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  1. Aesthetic Values Are Distal Versions of Practical Values.Tom Cochrane - forthcoming - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism.
    This is a 1000 word summary of my theory of aesthetic value. I claim that value should be understood as an activity rather than a property, that aesthetic values are objectified final values, that they are distal versions of practical values, and that each one involves balancing a tension. This is for an upcoming symposium at the JAAC in which 11 philosophers outline their positions on aesthetic value.
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  2. The Aesthetic Value of Literary Works in Roman Ingarden’s Philosophy.Hicham Jakha - 2022 - Kultura I Wartości (32):165-185.
    In this paper, I attempt to formulate an Ingardenian conception of the literary work’s aesthetic value. Following Mitscherling’s lead, I attempt to place Ingarden’s aesthetics within his overall phenomenological-ontological project. That is, I argue that Ingarden’s aesthetics can only be properly fathomed in the context of his ontological deliberations, since, as he himself often enunciated, all his philosophical investigations constitute a realist rejoinder to Husserl’s turn toward transcendental idealism. To this end, I bring together insights from his aesthetics and ontology (...)
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  3. On the Wellbeing of Aesthetic Beings.Sherri Irvin - forthcoming - In Helena Fox, Kathleen Galvin, Michael Musalek, Martin Poltrum & Yuriko Saito (eds.), Oxford Handbook of Mental Health and Contemporary Western Aesthetics. Oxford University Press.
    As aesthetic beings, we are receptive to and engaged with the sensuous phenomena of life while also knowing that we are targets of others’ awareness: we are both aesthetic agents and aesthetic objects. Our psychological health, our standing within our communities, and our overall wellbeing can be profoundly affected by our aesthetic surroundings and by whether and how we receive aesthetic recognition from others. Being aware of and responsive to how others aesthetically experience us shapes our sense of self and (...)
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  4. Toward a Communitarian Theory of Aesthetic Value.Nick Riggle - 2022 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 80 (1):16-30.
    Our paradigms of aesthetic value condition the philosophical questions we pose and hope to answer about it. Theories of aesthetic value are typically individualistic, in the sense that the paradigms they are designed to capture, and the questions to which they are offered as answers, center the individual’s engagement with aesthetic value. Here I offer some considerations that suggest that such individualism is a mistake and sketch a communitarian way of posing and answering questions about the nature of aesthetic value.
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  5. Intelligible Beauty.James Shelley - forthcoming - Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society.
    Arthur Danto argued from the premise that artworks are essentially cognitive to the conclusion that they are incidentally aesthetic. I wonder why Danto, and the very many of us he persuaded, came to believe that the cognitive and the aesthetic oppose one another. I argue, contrary to Danto’s historical claims, that the cognitive and the aesthetic did not come into opposition until the late nineteenth or early twentieth century, and that they were brought into opposition for reasons of art-critical expediency (...)
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  6. Sanatta Sahtecilik Üzerine.Alper Yavuz - 2018 - In Berrin Taş (ed.), Kaç İnsanı Yaşadım. Cengiz Gündoğdu'nun 75. Yaşına Armağan. İstanbul: İnsancıl Yayınları. pp. 112-117.
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  7. The Truthful Portrait: Can Posing Be a Tool for Authenticity in Portraiture?Aurélie J. Debaene - 2021 - The Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 79 (4):440-451.
    This article explores the compatibility of posing and authenticity in portraiture. Often understood as a source of inauthenticity, I propose that posing in fact functions as an artistic tool that can support a truthful portrayal. My argument first discusses authenticity in relation to portraiture through the lens of Bernard Williams’s idea of “truthfulness,” which relies on his notions of “accuracy” and “sincerity.” Second, I introduce a phenomenology of posing. I identify two aspects of posing that can be present in the (...)
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  8. Aesthetics of the Everyday.Sherri Irvin - 2009 - In Stephen Davies, Kathleen J. Higgins, Robert Hopkins, Robert Stecker & David Cooper (eds.), A Companion to Aesthetics. Wiley-Blackwell. pp. 136-139.
    This reference essay surveys recent work in the emerging sub-discipline of everyday aesthetics, which builds on the work of John Dewey to resist sharp distinctions between art and non-art domains and argue that aesthetic concepts are properly applied to ordinary domains of experience.
