Switch to: References

Add citations

You must login to add citations.
  1. Philosophical Writing: Prefacing as Professing.Rob McCormack - 2008 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 40 (7):832-855.
    If you do not wish to construe philosophical discourse as simply a discourse of cognition, a theoretical discourse; if you think it is also a practical, ethical discourse: how should you write? How should you frame the ethos, the authority of your discourse? This article re‐presents an extended preface I wrote and rewrote obsessively over a period of nearly two years in an effort to forge a voice and mode of address adequate to my sense of philosophical discourse as a (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Dangerous Carers: Pastoral Power and the Caring Teacher of Contemporary Australian Schooling.Louise Anne Mccuaig - 2012 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 44 (8):862-877.
    Whilst care imperatives have arisen across the breadth of Western societies, within the education sector they appear both prolific and urgent. This paper explores the deployment of care discourses within education generally and draws upon the case of Australian Health and Physical Education more specifically, to undertake a Foucauldian interrogation of care. In so doing I demonstrate the usefulness of Foucault's pastoral power lens and its capacity to provide insight into the moral and ethical work conducted by caring teachers on (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • A Chariot for the Shekhinah: Identity and the Ideal Life in Sixteenth-Century Kabbalah: Essays.Eitan P. Fishbane - 2009 - Journal of Religious Ethics 37 (3):385-418.
    In this paper, I seek to present the range of issues involved in the efforts of sixteenth-century kabbalists to understand the nature of selfhood, and the paths prescribed for the formation of an ideal life. I reflect on the mystical writings of Moshe Cordovero, Eliyahu de Vidas, and ayyim Vital—probing their conceptions of core identity, the polarity between body and soul, and the ethical guidance for a life well lived. In so doing, I consider the following additional themes, and their (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • The Relationship of Risk to Rules, Values, Virtues, and Moral Complexity: What We can Learn from the Moral Struggles of Military Leaders.Kate Robinson, Bernard McKenna & David Rooney - forthcoming - Journal of Business Ethics:1-18.
    Leaders are faced with ethical and moral dilemmas daily, like those within the military who must span from large-scale combat operations to security cooperation and deterrence. For businesses, these dilemmas can include social and environmental impact such as those in mining; and for governments, the social and economic impact of their decision-making in their response to COVID-19. The move by Western defence forces to align their foundational principles, policies, and “soldier” dispositions with the changing values of the countries they serve (...)
    Download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Therapeutic Arguments, Spiritual Exercises, or the Care of the Self. Martha Nussbaum, Pierre Hadot and Michel Foucault on Ancient Philosophy.Konrad Banicki - 2015 - Ethical Perspectives 22 (4):601-634.
    The practical aspect of ancient philosophy has been recently made a focus of renewed metaphilosophical investigation. After a brief presentation of three accounts of this kind developed by Martha Nussbaum, Pierre Hadot, and Michel Foucault, the model of the therapeutic argument developed by Nussbaum is called into question from the perspectives offered by her French colleagues, who emphasize spiritual exercise (Hadot) or the care of the self (Foucault). The ways in which the account of Nussbaum can be defended are then (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  • Exemplars, Ethics, and Illness Narratives.Ian Kidd - 2017 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 38 (4):323-334.
    Many people report that reading first-person narratives of the experience of illness can be morally instructive or educative. But although they are ubiquitous and typically sincere, the precise nature of such educative experiences is puzzling—for those narratives typically lack the features that modern philosophers regard as constitutive of moral reason. I argue that such puzzlement should disappear, and the morally educative power of illness narratives explained, if one distinguishes two different styles of moral reason: an inferentialist style that generates the (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   11 citations  
  • Anagogic Love Between Neoplatonic Philosophers and Their Disciples in Late Antiquity.Donka Markus - 2016 - International Journal of the Platonic Tradition 10 (1):1-39.
    _ Source: _Volume 10, Issue 1, pp 1 - 39 Through a novel set of texts drawn from Plato, Porphyry, Plotinus, Ps. Julian, Proclus, Hermeias, Synesius and Damascius, I explore how anagogic _erōs_ in master-disciple relationships in Neoplatonism contributed to the attainment of self-knowledge and to the transmission of knowledge, authority and inspired insights within and outside the _diadochia_. I view anagogic _erōs_ as one of the most important channels of non-discursive pedagogy and argue for the mediating power of anagogic (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Species Extinction and the Vice of Thoughtlessness: The Importance of Spiritual Exercises for Learning Virtue. [REVIEW]Jeremy Bendik-Keymer - 2009 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 23 (1-2):61-83.
