journal of Philosophy 2 (2):181-196.
    In this paper I argue that differences between the ‘new moral science’ of the seventeenth century and scholastic natural law theory originated primarily from the skeptical challenge the former had to face. Pufendorf’s project of a scientia practica universalis is the paramount expression of an anti-skeptical moral science, a ‘science’ that is both explanatory and normative, but also anti-dogmatic insofar as it tries to base its laws on those basic phenomena of human life which, supposedly, are immune to skeptical (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  35. Interpretation LDMU (Law Diminishing Marginal Utility) on the Philosophy Asymmetry of Economic Materialism for Community Financial Stability.Pratama Angga - manuscript
    We know that technological developments will affect economic development which will have an impact on the level of public consumption. Law Diminishing Marginal Utility cause boredom which will comprehensively reduce one's purchasing power and interest in the commodities on the market. Capitalism and its development always try to encourage people's consumption continuously to the maximum point. Hedonism and consumerism cause financial imbalances which are a real threat to our society today. Law Diminishing Marginal Utility and followed by the application of (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  36. Democracy after Deliberation: Bridging the Constitutional Economics/Deliberative Democracy Divide.Shane Ralston - 2007 - Dissertation, University of Ottawa
    This dissertation addresses a debate about the proper relationship between democratic theory and institutions. The debate has been waged between two rival approaches: on the one side is an aggregative and economic theory of democracy, known as constitutional economics, and on the other side is deliberative democracy. The two sides endorse starkly different positions on the issue of what makes a democracy legitimate and stable within an institutional setting. Constitutional economists model political agents in the same way that neoclassical (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  37. The Optional Protocol to the International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights (OP-ICESCR).Deepa Kansra & Mallika Ramachandran - manuscript
    Human rights treaties are often attached and complemented with Optional Protocols. The Optional protocol instruments are adopted after careful deliberation between different stakeholders including member states to human rights treaties. -/- The present document on Introduction to the International Covenant on Economic Social and Cultural Rights- Optional Protocol [OP-ICESCR] is an addition to the on-going work on the Human Rights Framework on ESC Rights. It covers basic information on the objectives of the OP and the key provisions dealing with the (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  38. Methodical approaches to assessing the military and economic capacity of the country.Mykola Tkach, Ivan Tkach, Serhii Yasenko, Igor Britchenko & Peter Lošonczi - 2022 - Journal of Scientific Papers «Social Development and Security» 12 (3):81-97.
    The aim of the article is to develop the existing methodological approaches to assessing the military and economic capabilities of the country in conditions of war and peace. To achieve the purpose of the study, its decomposition was carried out and the following were investigated: existing approaches to assessing the military and economic potential of the country, the country's power and national power; the concept of critical load of the national economy is revealed; the generally accepted norms on financing of (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  39. Efficiency, Practices, and the Moral Point of View: Limits of Economic Interpretations of Law.Mark Tunick - 2009 - In Mark White (ed.), Theoretical Foundations of Law and Economics. Cambridge University Press.
    This paper points to some limitations of law and economics as both an explanative and a normative theory. In explaining law as the result of efficiency promoting decisions, law and economics theorists often dismiss the reasons actors in the legal system give for their behavior. Recognizing that sometimes actors may be unaware of why institutions evolve as they do, I argue that the case for dismissing reasons for action is weaker when those reasons make reference to rules (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  40. A defense of reasonable pluralism in economics.Louis Larue - 2022 - Journal of Economic Methodology 29 (4):294-308.
    This article aims to defend a novel account of pluralism in economics. First, it argues that what justifies pluralism is its epistemological benefits. Second, it acknowledges that pluralism has limits, and defends reasonable pluralism, or the view that we should only accept those theories and methods that can be justified by their communities with reasons that other communities can accept. Clearly, reasonable pluralism is an ideal, which requires economists of different persuasions to respect certain norms of communication while evaluating (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  41. Toleration and the design of norms.Luciano Floridi - 2015 - Science and Engineering Ethics 21 (5):1095-1123.
    One of the pressing challenges we face today—in a post-Westphalian order and post-Bretton Woods world —is how to design the right kind of MAS that can take full advantage of the socio-economic and political progress made so far, while dealing successfully with the new global challenges that are undermining the best legacy of that very progress. This is the topic of the article. In it, I argue that in order to design the right kind of MAS, we need to design (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  42. A Review of Data-Intensive Approaches for Sustainability: Methodology, Epistemology, Normativity, and Ontology.Vivek Anand Asokan - 2020 - Sustainability Science 15.
    With the growth of data, data-intensive approaches for sustainability are becoming widespread and have been endorsed by various stakeholders. To understand their implications, in this paper data-intensive approaches for sustainability will be explored by conducting an extensive review. The current data-intensive approaches are defined as an amalgamation of traditional data-collection methods, like surveys and data from monitoring networks, with new data-collection methods that involve new information communication technology. Based on a comprehensive review of the current dataintensive approaches for sustainability, key (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  43. Contemporary Representations of the Female Body: Consumerism and the Normative Discourse of Beauty.Venera Dimulescu - 2015 - Symposion: Theoretical and Applied Inquiries in Philosophy and Social Sciences 2 (4): 505–514.
