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  1. Marching on the Capital: Hume's Experimental Science of Man as a Conquest for Occupied Territory.Gabriel Watts - 2020 - Journal of Scottish Philosophy 18 (3):233-255.
    In this paper I set out what I call a ‘conquest’ conception of Hume's experimental science of man. It is notable, I claim, that Hume regards what he calls the ‘capital’ of the sciences – ‘the science of MAN’ – as occupied territory, and that he views his ‘direct’ method of approach upon the science of human nature as a ‘conquest’. I expand upon such statements by leveraging the comparison that Hume draws between experimental moral philosophy and the experimental tradition (...)
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  • Caricatures, Myths, and White Lies.Kirsten Walsh & Adrian Currie - 2015 - Metaphilosophy 46 (3):414-435.
    Pedagogical situations require white lies: in teaching philosophy we make decisions about what to omit, what to emphasise, and what to distort. This article considers when it is permissible to distort the historical record, arguing for a tempered respect for the historical facts. It focuses on the rationalist/empiricist distinction, which still frames most undergraduate early modern courses despite failing to capture the intellectual history of that period. It draws an analogy with Michael Strevens's view on idealisation in causal explanation to (...)
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  • Scientistic Philosophy, No; Scientific Philosophy, Yes.Susan Haack - 2021 - Philosophical Investigations 15 (36):4-35.
    If successful scientific inquiry is to be possible, there must be a world that is independent of how we believe it to be, and in which there are kinds and laws; and we must have the sensory apparatus to perceive particular things and events, and the capacity to represent them, to form generalized explanatory conjectures, and check how these conjectures stand up to further experience. Whether these preconditions are met is not a question the sciences can answer; it is specifically (...)
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  • De Volder’s Cartesian Physics and Experimental Pedagogy.Tammy Nyden - 2014 - In Mihnea Dobre Tammy Nyden (ed.), Cartesian Empiricisms. Springer.
    In 1675, Burchard de Volder (1643–1709) was the first professor to introduce the demonstration of experiment into a university physics course and built the Leiden Physics Theatre to accommodate this new pedagogy. When he requested the funds from the university to build the facility, he claimed that the performance of experiments would demonstrate the “truth and certainty” of the postulates of theoretical physics. Such a claim is interesting given de Volder’s lifelong commitment to Cartesian scientia. This chapter will examine de (...)
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  • David Hume y la distinción entre filosofía especulativa y experimental.Sofía Beatriz Calvente - 2018 - Dianoia 63 (81):109-131.
    Resumen: Ante las críticas insistentes a la distinción entre el empirismo y el racionalismo, se han propuesto alternativas para comprender de manera más adecuada el quehacer de los filósofos modernos. Entre ellas está la distinción entre filosofía especulativa y experimental. Intentaré evaluar la validez de esta distinción para la filosofía moral experimental del siglo XVIII y, en particular, para la propuesta de Hume. Mostraré que si la distinción se entiende en términos excluyentes, resulta inapropiada porque el mismo Hume plantea que (...)
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  • Locke on Measurement.Peter R. Anstey - 2016 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 60:70-81.
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  • Experimental Pedagogy and the Eclipse of Robert Boyle in England.Peter R. Anstey - 2015 - Intellectual History Review 25 (1):115-131.
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  • Jane Addams as Experimental Philosopher.Joshua August Skorburg - 2018 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 26 (5):918-938.
    This paper argues that the activist, feminist and pragmatist Jane Addams was an experimental philosopher. To defend this claim, I argue for capacious notions of both philosophical pragmatism and experimental philosophy. I begin in Section 2 with a new defence of Rose and Danks’ [‘In Defense of a Broad Conception of Experimental Philosophy’. Metaphilosophy 44, no. 4 : 512–32] argument in favour of a broad conception of experimental philosophy. Koopman [‘Pragmatist Resources for Experimental Philosophy: Inquiry in Place of Intuition’. Journal (...)
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  • D'Alembert, the “Preliminary Discourse” and Experimental Philosophy.Peter R. Anstey - 2014 - Intellectual History Review 24 (4):495-516.