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  9. Aesthetics as a Guide to Ethics.Sherri Irvin - 2010 - In Robert Stecker & Theodore Gracyk (eds.), Aesthetics Today: A Reader. Rowman and Littlefield. pp. 370-377.
    This paper argues for several claims about the moral relevance of the aesthetic: that attention to aesthetic values may promote moral motivation; that aesthetic values should be regarded as constraining moral demands; and that the pursuit of aesthetic satisfactions may itself have positive moral value. These arguments suggest that moral thinking should be aesthetically informed to a much greater degree than has been typical. The aesthetic is a central dimension of a good life, and a life’s being good for the (...)
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  10. Reasons, Normativity, and Value in Aesthetics.Alex King - 2022 - Philosophy Compass 17 (1):1-17.
    Discussions of aesthetic reasons and normativity are becoming increasingly popular. This piece outlines six basic questions about aesthetic reasons, normativity, and value and discusses the space of possible answers to these questions. I divide the terrain into two groups of three questions each. First are questions about the shape of aesthetic reasons: what they favour, how strong they are, and where they come from. Second are relational questions about how aesthetic reasons fit into the wider normative landscape: whether they are (...)
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  11. Poetry and the Possibility of Paraphrase.Gregory Currie & Jacopo Frascaroli - 2021 - The Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 79 (4):428-439.
    Why is there a long-standing debate about paraphrase in poetry? Everyone agrees that paraphrase can be useful; everyone agrees that paraphrase is no substitute for the poem itself. What is there to disagree about? Perhaps this: whether paraphrase can specify everything that counts as a contribution to the meaning of a poem. There are, we say, two ways to take the question; on one way of taking it, the answer is that paraphrase cannot. Does this entail that there is meaning (...)
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  12. Architectural Value and the Artistic Value of Architecture.Harry Drummond - 2021 - Debates in Aesthetics 17 (1):13-28.
    This paper seeks to refute the claim that architectural value is one and the same value as the artistic value of architecture. As few scholars explicitly endorse this claim, instead tacitly holding it, I term it the implicit claim. Three potential motivations for the implicit claim are offered before it is shown that, contrary to supporting the claim, they set the foundations for considering architectural value and the artistic value of architecture to be distinct. After refuting the potential motivations and (...)
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  13. Laying One’s Cards on the Table: Experiencing Exile and Finding Our Feet in Moral Philosophical Encounters.Camilla Kronqvist & Natan Elgabsi - 2021 - Open Philosophy 4 (1):404-424.
    Engaging with the philosophical writings of Iris Murdoch, we submit that there are difficulties associated with providing a good description of morality that are intimately connected with difficulties in understanding other human beings. We suggest three senses in which moral philosophical reflection needs to account for our understanding of others: the failure to understand someone is not merely an intellectual failure, but also engages us morally; the moral question of understanding is not limited to the extent to which we understand (...)
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  14. Defending Games: Reply to Hurka, Kukla and Noë. [REVIEW]C. Thi Nguyen - 2021 - Analysis 81 (2):317-337.
    This is my reply to commentators in the symposium on my book, GAMES: AGENCY AS ART. The symposium features commentary by Thomas Hurka, Quill Kukla, and Alva Noe, and originally appeared in Analysis 81 (2).
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  15. The "Work" of Art: Stanisław Brzozowski and Bernard Stiegler.Adrian Mróz - 2021 - Humanities and Social Sciences 28 (3):39-48.
    This article relates the ideas of Stanisław Brzozowski (1878-1911) with those of Bernard Stiegler (1952-2020), both of whom problematize the "work" of art understood as a labor practice. Through the conceptual analysis of epigenetics and epiphylogenetics for aesthetic theory, I claim that both thinkers develop practical concepts relevant to contemporary art philosophy. First, I present an overview of Brzozowski's aesthetics, for whom literature and the arts are linked with ethics, and aesthetic form is tied with moral judgment. Then, I continue (...)
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  16. Los valores estéticos en la perspectiva de Jan Mukarovsky.José Ramón Fabelo Corzo - 2002 - El Cuervo, Revista de la Universidad de Puerto Rico 14 (28):11-15.
