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  1. added 2019-04-13
    Kant's Empirical Moral Philosophy.Sergio Volodia Marcello Cremaschi - 2003 - In Boran Bercić & Nenad Smokrovic (eds.), Proceedings of Rijeka Conference "Knowledge, Existence and Action". Rijeka, Croatia: Hrvatsko drustvo za analiticku filozofiju - Filozofski fakultet Rijeka. pp. 21-24.
    I argue that Kant took from Moses Mendelssohn the idea of a distinction between geometry of morals and a practical ethic. He was drastically misunderstood by his followers precisely on this point. He had learned from the sceptics and the Jansenists the lesson that men are prompted to act by deceptive ends, and he was aware that human actions are also empirical phenomena, where laws like the laws of Nature may be detected. His practical ethics made room for judgment as (...)
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  2. added 2018-03-27
    Sobre a recepção do conceito de Verantwortlichkeit de Wilhelm Windelband na antinomia das éticas da convicção e da responsabilidade de Max Weber/The reception of Wilhelm Windelband’s concept of Verantwortlichkeit in Max Weber’s antinomy between the ethic of conviction and the ethic of responsibility.Luis F. Roselino - 2013 - Seara Filosófica 7:1-12.
    In the following pages, the main proposal is to indicate how Max Weber has dialogued directly with some prerogatives from Kant’s Critic of practical Reason, following the reception of Wilhelm Windelband’s concept of “responsibility” (Verantwortlichkeit) and his theory of values. In sight of these influences, in this paper will be argued how Weber adherence to the neo-Kantian value concept has made possible a review on the categorical imperatives, which has turned his reading from Kantian philosophy to the proposal of an (...)
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  3. added 2018-03-23
    Kant and the Foundations of Morality. [REVIEW]Samuel Kahn - 2018 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 26 (2):403-405.
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  4. added 2017-02-19
    Kant on ‘Good’, the Good, and the Duty to Promote the Highest Good.Pauline Kleingeld - 2016 - In Thomas Höwing (ed.), The Highest Good in Kant’s Philosophy. Berlin: De Gruyter. pp. 33-50.
    Many regard Kant’s account of the highest good as a failure. His inclusion of happiness in the highest good, in combination with his claim that it is a duty to promote the highest good, is widely seen as inconsistent. In this essay, I argue that there is a valid argument, based on premises Kant clearly endorses, in defense of his thesis that it is a duty to promote the highest good. I first examine why Kant includes happiness in the highest (...)
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  5. added 2015-07-19
    Kant on Virtue and the Virtues.Thomas E. Hill & Adam Cureton - 2014 - In Nancy Snow (ed.), Cultivating Virtue: Multiple Perspectives. pp. 87-110.
    Immanuel Kant is known for his ideas about duty and morally worthy acts, but his conception of virtue is less familiar. Nevertheless Kant’s understanding of virtue is quite distinctive and has considerable merit compared to the most familiar conceptions. Kant also took moral education seriously, writing extensively on both the duty of adults to cultivate virtue and the empirical conditions to prepare children for this life-long responsibility. Our aim is, first, to explain Kant’s conception of virtue, second, to highlight some (...)
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  6. added 2014-11-22
    Kantian Reasons for Reasons.Noell Birondo - 2007 - Ratio 20 (3):264–277.
    Rüdiger Bittner has recently argued against a Kantian ‘maxims account’ of reasons for action. In this paper I argue—against Bittner—that Kantian maxims are not to be understood as reasons for action, but rather as reasons for reasons. On the interpretation presented here, Kantian maxims are the reasons for an agent’s being motivated by whatever more immediate reasons actually motivate her. This understanding of Kantian maxims suggests a recognizably realist Kantian position in ethics.
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  7. added 2014-07-06
    The Truth About Kant On Lies.James Edwin Mahon - 2009 - In Clancy W. Martin (ed.), The Philosophy of Deception. Oxford University Press.
    In this chapter I argue that there are three different senses of 'lie' in Kant's moral philosophy: the lie in the ethical sense (the broadest sense, which includes lies to oneself), the lie in the 'juristic' sense (the narrowest sense, which only includes lies that specifically harm particular others), and the lie in the sense of right (or justice), which is narrower than the ethical sense, but broader than the juristic sense, since it includes all lies told to others, including (...)
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