Results for 'phronesis'

117 found
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  1. AS RELAÇÕES ENTRE “FINS” E “MEIOS” E A RELEVÂNCIA MORAL DA PHRONESIS NA ÉTICA DE ARISTÓTELES.Lucas Angioni - 2009 - Revista Filosófica de Coimbra 18 (35):185-204.
    I discuss three kinds of relationship between ends and means (or "things that promote ends") in the Aristotelian ethical theory, in order to clarify how moral virtues and phronesis are related both in adopting ends and in determining means for virtuous actions. Phronesis seems to be mainly charged with determining means for an end given by the moral virtues, but it must involve some conception of ends too. Phronesis cannot be parasitic on moral virtue concerning the conception (...)
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  2. Hermeneutics and the Ancient Philosophical Legacy: Hermeneia and Phronesis.Jussi Backman - 2016 - In Niall Keane & Chris Lawn (eds.), The Blackwell Companion to Hermeneutics. Malden, MA: John Wiley & Sons. pp. 22-33.
    Hermeneutics as we understand it today is an essentially modern phenomenon. The chapter presents observations that illustrate some of the central ways in which the modern and late modern phenomena of philosophical hermeneutics relate to the ancient philosophical legacy. First, the roots of hermeneutics are traced to ancient views on linguistic, textual, and sacral interpretation. The chapter then looks at certain fundamentally unhermeneutic elements of the Platonic, Aristotelian, and Augustinian “logocentric” theory of meaning that philosophical hermeneutics and its heirs sought (...)
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  3.  58
    Phronesis and Hermeneutics: The Construct of Social / Economic Phenomenon and Their Interpretation for a Sustainable Society. Jackson - 2016 - Economic Insights - Trends and Challenges 8 (2):1-8.
    This article has provided a forum for analytical discourses pertaining to two philosophical and methodological concepts (Phronesis and Hermeneutics) in a bid to addressing the key objectives set out. Dscussions emanated from the work (more so from literature review carried out) clearly shows that, there is no crystal dichotomy between the two concepts, but more so the prevalence of inter-connectedness and interpretation of situations or even texts can also be based on an expression of positive biasness towards what one (...)
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  4. Phronesis e Virtude do Caráter em Aristóteles: comentários a Ética a Nicômaco VI.Lucas Angioni - 2011 - Dissertatio 34:303-345.
    These are commentaries to the translation into Portuguese of Nicomachean Ethics VI, found in the same volume of Dissertatio.
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  5. Nicomachean Ethics VI.9: Good Deliberation and Phronesis.Angelo Antonio Pires De Oliveira - 2017 - Princípios: Revista de Filosofia 24 (44):9-41.
    In this paper, I put under scrutiny the arguments put forward by Aristotle in Nicomachean Ethics (NE) VI.9. The paper has two main parts. In the first, I examine the NE VI.9’s first part where Aristotle develops the concept of good deliberation, offering its definition in 1142b27-28. In the second, I examine the connection between good deliberation and phronesis, and, then, I discuss the vexata quæstio about if the lines 1142b31-33 might be read as introducing the claim that (...) provides moral ends. (shrink)
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  6.  57
    Una apostilla a la noción aristotélica de phrónesis.Esteban J. Beltrán Ulate - 2015 - Revista Agora Trujillo 18 (35):101-110.
    El artículo propone una serie de comentarios a propósito de la noción de Phrónesis, el carácter del estudio es introductorio y prevé esclarecer considerandos aristotélicos respecto a la noción, librándola de interpretaciones erróneas.
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  7. Phronesis as Ethical Expertise: Naturalism of Second Nature and the Unity of Virtue.Mario De Caro, Maria Silvia Vaccarezza & Ariele Niccoli - 2018 - Journal of Value Inquiry 52 (3):287-305.
    This paper has a twofold aim. On the one hand, we will discuss the much debated question of the source of normativity (which traditionally has nature and practical reason as the two main contenders to this role) and propose a new answer to it. Second, in answering this question, we will present a new account of practical wisdom, which conceives of the ethical virtues as ultimately unified in the chief virtue of phronesis, understood as ethical expertise. To do so, (...)