    In the context of the perpetual reproduction of consumerism in contemporary western societies, the varied and often contradictory principles of third wave feminism have been misunderstood or redefined by the dominant economic discourse of the markets. The lack of homogeneity in the theoretical debates of the third wave feminism seems to be a vulnerable point in the appropriation of its emancipatory ideals by the post-modern consumerist narratives. The beauty norm, particularly, brings the most problematic questions forth in the contemporary feminist (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  44.  39
    Cooperation in Value-Creating Networks: Relational Perspectives on Governing Social and Economic Value Creation in the 21st Century.Josef Wieland (ed.) - 2024 - Springer.
    In this chapter, I systematically distinguish a variety of ways to rela- tionalize economics and focus on a certain approach to relationalizing normative economics in the light of communal values salient in the African philosophical tradi- tion. I start by distinguishing four major ways to relationalize empirical economics, viz., in terms of its ontologies, methods, explanations, and predictions and also three major ways to relationalize normative economics, with regard to means taken towards ends, decision-procedures (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  45.  60
    Cooperation in Value-Creating Networks Relational Perspectives on Governing Social and Economic Value Creation in the 21st Century.Josef Wieland (ed.) - 2024 - Springer.
    In this chapter, I systematically distinguish a variety of ways to rela- tionalize economics and focus on a certain approach to relationalizing normative economics in the light of communal values salient in the African philosophical tradi- tion. I start by distinguishing four major ways to relationalize empirical economics, viz., in terms of its ontologies, methods, explanations, and predictions and also three major ways to relationalize normative economics, with regard to means taken towards ends, decision-procedures (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  46.  37
    Cooperation in Value-Creating Networks: Relational Perspectives on Governing Social and Economic Value Creation in the 21st Century.Josef Wieland (ed.) - 2024 - Springer.
    In this chapter, I systematically distinguish a variety of ways to rela- tionalize economics and focus on a certain approach to relationalizing normative economics in the light of communal values salient in the African philosophical tradi- tion. I start by distinguishing four major ways to relationalize empirical economics, viz., in terms of its ontologies, methods, explanations, and predictions and also three major ways to relationalize normative economics, with regard to means taken towards ends, decision-procedures (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  47. “Interest, Disinterestedness, and Pragmatic Interestedness: Jewish Contributions to the Search for a Moral Economic Vision”.Nadav S. Berman - 2022 - In Michel Dion & Moses Pava (eds.), The Spirit of Conscious Capitalism: Contributions of World Religions and Spiritualities. Springer. pp. 85-108.
    This chapter does not presume to outline a new economic theory, nor a novel perspective on Jewish approaches to economy. Rather, it suggests the concept of pragmatic interestedness (PI) as means for thinking on the search for conscious or moral forms of capitalism. In short, pragmatic interestedness means that having interests is basic to human nature, and that interestedness is or can be non-egoistic and pro-social. This chapter proposes that PI, which has a significant role in normative Jewish tradition, (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  48. Towards an Immanent Conception of Economic Agency: Or, A Speech on Metaphysics to its Cultured Despisers.Christopher Yeomans & Justin Litaker - 2017 - Hegel Bulletin 38 (2):241-265.
    When it comes to social criticism of the economy, Critical Theory has thus far failed to discover specific immanent norms in that sphere of activity. In response, we propose that what is needed is to double down on the idealism of Critical Theory by taking seriously the sophisticated structure of agency developed in Hegel’s own account of freedom as self-determination. When we do so, we will see that the anti-metaphysical gestures of recent Critical Theory work in opposition to its attempts (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  49. On H. M. Oliver’s “Established Expectations and American Economic Policies”.Govind Persad - 2015 - Ethics 125 (3):829-832,.
    In this retrospective for Ethics, I discuss H.M. Oliver’s “Established Expectations and American Economic Policies.” This article, by a then-modestly-famous economist, has been ignored (no citations) since its 1940 publication. Yet it bears directly on a normative problem at the intersection of ethics and economics that challenges today’s policymakers but has received comparatively little philosophical attention: how should we balance potentially desirable institutional change against the disruption of established expectations? -/- Oliver details how the principle of fulfilling established (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  50.  90
    Searching for the Anthropological Foundations of Economic Practice: Controversies and Opportunities.Gerrit Glas (ed.) - 2022
    This chapter appeared in: G. J. van Nes et al. (eds.), Relational Anthropology for Contemporary Economics. Dordrecht: Springer, 121-132. -/- Abstract: This chapter is a comment on the contribution of Rebecca Klein in this volume, preceded by a conceptual analysis of the argument that is developed in the Homo Amans position paper. The main question that is raised is twofold and concerns the relation between science and worldview on the one hand, and between science and economic life on the (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
1 — 50 / 1000