    In this paper, I present a sample spiritual exercise—a contemporary form of the written practice that ancient philosophers used to shape their characters. The exercise, which develops the ancient practice of the examination of conscience, is on the sixth mass extinction and seeks to understand why the extinction appears as a moral wrong. It concludes by finding a vice in the moral character of the author and the author’s society. From a methodological standpoint, the purpose of spiritual exercises is to (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • Self-Transformation: Body, Mind, and Spirit.William Konchak - 2017 - Journal of Applied Hermeneutics 2017 (1).
    In this paper, I explore a conception of self-transformation that attempts to provide a holistic account covering a range of body, mind, and spirit. I draw upon Kym Maclaren’s exploration of the role of the body inspired by the work of Maurice Merleau-Ponty ; the hermeneutics of Hans-Georg Gadamer ; and Ralph Waldo Emerson’s transcendentalism. I present the case that each of these approaches develops important aspects of self-transformation and can be seen as complementary. I explore this in relation to (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Histories and Freedom of the Present: Foucault and Skinner.Naja Vucina, Claus Drejer & Peter Triantafillou - 2011 - History of the Human Sciences 24 (5):0952695111415176.
    This article compares the ways in which Michel Foucault’s and Quentin Skinner’s historical analyses seek to unsettle the limits on present forms of freedom. We do so by comparing their ways of analysing discourse, rationality and agency. The two authors differ significantly in the ways they deal with these three phenomena. The most significant difference lies in their ways of addressing agency and its relationship to power. Notwithstanding these differences, the historical analyses of both authors seek to problematize the ways (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Reflexive Historical Sociology: Consciousness, Experience and the Author.Peter McMylor - 2005 - History of the Human Sciences 18 (4):141-160.
    This article examines the recent work of the sociologist Arpad Szakolczai as he attempts to conceptualize the programme of ‘reflexive historical sociology’ in the ‘life-works’ of Max Weber, Eric Voegelin and Michel Foucault as well as Norbert Elias, Lewis Mumford and Franz Borkenau. Particular attention is paid to the innovative manner in which the work of the anthropologist Victor Turner is used to explore the biographies of these social theorists as in effect performative life-works in which crucial liminal periods and (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • German Idealism Meets Indian Vedanta and Kasmiri Saivism.Katherine Elise Barhydt & J. M. Fritzman - 2013 - Comparative Philosophy 4 (2).
    0 0 1 152 943 Lewis & Clark College 21 2 1093 14.0 Normal 0 false false false EN-US JA X-NONE Regarding each philosophy as a variation of that of Spinoza , t his article compares the German Idealism of Schelling and Hegel with the Indian Ved ā nta of Śaṅkara and Rāmānuja, as well as Abhinavagupta’s Kaśmiri Śaivism. It argues that only Hegel’s philosophy does not fail. For Śaṅkara, Rāmānuja, Abhinavagupta, and Schelling, the experience of ultimate reality—Brahman for Śaṅkara (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Philosophy in Schools: Then and Now.Megan J. Laverty - 2014 - Journal of Philosophy in Schools 1 (1):107-130.
    It is twelve years since the article you are about to read was published. During that time, the philosophy in schools movement has expanded and diversified in response to curriculum developments, teaching guides, web-based resources, dissertations, empirical research and theoretical scholarship. Philosophy and philosophy of education journals regularly publish articles and special issues on pre-college philosophy. There are more opportunities for undergraduate and graduate philosophy students to practice and research philosophy for/with children in schools. The Ontario Philosophy Teachers Association reports (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • The Emergence of Emerging Philosophical Moments and the Emerging Philosophizing : Preliminary Notes.Elena Theodoropoulou & Sofia Nikolidaki - 2017 - Childhood and Philosophy 13 (26):153-165.
    This paper aims at introducing the idea of Emerging Philosophizing as a way of naming, describing, developing and further understanding the process of having philosophical moments occurring instantly and coming directly from children in the classroom. On this ground, the main characteristics of philosophizing as developed in the frame of EmPhil along with its differences among other forms of philosophizing are briefly discussed. The conceptualization of EmPhil can be grounded in philosophies that explore the process of thinking as emergence, doing (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Michel Foucault y la gramática del poder y de la libertad.Luciana Cadahia - 2014 - Estudios de Filosofía (Universidad de Antioquia) 49:33-48.
    En este artículo se trata de investigar qué tipo de relación conceptual es posible determinar entre la noción de poder y la noción de libertad en los últimos trabajos Michel Foucault. La propuesta es mostrar que determinados textos de Foucault permiten establecer un vínculo especulativo entre ambos términos, entendiendo por ello que éstos sólo tienen lugar en su mutua interrelación y no existen fuera de ella. Esto supone, a su vez, señalar las limitaciones de aquellas interpretaciones que o bien se (...)