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  8. Ética e sabedoria prática: um estudo sobre a Phronesis a partir da Ethica Nicomachea.Lucidalva Pereira Golçalves - 2016 - Dissertation, Universidade Federal Do Maranhão, Brazil
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  9.  78
    Virtude do Caráter e Phronesis na Ethica Nicomachea.Angelo Antonio Pires De Oliveira - 2017 - Dissertation, University of Campinas, Brazil
    In the Nicomachean Ethics, Aristotle makes the following claims: “the end cannot be a subject of deliberation, but only what contributes to the ends” (NE 1112b33-34) and “virtue makes the goal right, practical wisdom makes the things to- ward the goal right" (NE 1144a7-9). A problem arises from such claims: the ends as- sumed by a moral agent cannot be subject to rational choice. For deliberation, an intel- lectual procedure, is bound to deal with the things that contribute to the (...)
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  10.  33
    Racionalidad práctica: Phronesis y sindéresis para una teoría de la decisión moral.Fabio Morandín Ahuerma - 2017 - Stoa 8 (16):63-77.
    In this article the concepts of prudence and synderesis are contrasted, the first from the Aristotelian point of view and the second from the School of Paris. Prudence is defined as the method for achieving the desired ends and synderesis as the natural ability to judge rightly. Although it has been thought that they are two concepts unequipable, in this work I argue that ( Φρόνησις - phronesis) prudence and (Συντήρηοη - synderesis) synderresis are two moments which are part (...)
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  11. A Phronesis na Ética a Nicômaco.Adriano Sotero Bin - 2018 - Dissertation, UNB, Brazil
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  12. Ética e Sabedoria Prática: um estudo sobre a Phronesis a partir da Ethica Nicomachea.Lucidalva Pereira Gonçalves - 2017 - Porto Alegre, Brazil: Editora Fi.
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  13. A Phronesis (Prudência) como condição necessária para a realização da eudaimonia (felicidade).Ianna Cerqueira Santos - 2014 - Dissertation, UFSC, Brazil
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  14. The VIA Inventory of Strengths, Positive Youth Development, and Moral Education.Hyemin Han - forthcoming - Journal of Positive Psychology.
    The VIA Inventory of Strengths and the VIA model were originally developed to assess and study 24 character strengths. In this paper, I discuss how the VIA Inventory and its character strength model can be applied to the field of moral education with moral philosophical considerations. First, I review previous factor analysis studies that have consistently reported factors containing candidates for moral virtues, and discuss the systematic structure and organization of VIA character strengths. Second, I discuss several issues related to (...)
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  15.  99
    Soldierly Virtue: An Argument for the Restructuring of Western Military Ethics to Align with Aristotelian Virtue Ethics.John Baldari - 2018 - Dissertation, University of Leeds
    Because wars are fought by human beings and not merely machines, a strong virtue ethic is an essential prerequisite for those engaged in combat. From a philosophical perspective, war has historically been seen as separate and outside of the commonly accepted forms of morality. Yet there remains a general, though not well-thought out, sense that those human beings who fight wars should act ethically. Since warfighters are often called upon to contemplate and complete tasks during war that are not normally (...)
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  16. O conceito de direito na filosofia moral gadameriana.Saulo Monteiro de Matos - 2012 - Revista de Estudos Constitucionais, Hermenêutica E Teoria Do Direito 4 (1):90-101.
    Hans-Georg Gadamer é reconhecido como um dos mais importantes filósofos do famoso linguistic turn. Malgrado a aparente recepção de seus debates filosóficos no campo da hermenêutica jurídica e, mais recentemente, da ética do direito, o seu conceito de direito ou, mais precisamente, os fundamentos de uma possível filosofia do direito gadameriana nunca foram submetidos a uma investigação jusfilosófica mais detalhada. Em parte porque a maioria dos comentadores da obra de Gadamer continua a ler seus escritos com uma forte referência às (...)
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  17. Aristóteles: Etica a Nicômaco Livro VI.Lucas Angioni - 2011 - Dissertatio 34:285-300.
    Tradução para o Português de Ethica Nicomachea VI.
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  18. Notas sobre a definição de virtude moral em Aristóteles (EN 1106b 36- 1107a 2).Lucas Angioni - 2009 - Journal of Ancient Philosophy 3 (1):1-17.
    This paper discusses some issues concerning the definition of moral virtue in Nicomachean Ethics 1106b 36- 1107a 2. It is reasonable to expect from a definition the complete enumeration of the relevant features of its definiendum, but the definition of moral virtue seems to fail in doing this task. One might be tempted to infer that this definition is intended by Aristotle as a mere preliminary account that should be replaced by a more precise one. The context of the argument (...)
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  19. EM QUE SENTIDO A VIRTUDE É MAIS EXATA QUE A TÉCNICA? NOTAS SOBRE ETHICA NICOMACHEA 1106B 14-16.Lucas Angioni - 2009 - Dissertatio 29:43-58.