    El filósofo checo Jan Mukarovsky (1891-1975) fue uno de los fundadores del Círculo de Praga. Fue el primero en intentar desarrollar una estética semiológica, cuya herramienta metodológica fundamental es el signo. Él está consciente de que el fenómeno estético no es igual ni reductible al lingüístico, por lo que procura una definición del signo mucho más amplia de la que es habitual en los medios lingüísticos. Por ese camino se topa con el tema de los valores estéticos. Su enfoque de (...)
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  17. Ugliness Is in the Gut of the Beholder.Ryan P. Doran - forthcoming - Ergo: An Open Access Journal of Philosophy.
    I offer the first sustained defence of the claim that ugliness is constituted by the disposition to disgust. I advance three main lines of argument in support of this thesis. First, ugliness and disgustingness tend to lie in the same kinds of things and properties (the argument from ostensions). Second, the thesis is better placed than all existing accounts to accommodate the following facts: ugliness is narrowly and systematically distributed in a heterogenous set of things, ugliness is sometimes enjoyed, and (...)
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  18. Traditional Kitsch and the Janus-Head of Comfort.C. E. Emmer - 2014 - In Justyna Stępień (ed.), Redefining Kitsch and Camp in Literature and Culture. Cambridge Scholars Publishing. pp. 23-38.
    "C.E. Emmer’s article addresses the ongoing debates over how to classify and understand kitsch, from the inception of postmodern culture onwards. It is suggested that the lack of clear distinction between fine art and popular culture generates 'approaches to kitsch – what we might call 'deflationary' approaches – that conspire to create the impression that, ultimately, either 'kitsch' should be abandoned as a concept altogether, or we should simply abandon ourselves to enjoying kitschy objects as kitsch.' The author offers critical (...)
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  19. Presentación. Arte e identidad. Entre lo corporal y lo imaginario.José Ramón Fabelo Corzo - 2015 - In José Ramón Fabelo Corzo & Jaime Torija Aguilar (eds.), Arte e identidad. Entre lo corporal y lo imaginario. Puebla, Pue., México: pp. 11-13.
    La identidad, el cuerpo y los imaginarios, en su vínculo con el arte y la cultura, son los conceptos básicos presentes en este libro. La asociación entre ellos no es nada casual. Responde a importantes necesidades epistemológicas y prácticas en la comprensión de lo que somos, de la medida en que el arte y la cultura nos constituyen y del modo en que lo corporal y lo imaginario se convierten en depositarios de los atributos que nos identifican. Esta sexta entrega (...)
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  20. Artistic Objectivity: From Ruskin’s ‘Pathetic Fallacy’ to Creative Receptivity.Eli I. Lichtenstein - 2021 - British Journal of Aesthetics 61 (4):505-526.
    While the idea of art as self-expression can sound old-fashioned, it remains widespread—especially if the relevant ‘selves’ can be social collectives, not just individual artists. But self-expression can collapse into individualistic or anthropocentric self-involvement. And compelling successor ideals for artists are not obvious. In this light, I develop a counter-ideal of creative receptivity to basic features of the external world, or artistic objectivity. Objective artists are not trying to express themselves or reach collective self-knowledge. However, they are also not disinterested (...)
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  21. The Authority of Pleasure.Keren Gorodeisky - 2021 - Noûs 55 (1):199-220.
    The aim of the paper is to reassess the prospects of a widely neglected affective conception of the aesthetic evaluation and appreciation of art. On the proposed picture, the aesthetic evaluation and appreciation of art are non-contingently constituted by a particular kind of pleasure. Artworks that are valuable qua artworks merit, deserve, and call for a certain pleasure, the same pleasure that reveals (or at least purports to reveal) them to be valuable in the way that they are, and constitutes (...)
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  22. Life Through a Lens.Dan Cavedon-Taylor - forthcoming - In Sophie Archer (ed.), Salience: A Philosophical Inquiry.
    Kantian disinterest is the view that aesthetic judgement is constituted (at least in part) by a form of perceptual contemplation that is divorced from concerns of practical action. That view, which continues to be defended to this day, is challenged here on the basis that it is unduly spectator-focussed, ignoring important facets of art-making and its motivations. Beauty moves us, not necessarily to tears or rapt contemplation, but to practical action; crucially, it may do so as part and parcel of (...)