    Download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Sheathing the Sword: Augustine and the Good Judge.Veronica Roberts Ogle - 2018 - Journal of Religious Ethics 46 (4):718-747.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Experience and Truthtelling.Mariana Valverde - 2002 - Outlines. Critical Practice Studies 4 (1):3-18.
    This is a Foucault-inspired, postmodern study of ethical subjectivity. Technologies of life, personal truths and relations between truth telling and intoxication are highlighted in drug autobiographies and in materials from a study of Alcoholics Anonymous. Here other notions of the self are at play than the concept of the unified, autonomous, authentic self. These materials also offer an understanding of addiction as a dysfunction or disorganisation of temporality in everyday life.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  • Feminist Philosophy and the Philosophy of Feminism: Irigaray and the History of Western Metaphysics.Claire Colebrook - 1997 - Hypatia 12 (1):79 - 98.
    Irigaray demonstrates that metaphysics depends upon the specific negation and exclusion of the female body. Readings of Irigaray's Speculum of the Other Woman tend to highlight the status of this excluded materiality: is there an essential female body which precedes negation or is the feminine only an effect of exclusion? I approach Irigaray's work by way of another question: is it possible to move beyond a feminist critique of metaphysics and towards a feminist philosophy?
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  • On Comparative Religious Ethics as a Field of Study.Elizabeth M. Bucar & Aaron Stalnaker - 2014 - Journal of Religious Ethics 42 (2):358-384.
    This essay is a critical engagement with recent assessments of comparative religious ethics by John Kelsay and Jung Lee. Contra Kelsay's proposal to return to a neo-Weberian sociology of religious norm elaboration and justification, the authors argue that comparative religious ethics is and should be practiced as a field of study in active conversation with other fields that consider human flourishing, employing a variety of methods that have their roots in multiple disciplines. Cross-pollination from a variety of disciplines is a (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   8 citations  
  • "We Are All Noah: Tom Regan's Olive Branch to Religious Animal Ethics".Matthew C. Halteman - 2018 - Between the Species 21 (1):151-177.
    For the past thirty years, the late Tom Regan bucked the trend among secular animal rights philosophers and spoke patiently and persistently to the best angels of religious ethics in a stream of publications that enjoins religious scholars, clergy, and lay people alike to rediscover the resources within their traditions for articulating and living out an animal ethics that is more consistent with their professed values of love, mercy, and justice. My aim in this article is to showcase some of (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Variations in Philosophical Genre: The Platonic Dialogue.Dylan Brian Futter - 2015 - Metaphilosophy 46 (2):246-262.
    The primary function of the Platonic dialogue is not the communication of philosophical doctrines but the transformation of the reader's character. This article takes up the question of how, or by what means, the Platonic dialogue accomplishes its transformative goal. An answer is developed as follows. First, the style of reading associated with analytical philosophy is not transformative, on account of its hermeneutical attachment and epistemic equality in the relationship between reader and author. Secondly, the style of reading associated with (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Grief, Death, and Longing in Stoic and Christian Ethics.Paul Scherz - 2017 - Journal of Religious Ethics 45 (1):7-28.
    The Stoic rejection of the passion of grief strikes many ethicists writing on dying as inhuman, selfish, or lacking appreciation for the world. This essay argues that Stoics rejected grief and the fear of death because these passions alienated one from the present through sorrow or anxiety for the future, disrupting one's ability to fulfill obligations of care for others and to feel gratitude for the gift of loved ones. Early Christian writers on death, such as Ambrose, maintained much of (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Imitation in Faith: Enacting Paul’s Ambiguous Pistis Christou Formulations on a Greco-Roman Stage.Suzan J. M. Sierksma-Agteres - 2016 - International Journal of Philosophy and Theology 77 (3):119-153.
    ABSTRACTThere is an ongoing debate in New Testament scholarship on the correct interpretation of Paul’s pistis Christou formulations: are we justified by our own faith/trust in Christ, or by participating in Christ’s faith and faithfulness towards God? This article contributes to the position of purposeful or sustained ambiguity by reading Paul’s imitation – and faith – language against the background of Hellenistic-Roman thought on and practice of imitation. In particular, the mimetic chain between teachers and students training for a philosophical (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • The Ethics of Reading Wittgenstein.Michael A. Peters - 2018 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 51 (6):546-558.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Sobre o “Ídolo da Mente”: Edmund Husserl E Paul Valéry.Mindaugas Briedis - 2016 - Filosofia Unisinos 17 (1):13-18.