    This paper examines what Aristotle could have meant in Nicomachean Ethics 1106b 14-16, when he says that moral virtue is more exact than craft. Aristotle’s meaning cannot be that moral knowledge is more exact than technical knowledge. Neither the practical knowledge that an agent has about the precepts guiding his actions nor the philosophical knowledge framed in a moral theory could be described as “more exact than craft- knowledge”. My point is that Aristotle’s meaning is better understood if he is (...)
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  20. Cultivating Practical Wisdom.Jason Swartwood - 2013 - Dissertation, University of Minnesota
    Practical wisdom (hereafter simply “wisdom”) is the intellectual virtue that enables a person to make reliably good decisions about how, all-things-considered, to live and conduct herself. Because wisdom is such an important and high-level achievement, we should wonder: what is the nature of wisdom? What kinds of skills, habits and capacities does it involve? Can real people actually develop it? If so, how? I argue that we can answer these questions by modeling wisdom on expert decision-making skill in complex areas (...)
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  21.  63
    Co-Reading Aristotle’s Practical Reasoning.Mostafa Younesie - manuscript
    In Islamic Arabic /Persian thought speculations about ethics may be divided into textual / scriptural; theological; religious; and philosophical too. The “philosophical ethics” has within itself Socratic, Platonic, Aristotelian and neo-Platonic trends and versions with such main thinkers such as Farabi; Avicenna; and Averroes. Here we will concentrate on Farabi and those aspects of his speculations that are Aristotelian and can be reordered and arranged around “practical reasoning”.
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  22.  84
    Deliberación, deliberación técnica y buena deliberación en la ética aristotélica.Alejandro Farieta - 2019 - Tópicos: Revista de Filosofía (56):11-48.
    This paper faces the problem of how to determinate the framework in which, according to Aristotle, the deliberation and his results can be assessed: the decision and the consequent action. The problem emerges mainly because of what Aristotle calls “indetermination of deliberation,” since, in situations whose options about what to deliberate are blurred, it is difficult to determinate which is the framework that can be used to determinate if the decision resulting from the deliberation is accurate or not. To face (...)
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  23.  70
    O Conflito Moral de Neoptólemo : uma leitura aristotélica da tragédia Filoctetes (EN VII 1146a16-21e 1151b17-22).Angelo Antonio Pires de Oliveira - 2017 - Hypnos 38:72-92.
    Contrapondo-se às interpretações que sobrevalorizam o papel da razão nas escolhas dos fins morais, pretendo resgatar o papel positivo que a virtude do caráter, uma virtude não-racional, pode exercer em tais escolhas. Isto será feito levando em consideração a análise que Aristóteles faz da crise moral de Neoptólemo na tragédia Filoctetes.
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  24. Intelecto en acción: Aristóteles y la filosofía como forma de vida.Alejandro Farieta - 2018 - Bogotá, Colombia: Editorial Uniagustiniana.
    This book faces the problem of how is it possible to conceive Aristotelian philosophy as a way of life, and not as a discipline or profession. If there are any of his texts where this concerns are to be found, it is in his practical treatises, in which he defends a philosophy of human affairs. However, Aristotle insists on the fact that philosophy, in its greatest expression, is the first philosophy, to which the idea of contemplation seems to refer to, (...)
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  25. Thrasymachus’ Unerring Skill and the Arguments of Republic 1.Tamer Nawar - 2018 - Phronesis 63 (4):359-391.
    In defending the view that justice is the advantage of the stronger, Thrasymachus puzzlingly claims that rulers never err and that any practitioner of a skill or expertise (τέχνη) is infallible. In what follows, Socrates offers a number of arguments directed against Thrasymachus’ views concerning the nature of skill, ruling, and justice. Commentators typically take a dim view of both Thrasymachus’ claims about skill (which are dismissed as an ungrounded and purely ad hoc response to Socrates’ initial criticisms) and Socrates’ (...)
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  26. Hubungan antara konformitas dan konsep diri dengan perilaku konsumtif pada remaja putri.Albertina Saady Zebua & Rosyiana D. Nurdjayadi - 2001 - Phronesis 3 (6):72-82.
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  27.  65
    The Guise of the Beautiful: Symposium 204d Ff.Jonathan Fine - forthcoming - Phronesis:1-24.