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  23. Estética inorgánica. Detroit en Only Lovers Left Alive.Leonardo Arriagada - 2020 - Archivos de la Filmoteca (78):111-124.
    El cine de Jim Jarmusch es reconocible por captar momentos de quietud en los que la acción y el drama son secundarios. Es por ello que su film Only Lovers Left Alive ha sido tan destacado por críticos y académicos. Esta película ha llevado a la pantalla la estética ruinosa de Detroit. Este artículo amplía esas recientes investigaciones, para postular que la Detroit de Jarmusch es una ciudad estéticamente inorgánica. Siguiendo a grandes rasgos los lineamientos de Wilhelm Worringer, se analiza (...)
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  24. Apuntes para una interpretación axiológica del arte.José Ramón Fabelo Corzo - 2011 - In Cynthia Pech & Vivian Romeu (eds.), Lo comunicativo, lo artístico y lo estético. Parte III: Práctica y recepción del arte. Reflexión y análisis. México: pp. 27-40.
    Se trata de un estudio aproximativo al tema de la naturaleza axiológica del arte y la relación dentro de él entre valores estéticos y otros valores.
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  25. La industria cultural y su relación con el valor de la producción musical.José Ramón Fabelo Corzo & Ernesto García Cabrera - 2013 - In Ramón Patiño Espino & José Antonio Pérez Diestre (eds.), Universalidad y variedad en la estética y el arte. Puebla, Pue., México: pp. 259-266.
    El trabajo cuestiona críticamente cierta visión extrema y unilateral apreciable en Adorno y Horkheimer al juzgar la relación de la industria cultural con la música. Es cierto que hoy prácticamente toda actividad humana se encuentra condiciona¬da por el mercado y que la música no es una excepción. Ella también es portadora de valor de cambio que tiende a ser dominante en los marcos de la industrial cultural. Pero es plausible que dentro de las industrias culturales mismas se empezara a hacer (...)
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  26. Teatro y Estética del Oprimido. Homenaje a Augusto Boal.José Ramón Fabelo Corzo & Ana Lucero López Troncoso (eds.) - 2016 - Puebla, Pue., México: Colección La Fuente, BUAP.
    Este libro inaugura la serie Homenaje de la Colección La Fuente. Con él se busca reconocer, de manera particular, al pensador, dramaturgo y director brasileño Augusto Boal (1931-2009), creador del teatro y la estética del oprimido, genuina aportación cultural latinoamericana que mucho tiene que ver con ese particular lugar de enunciación que es Nuestra América y sus siempre actuales expectativas emancipadoras. El libro fue precedido y nutrido por un Coloquio que en mayo de 2014 reunió a importantes especialistas y seguidores (...)
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  27. Aproximación teórica a la especificidad de los valores estéticos.José Ramón Fabelo Corzo - 2004 - Graffylia 4 (4):17-25.
    El artículo busca acercarse a la comprensión de los rasgos particulares de los valores estéticos, fundamentalmente en las obras de arte. Para ello parte de la premisa de que el valor estético no es en sí mismo un atributo del objeto artístico, ni el resultado exclusivo de la plasmación en él de cierto ideal estético. Para que un objeto sea portador de valor estético ha de funcionar precisamente como tal, lo cual presupone la presencia y participación de otros sujetos que (...)
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  28. ¿Qué hacer con el legado teórico-práctico de Augusto Boal? (A modo de Presentación).José Ramón Fabelo Corzo & Ana Lucero López Troncoso - 2016 - In José Ramón Fabelo Corzo & Ana Lucero López Troncoso (eds.), Teatro y Estética del Oprimido. Homenaje a Augusto Boal. Puebla, Pue., México: pp. 11-21.
    El texto sirve como capítulo introductorio y de presentación del libro Teatro y Estética del Oprimido. Homenaje a Augusto Boal. Se reflexiona y evalúa críticamente sobre los diferentes "usos" que se hacen del legado teórico-práctico de Augusto Boal, lo que se hace y lo que, ajuicio de los autores, se debe hacer con él. Se describe además las fuentes y el contenido capitular del libro en cuestión.
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  29. Aesthetic Truth Through the Ages: A Lonerganian Theory of Art History.Ryan Miller - forthcoming - Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association 94 (2020).