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  • “Experimental Philosophy”: Invention and Rebirth of a Seventeenth-Century Concept.Mordechai Feingold - 2016 - Early Science and Medicine 21 (1):1-28.
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  • Experiment, Speculation, and Galileo’s Scientific Reasoning.Gregory Dawes - 2016 - Perspectives on Science 24 (3):343-360.
    Peter Anstey has suggested that in our analyses of early modern natural philosophy we should abandon a frequently used distinction: that between rationalism and empiricism. He argues that we should replace it with another distinction, that between experimental and speculative natural philosophy. The second distinction, he argues, was not only widely used at the time, but has a greater explanatory range. It follows, he suggests, that it is a better way of “carving up” the writings of that period.It is clear (...)
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  • The Lost Liquid Cosmogony of Johannes Daniel Schlichting.Justin Begley - 2020 - Perspectives on Science 28 (5):571-609.
    The focus of this paper is a fascinating but hitherto unstudied 1742 manuscript treatise by Johannes Daniel Schlichting titled “Sapientiæ Problema” that contains something extremely rare in the mid-eighteenth century: a full-blown speculative cosmogony. As this article reveals, Schlichting developed a distinctive vital liquid matter in an effort to account for the generation of all natural bodies and combat the stamina-based theories that were dominant in his day. He hoped that his treatise would be published in the Philosophical Transactions of (...)
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  • Francis Bacon, Early Modern Baconians and the Idols of Baconian Scholarship: Introductory Study.Dana Jalobeanu - 2013 - Society and Politics 7 (2013).
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  • Philosophy and the Sciences in the Work of Gilles Deleuze, 1953-1968.David James Allen - unknown
    This thesis seeks to understand the nature of and relation between science and philosophy articulated in the early work of the French philosopher Gilles Deleuze. It seeks to challenge the view that Deleuze’s metaphysical and metaphilosophical position is in important part an attempt to respond to twentieth century developments in the natural sciences, claiming that this is not a plausible interpretation of Deleuze’s early thought. The central problem identified with such readings is that they provide an insufficient explanation of the (...)
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  • On Glass-Drops: A Case Study of the Interplay Between Experimentation and Explanation in Seventeenth-Century Natural Philosophy.Mihnea Dobre - 2013 - Journal of Early Modern Studies 2 (1):105-124.
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  • John Hill (1714?–1775) on ‘Plant Sleep’: Experimental Physiology and the Limits of Comparative Analysis.Justin Begley - 2020 - Annals of Science 77:1-23.
    The phenomenon of ‘plant sleep’ – whereby vegetables rhythmically open and close their leaves or petals in daily cycles – has been a continual source of fascination for those with botanical interests, from the Portuguese physician Cristóbal Acosta and the Italian naturalist Prospero Alpini in the sixteenth century to Percy Bysshe Shelley and Charles Darwin in the nineteenth. But it was in 1757 that the topic received its earliest systemic treatment on English shores with the prodigious author, botanist, actor, and (...)
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  • John Hill (1714?–1775) on ‘Plant Sleep’: Experimental Physiology and the Limits of Comparative Analysis.Justin Begley - 2021 - Annals of Science 78 (1):41-63.
    ABSTRACT The phenomenon of ‘plant sleep’ – whereby vegetables rhythmically open and close their leaves or petals in daily cycles – has been a continual source of fascination for those with botanical interests, from the Portuguese physician Cristóbal Acosta and the Italian naturalist Prospero Alpini in the sixteenth century to Percy Bysshe Shelley and Charles Darwin in the nineteenth. But it was in 1757 that the topic received its earliest systemic treatment on English shores with the prodigious author, botanist, actor, (...)
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  • Newtonian and Non-Newtonian Elements in Hume.Matias Slavov - 2016 - Journal of Scottish Philosophy 14 (3):275-296.
    For the last forty years, Hume's Newtonianism has been a debated topic in Hume scholarship. The crux of the matter can be formulated by the following question: Is Hume a Newtonian philosopher? Debates concerning this question have produced two lines of interpretation. I shall call them ‘traditional’ and ‘critical’ interpretations. The traditional interpretation asserts that there are many Newtonian elements in Hume, whereas the critical interpretation seriously questions this. In this article, I consider the main points made by both lines (...)
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