    A crux of Plato’s Symposium is how beauty relates to the good. Diotima distinguishes beauty from the good, I show, to explain how erotic pursuits are characteristically ambivalent and opaque. Human beings pursue beauty without knowing why or thinking it good; yet they are rational, if aiming at happiness. Central to this reconstruction is a passage widely taken to show that beauty either coincides with the good or demands disinterested admiration. It shows rather that what one loves as beautiful does (...)
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  28.  52
    Living Without a Soul: Why God and the Heavenly Movers Fall Outside of Aristotle’s Psychology.Caleb Cohoe - forthcoming - Phronesis: A Journal for Ancient Philosophy.
    I argue that Aristotle's science of the soul only covers sublunary living things. Aristotle cannot properly ascribe soul to unmoved movers since they do not have any capacities that are distinct from their activities or any matter to be structured. Heavenly bodies do not have souls in the way that mortal living things do, because their matter is not subject to alteration or generation. These beings do not fit into the hierarchy of soul powers that Aristotle relies on to provide (...)
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  29.  37
    Aristotle and the Origins of Evil.Jozef Müller - forthcoming - Phronesis: A Journal for Ancient Philosophy:1-45.
    The paper addresses the following question: why do human beings, on Aristotle’s view, have an innate tendency to badness, that is, to developing desires that go beyond, and often against, their natural needs? Given Aristotle’s teleological assumptions (including the thesis that nature does nothing in vain), such tendency should not be present. I argue that the culprit is to be found in the workings of rationality. In particular, it is the presence of theoretical reason that necessitates the limitless nature of (...)
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  30.  23
    Demonstration and the Indemonstrability of the Stoic Indemonstrables.Susanne Bobzien - forthcoming - Phronesis.
    Since Mates’ seminal Stoic Logic there has been uncertainty and debate about how to treat the term anapodeiktos when used of Stoic syllogisms. This paper argues that the customary translation of anapodeiktos by ‘indemonstrable’ is accurate, and it explains why this is so. At the heart of the explanation is an argument that, contrary to what is commonly assumed, indemonstrability is rooted in the generic account of the Stoic epistemic notion of demonstration (apodeixis). Some minor insights into Stoic logic ensue.
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  31.  49
    What Are the Wages of Justice? Rethinking Plato's Division of Goods.Merrick Anderson - forthcoming - Phronesis.
    Against the standard view that the Republic’s division of goods distinguishes between intrinsic and instrumental value, a growing number of scholars have correctly argued that goods possess value δι᾽ αὑτό in virtue of some of their causal effects. However, these scholars have not yet given a convincing and principled account of what it means to be valuable διὰ τὰ γιγνόμενα ἀπ’ αὐτοῦ such that some effects can contribute to the value a good has δι᾽ αὑτό. In this paper I offer (...)
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  32. Practical and Productive Thinking in Aristotle.Jozef Müller - 2018 - Phronesis 63 (2):148-175.
    I argue that on Aristotle’s account practical thinking is thinking whose origin (archē) is a desire that has as its object the very thing that one reasons about how to promote. This feature distinguishes practical from productive reasoning since in the latter the desire that initiates it is not (unless incidentally) a desire for the object that one productively reasons about. The feature has several interesting consequences: (a) there is only a contingent relationship between the desire that one practically reasons (...)
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  33. The Ethics of Narrative Art: Philosophy in Schools, Compassion and Learning From Stories.Laura D'Olimpio & Andrew Peterson - 2018 - Journal of Philosophy in Schools 5 (1):92-110.
    Following neo-Aristotelians Alasdair MacIntyre and Martha Nussbaum, we claim that humans are story-telling animals who learn from the stories of diverse others. Moral agents use rational emotions, such as compassion which is our focus here, to imaginatively reconstruct others’ thoughts, feelings and goals. In turn, this imaginative reconstruction plays a crucial role in deliberating and discerning how to act. A body of literature has developed in support of the role narrative artworks (i.e. novels and films) can play in allowing us (...)
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  34. Kingship and Philosophy in Aristotle's Best Regime.P. A. Vander Waerdt - 1985 - Phronesis 30 (3):249-273.
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  35. Intrinsic Valuing and the Limits of Justice: Why the Ring of Gyges Matters.Tyler Paytas & Nicholas R. Baima - 2019 - Phronesis 64 (1):1-9.
    Commentators such as Terence Irwin (1999) and Christopher Shields (2006) claim that the Ring of Gyges argument in Republic II cannot demonstrate that justice is chosen only for its consequences. This is because valuing justice for its own sake is compatible with judging its value to be overridable. Through examination of the rational commitments involved in valuing normative ideals such as justice, we aim to show that this analysis is mistaken. If Glaucon is right that everyone would endorse Gyges’ behavior, (...)