    Classical authors were generally artistic realists. The predominant aesthetic theory was mimesis, which saw the truth of art as its successful representation of reality. High modernists rejected this aesthetic theory as lifeless, seeing the truth of art as its subjective expression. This impasse has serious consequences for both the Church and the public square. Moving forward requires both, first, an appreciation of the strengths and weaknesses of the high modernist critique of classical mimetic theory, and, second, a theory of truth (...)
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  30. The Normative Significance of Flatulence: Aesthetics, Etiquette, and Ethics.Karl Pfeifer - 2020 - IAFOR Journal of Arts and Humanities 7 (1):17-25.
    Proceeding on the basis of reports of a proposal in 2011 to criminalize public flatulence in Malawi, the normative significance of flatulence is considered from the respective standpoints of aesthetics, etiquette, and ethics, and it is indicated how aesthetics and etiquette may themselves also have ethical significance. It is concluded that etiquette and ethics may both require that certain violations of etiquette and ethics should sometimes be ignored.
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  31. Vergegenwärtigung von Erfahrungen, Perspektivenübernahme und Empathie.Íngrid Vendrell-Ferran - 2018 - In Susanne Schmetkamp & Magdalena Zorn (eds.), Variationen des Mitfühlens. Empathie in Musik, Literatur, Film und Sprache. Mainz, Stuttgart: Franz Steiner Verlag.
    Der Aufsatz ist in zwei Teile gegliedert. Im ersten Teil unterscheide ich das Phänomen der Empathie von ähnlichen Phänomenen. Im zweiten Teil werde ich auf die Bedingungen für Empathie eingehen. In diesem Teil geht es mir darum zu zeigen, dass wir es trotz einiger Unterschiede zwischen Empathie für Mitmenschen und Empathie für Figuren mit demselben Phänomen zu tun haben.
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  32. The Return of the Translator : From the Edge of Meaning to the Edge of Sense.Srajana Kaikini - 2017 - In Marianna Maruyama (ed.), Kunstlicht Special Issue : Translation as Method. Amsterdam, Netherlands: pp. 10 - 25.
    "Translation, as with any practice, is something to return to again and again. Opening this issue, curator and poet Srajana Kaikini’s multi-layered article, ‘The Return of the Translator’ underlines the relevance of translation as a critical process, available to anyone, in any field. Bringing in references to philosopher Sundar Sarukkai, poet Gangadhar Chittal, and Buddhist philosophical principles, she locates the place of translation. Kaikini looks closely at the ways “language and the world are in strange relation with each other,” to (...)
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  33. Can Literature Be Moral Philosophy? A Sceptical View on the Ethics of Literary Empathy.Ingrid Vendrell Ferran - 2011 - In Sebastian Hüsch (ed.), Philosophy and Literature and the Crisis of Metaphysics.
    One important aspect of Nussbaum´s thesis on the moral value of literature concerns the power of literature to enhance our ability to empathise with other minds. This aspect will be the focus of the current article. My aim is to reflect upon this question regarding the moral value of our empathy for fictional characters. The article is structured in two main parts. I will first examine the concept of “empathy” and distinguish between empathy for human beings and empathy for fictional (...)
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  34. Spur, Zeugnis Und Imagination: Der Erkenntniswert von Dokumentarfilmen.Íngrid Vendrell-Ferran - 2020 - Zeitschrift für Ästhetik Und Allgemeine Kunstwissenschaft 65 (1).
    In diesem Aufsatz argumentiere ich für die These, dass alle Dokumentarfilme darauf abzielen, uns Erkenntnis über einen Aspekt der Realität zu vermitteln. Dieser These zufolge sind Dokumentarfilme – im Unterschied zu anderen Filmgattungen – der Wirklichkeit verpflichtet. Vor diesem Hintergrund sollen in diesem Aufsatz zwei Aspekte genauer untersucht werden: zum einen, wie der kognitive Wert von Dokumentarfilmen genauer zu verstehen ist, und zum anderen, inwiefern ausgehend von diesem epistemischen Aspekt Unterscheidungskriterien zwischen Dokumentarfilmen und anderen Filmgattungen entwickelt werden können. Der Aufsatz (...)