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  36.  22
    What Are the Wages of Justice? Rethinking the Republic’s Division of Goods.Merrick Anderson - forthcoming - Phronesis:1-26.
    A growing number of scholars have seen that the Republic’s division of goods includes goods which possess value δι᾽ αὑτό in virtue of some of their causal effects. Building on this, I argue that goods, including justice, which are valuable διὰ τὰ γιγνόµενα ἀπ’ αὐτοῦ are so in virtue of a limited class of beneficial effects: those that depend on the recognition of other agents. This way of dividing goods explains why Socrates legitimately invokes some effects of justice in his (...)
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  37. The Living Gesture and the Signifying Moment.Eugene Halton - 2004 - Symbolic Interaction 27 (1):89-113.
    Drawing from Peircean semiotics, from the Greek conception of phronesis, and from considerations of bodily awareness as a basis of reasonableness, I attempt to show how the living gesture touches our deepest signifying nature, the self, and public life. Gestural bodily awareness, more than knowledge, connects us with the very conditions out of which the human body evolved into its present condition and remains a vital resource in the face of a devitalizing, rationalistic consumption culture. It may be precisely (...)
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  38. Aristotle on the Best Good: Is Nicomachean Ethics 1094a18-22 Fallacious?Peter Vranas - 2005 - Phronesis 50 (2):116-128.
    The first sentence of NE I.2 has roughly the form: "If A [there is a universal end] and B, then D [this end will be the best good]". According to some commentators, Aristotle uses B to infer A; but then the sentence is fallacious. According to other commentators, Aristotle does not use B ; but then the sentence is bizarre. Contrary to both sets of commentators, I suggest that Aristotle uses B together with A to infer validly that there is (...)
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  39. Why the Intellect Cannot Have a Bodily Organ: De Anima 3.4.Caleb Cohoe - 2013 - Phronesis 58 (4):347-377.
    I reconstruct Aristotle’s reasons for thinking that the intellect cannot have a bodily organ. I present Aristotle’s account of the aboutness or intentionality of cognitive states, both perceptual and intellectual. On my interpretation, Aristotle’s account is based around the notion of cognitive powers taking on forms in a special preservative way. Based on this account, Aristotle argues that no physical structure could enable a bodily part or combination of bodily parts to produce or determine the full range of forms that (...)
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  40. Aristotle on Virtue of Character and the Authority of Reason.Jozef Müller - 2019 - Phronesis: A Journal for Ancient Philosophy 64 (1):10-56.
    I argue that, for Aristotle, virtue of character is a state of the non-rational part of the soul that makes one prone to making and acting on decisions in virtue of that part’s standing in the right relation to (correct) reason, namely, a relation that qualifies the agent as a true self-lover. In effect, this central feature of virtue of character is nothing else than love of practical wisdom. As I argue, it not only explains how reason can hold direct (...)
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  41. The Development of Modus Ponens in Antiquity: From Aristotle to the 2nd Century AD.Susanne Bobzien - 2002 - Phronesis 47 (4):359-394.
    ABSTRACT: This paper traces the earliest development of the most basic principle of deduction, i.e. modus ponens (or Law of Detachment). ‘Aristotelian logic’, as it was taught from late antiquity until the 20th century, commonly included a short presentation of the argument forms modus (ponendo) ponens, modus (tollendo) tollens, modus ponendo tollens, and modus tollendo ponens. In late antiquity, arguments of these forms were generally classified as ‘hypothetical syllogisms’. However, Aristotle did not discuss such arguments, nor did he call any (...)
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  42. When and Why Understanding Needs Phantasmata: A Moderate Interpretation of Aristotle’s De Memoria and De Anima on the Role of Images in Intellectual Activities.Caleb Cohoe - 2016 - Phronesis: A Journal for Ancient Philosophy 61 (3):337-372.
    I examine the passages where Aristotle maintains that intellectual activity employs φαντάσματα (images) and argue that he requires awareness of the relevant images. This, together with Aristotle’s claims about the universality of understanding, gives us reason to reject the interpretation of Michael Wedin and Victor Caston, on which φαντάσματα serve as the material basis for thinking. I develop a new interpretation by unpacking the comparison Aristotle makes to the role of diagrams in doing geometry. In theoretical understanding of mathematical and (...)