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  35. Introduction: The Place of Beauty in Contemporary Aesthetics.Ingrid Vendrell Ferran & Wolfgang Huemer - 2019 - In Wolfgang Huemer & Íngrid Vendrell Ferran (eds.), Beauty. New Essays in Aesthetics and the Philosophy of Art. München, Deutschland:
    The notion of beauty has endured a troublesome history over the last few decades. While for centuries beauty has been considered one of the central values of art, there have also been times when it seemed old-fashioned to even mention the term. The present volume aims to explore the nature of beauty and to shed light its place in contemporary philosphy and art practice.
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  36. Pragmatist Aesthetics and the Experience of Technology.David L. Hildebrand - 2018 - In Anders Buch & Theodore Schatzki (eds.), Questions of Practice in Philosophy and Social Theory. New York, NY, USA: pp. 114-135.
    Abstract: For most people, mobile phones and various forms of personal information technology (PIT) have become standard equipment for everyday life. Recent theorists such as Sherry Turkle raise psychological and philosophical questions about the impact of such technologies and practices, but deeper further philosophical work is needed. This paper takes a pragmatic approach to examining the effects of PIT practices upon experience. After reviewing several main issues with technology raised by Communication theorists, the paper looks more deeply at Turkle’s analysis (...)
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  37. Independência: libertação da arte na dimensão estética de Herbert Marcuse.Jair Soares - 2018 - Revista Diaphonía.
    Abstract: According to Marcuse, esthetics is an essential component to the process of freedom of consciousness and behavior of individuals. It is, in Hegelian language, to free the absolute spirit. In this sense, art configures itself as fantasy, which makes the “apparent” reveal the essence of things. Essence here is understood not as a metaphysical field, but as an unveiling of questions, within a false truth of the (establishment), in the totality of relationships. In dialectical terms, art manifests itself in (...)
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  38. Is Understanding Reducible?Lewis D. Ross - 2020 - Inquiry: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy 63 (2):117-135.
    Despite playing an important role in epistemology, philosophy of science, and more recently in moral philosophy and aesthetics, the nature of understanding is still much contested. One attractive framework attempts to reduce understanding to other familiar epistemic states. This paper explores and develops a methodology for testing such reductionist theories before offering a counterexample to a recently defended variant on which understanding reduces to what an agent knows.
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  39. Outline of a Theory of Scientific Aesthetics.Gustavo Romero - 2018 - Foundations of Science 23 (4):795-807.
    I offer a theory of art that is based on science. I maintain that, as any other human activity, art can be studied with the tools of science. This does not mean that art is scientific, but aesthetics, the theory of art, can be formulated in accord with our scientific knowledge. I present elucidations of the concepts of aesthetic experience, art, work of art, artistic movement, and I discuss the ontological status of artworks from the point of view of scientific (...)
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  40. Gusto. Pensare la frattura. [REVIEW]Fabio Vergine - 2015 - Doppiozero 1.
    Recensione del testo di Giorgio Agamben, "Gusto".
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  41. Games: Agency as Art.C. Thi Nguyen - 2020 - New York: Oxford University Press.
    Games occupy a unique and valuable place in our lives. Game designers do not simply create worlds; they design temporary selves. Game designers set what our motivations are in the game and what our abilities will be. Thus: games are the art form of agency. By working in the artistic medium of agency, games can offer a distinctive aesthetic value. They support aesthetic experiences of deciding and doing. -/- And the fact that we play games shows something remarkable about us. (...)
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  42. Towards Gratitude to Nature: Global Environmental Ethics for China and the World.Bo R. Meinertsen - 2017 - Frontiers of Philosophy in China 12 (2):207-223.
    This paper asks what should be the basis of a global environmental ethics. As Gao Shan has argued, the environmental ethics of Western philosophers such as Holmes Rolston and Paul Taylor is based on extending the notion of intrinsic value to that of objects of nature, and as such it is not very compatible with Chinese ethics. This is related to Gao’s rejection of most—if not all—Western “rationalist” environmental ethics, a stance that I grant her for pragmatic reasons (though I (...)
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  43. Experimental Philosophy of Aesthetics.Florian Cova, Amanda Garcia & Shen-yi Liao - 2015 - Philosophy Compass 10 (12):927-939.
    In the past decade, experimental philosophy---the attempt at making progress on philosophical problems using empirical methods---has thrived in a wide range of domains. However, only in recent years has aesthetics succeeded in drawing the attention of experimental philosophers. The present paper constitutes the first survey of these works and of the nascent field of 'experimental philosophy of aesthetics'. We present both recent experimental works by philosophers on topics such as the ontology of aesthetics, aesthetic epistemology, aesthetic concepts, and imagination, as (...)
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  44. Aesthetic Adjectives.Louise McNally & Isidora Stojanovic - 2014 - In James Young (ed.), The Semantics of Aesthetic Judgment. Oxford University Press.
    Among semanticists and philosophers of language, there has been a recent outburst of interest in predicates such as delicious, called predicates of personal taste (PPTs, e.g. Lasersohn 2005). Somewhat surprisingly, the question of whether or how we can distinguish aesthetic predicates from PPTs has hardly been addressed at all in this recent work. It is precisely this question that we address. We investigate linguistic criteria that we argue can be used to delineate the class of specifically aesthetic adjectives. We show (...)
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  45. The Relationship Between Aesthetic Value and Cognitive Value.Antony Aumann - 2014 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 72 (2):117-127.
    Recent attention to the relationship between aesthetic value and cognitive value has focused on whether the latter can affect the former. In this article, I approach the issue from the opposite direction. I investigate whether the aesthetic value of a work can influence its cognitive value. More narrowly, I consider whether a work's aesthetic value ever contributes to or detracts from its philosophical value, which I take to include the truth of its claims, the strength of its arguments, and its (...)
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  46. The Limits of Faultless Disagreement.Carl Baker - manuscript
    Some have argued that the possibility of faultless disagreement gives relativist semantic theories an important explanatory advantage over their absolutist and contextualist rivals. Here I combat this argument, focusing on the specific case of aesthetic discourse. My argument has two stages. First, I argue that while relativists may be able to account for the possibility of faultless aesthetic disagreement, they nevertheless face difficulty in accounting for the intuitive limits of faultless disagreement. Second, I develop a new non-relativist theory which can (...)
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  47. Perceptual Principles as the Basis for Genuine Judgments of Beauty.Jennifer A. McMahon - 2000 - Journal of Consciousness Studies 7 (8-9):8-9.
    This paper comments on an article by V.S. Ramachandran and William Hirstein (JCS,1999) in which they purport to be identifying the neurological principles of beauty. I draw attention to the way the problem of beauty is construed in the philosophical literature by Mary Mothersill (1984) and Immanuel Kant (Critique of Judgment). I argue that Ramachandran and Hirsteins' principles do not address the problem of beauty because they do not differentiate between the experience of beauty and other closely related phenomena. I (...)
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Aesthetic Criticism
  1. Aesthetic Knowledge.Keren Gorodeisky & Eric Marcus - forthcoming - Philosophical Studies:1-29.
    What is the source of aesthetic knowledge? Empirical knowledge, it is generally held, bottoms out in perception. Such knowledge can be transmitted to others through testimony, preserved by memory, and amplified via inference. But perception is where the rubber hits the road. What about aesthetic knowledge? Does it too bottom out in perception? Most say “yes”. But this is wrong. When it comes to aesthetic knowledge, it is appreciation, not perception, where the rubber hits the road. The ultimate source of (...)
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  2. The Art of Immoral Artists.Shen-yi Liao - forthcoming - In Carl Fox & Joe Saunders (eds.), The Routledge Handbook of Philosophy and Media Ethics. New York: Routledge.
    The primary aim of this chapter is to outline the consensuses that have emerged in recent philosophical works tackling normative questions about responding to immoral artist’s art. While disagreement amongst philosophers is unavoidable, there is actually much agreement on the ethics of media consumption. How should we evaluate immoral artist’s art? Philosophers generally agree that we should not always separate the artist from the art. How should we engage with immoral artist’s art? Philosophers generally agree that we should not always (...)
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  3. Immoral Artists.Erich Hatala Matthes - forthcoming - In James Harold (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of Ethics and Art.
    This chapter offers an overview of issues posed by the problem of immoral artists, artists who in word or deed violate commonly held moral principles. I briefly consider the question of whether the immorality of an artist can render their work aesthetically worse (making connections to chapters in the Theory section of the handbook), and then turn to questions about what the audience should do and feel in response to knowledge of these moral failings. I discuss questions such as whether (...)
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