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  43. L’apprentissage professionnel des enseignants stagiaires de l’enseignement agricole français durant le stage de pratique accompagnéeProfessional training of student teachers in French agricultural education during their practical work experience.Audrey Garcia - 2012 - Revue Phronesis 1 (4):37.
    This article, based on a socio-cognitive approach, deals with the professional training of student teachers in French agricultural education during their practical work experience. The main objective is to demonstrate that the student teacher’s social interaction with his academic advisor allows him to use and develop his professional knowledge relating to practical matters. Based on a qualitative analysis this study presents the results of an investigation of seven students and six academic advisors. The article studies the interrelations between the nature (...)
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  44. Acquiring Aristotelian Virtue.Nafsika Athanassoulis - 2018 - In The Oxford Handbook of Virtue. pp. 415-431.
    Abstract: This chapter examines the role of the virtuous agent in the acquisition of virtue. It rejects the view of the virtuous agent as a direct model for imitation and instead focuses on recent research on the importance of phronesis. Phronesis is understood as a type of moral ‘know how’ expertise that is supported by a variety of abilities, from emotional maturity, to self-reflection, to an empathic understanding of what moves others, to an ability to see beyond the (...)
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  45. Choice and Action in Aristotle.A. W. Price - unknown
    There is a current debate about the grammar of intention: do I intend to φ, or that I φ? The equivalent question in Aristotle relates especially to choice. I argue that, in the context of practical reasoning, choice, as also wish, has as its object an act. I then explore the role that this plays within his account of the relation of thought to action. In particular, I discuss the relation of deliberation to the practical syllogism, and the thesis that (...)
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  46. Embryological Models in Ancient Philosophy.Devin Henry - 2005 - Phronesis 50 (1):1 - 42.
    Historically embryogenesis has been among the most philosophically intriguing phenomena. In this paper I focus on one aspect of biological development that was particularly perplexing to the ancients: self-organisation. For many ancients, the fact that an organism determines the important features of its own development required a special model for understanding how this was possible. This was especially true for Aristotle, Alexander, and Simplicius, who all looked to contemporary technology to supply that model. However, they did not all agree on (...)
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  47. Komitmen Organisasi: Karyawan Dengan Kepribadian Tipe a Dan Tipe B.Veronica Ruvina - 2010 - Phronesis (Misc) 9 (2).
    The aim of this study is to describe organizational commitment between type A personality’s and type B is personality’s workers on three companies. Organizational commitment is define as the degree of psychological identification with or attachment to the organization for which we work. Participant of this study was 108 workers from three different companies. Data was obtained by questionnaire and processed with SPSS for Windows ver. 12. Using Mann-Whitney independent t-test for non parametric, the result of organizational commitment U = (...)
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  48. ‘What’s Teleology Got To Do With It?’ A Reinterpretation of Aristotle’s Generation of Animals V.Mariska Leunissen & Allan Gotthelf - 2010 - Phronesis 55 (4):325-356.
    Despite the renewed interest in Aristotle’s Generation of Animals in recent years, the subject matter of GA V, its preferred mode(s) of explanation, and its place in the treatise as a whole remain misunderstood. Scholars focus on GA I-IV, which explain animal generation in terms of efficient-final causation, but dismiss GA V as a mere appendix, thinking it to concern (a) individual, accidental differences among animals, which are (b) purely materially necessitated, and (c) are only tangentially related to the topics (...)
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  49. Anarchic Souls: Plato’s Depiction of the ‘Democratic Man’.Mark Johnstone - 2013 - Phronesis 58 (2):139-59.
    In books 8 and 9 of Plato’s Republic, Socrates provides a detailed account of the nature and origins of four main kinds of vice found in political constitutions and in the kinds of people that correspond to them. The third of the four corrupt kinds of person he describes is the ‘democratic man’. In this paper, I ask what ‘rules’ in the democratic man’s soul. It is commonly thought that his soul is ruled in some way by its appetitive part, (...)
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  50. A Relative Improvement.Tad Brennan & Jongsuh James Lee - 2014 - Phronesis 59 (3):246-271.
    The Mode of Relativity in Agrippa’s Five Modes does not fit with the other four modes, and disrupts an otherwise elegant system. We argue that it is not the familiar argument from epistemic relativism, but a formal condition on the structure of justifications: the principle that epistemic grounding relations cannot be reflexive. This understanding of Agrippan Relativity leads to a better understanding of the Modes of Hypothesis and Reciprocity, a clearer outline of the structure of Agrippa’s system as a whole, (...)
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