    Este artigo analisa algumas partes estruturais menos exploradas do método fenomenológico tal como compreendido por Husserl, a fim de validar uma tese bipartida. Primeiro, a aplicação de noções fenomenológicas, como ‘modificação de neutralidade’, a distinção entre ego posicional, transcendental e ego imaginativo, a consciência corporal, etc., estimula a desconstrução de uma busca “espiritual” em qualquer sentido tradicional e/ou moderno. Por outro lado, esta abordagem oferece algumas novas possibilidades para a busca de “absolvição transcendental” que é ilustrada aqui pela abordagem criativa (...)
    Download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Henry David Thoreau's Anti‐Work Spirituality and a New Theological Ethic of Work.Jonathan Malesic - 2017 - Journal of Religious Ethics 45 (2):309-329.
    Although Henry David Thoreau stands outside the Christian canon, his outlook on the relations among spirituality, ecology, and economy highlights how Christian theologians can develop a theological work ethic in our era of economic and ecological precarity. He can furthermore help theologians counter the pro-work bias in much Christian thought. In Walden, Thoreau shows that the best work is an ascetic practice that reveals and reaps the abundance of nature and connects the person to the immanent divine and thereby glimpsing (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • Qigong, Philosophical Reading, and the Cultivation of Attention: Chinese Contemplative Body Practices and Slow Philosophy.Steven Geisz - 2020 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy:1-15.
    Qigong practices are contemplative body practices and meditation techniques that emerge from Chinese philosophical, medical, and martial traditions. This paper argues that qigong is a kind of embod...
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • A Daoist Way of Being: Clarity and Stillness as Embodied Practice.Louis Komjathy - 2019 - Asian Philosophy 29 (1):50-64.
    ABSTRACTDaoism, especially classical Daoism, is often constructed as a ‘philosophy,’ ‘set of ideas,’ or ‘system of thought.’ This is particularly the case in studies of Chinese philosophy and comparative philosophy. The present article draws attention to the central importance of clarity and stillness as a Daoist form of meditative practice, contemplative experience, and way of being. Examining historical precedents in classical Daoism, the article gives particular attention to the Tang dynasty ‘Clarity-and-Stillness Literature,’ specifically the eighth-century Qingjing jing 清靜經. In the (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Anger and the Virtues: A Critical Study in Virtue Individuation.Ryan West - 2016 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 46 (6):877-897.
    Aristotle and others suggest that a single virtue – ‘good temper’ – pertains specifically to anger. I argue that if good temper is a single virtue, it is constituted by aspects of a combination of other virtues. I present three categories of anger-relevant virtues – those that dispose one to anger; those that delay, mitigate, and qualify anger; and those required for effortful anger control – and show how virtues in each category make distinct contributions to good temper. In addition (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • Calling Science Pseudoscience: Fleck's Archaeologies of Fact and Latour's ‘Biography of an Investigation’ in AIDS Denialism and Homeopathy.Babette Babich - 2015 - International Studies in the Philosophy of Science 29 (1):1-39.
    Fleck's Genesis and Development of a Scientific Fact foregrounds claims traditionally excluded from reception, often regarded as opposed to fact, scientific claims that are increasingly seldom discussed in connection with philosophy of science save as examples of pseudoscience. I am especially concerned with scientists who question the epidemiological link between HIV and AIDS and who are thereby discounted—no matter their credentials, no matter the cogency of their arguments, no matter the sobriety of their statistics—but also with other classic examples of (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • Schopenhauer, Nietzsche, Death and Salvation.Julian Young - 2008 - European Journal of Philosophy 16 (2):311-324.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  • The Rhetoric Of Context.Jung H. Lee - 2013 - Journal of Religious Ethics 41 (4):555-584.
    This paper presents a critical appraisal of the recent turn in comparative religious ethics to virtue theory; it argues that the specific aspirations of virtue ethicists to make ethics more contextual, interdisciplinary, and practice-centered has in large measure failed to match the rhetoric. I suggest that the focus on the category of the human and practices associated with self-formation along with a methodology grounded in “analogical imagination” has actually poeticized the subject matter into highly abstract textual studies on normative voices (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   8 citations  
  • The Problem of Relevance and the Future of Philosophy of Religion.Thomas D. Carroll - 2016 - Metaphilosophy 47 (1):39-58.
    Despite the growth in research in philosophy of religion over the past several decades, recent years have seen a number of critical studies of this subfield in an effort to redirect the methods and topics of inquiry. This article argues that in addition to problems of religious parochialism described by critics such as Wesley Wildman, the subfield is facing a problem of relevance. In responding to this problem, it suggests that philosophers of religion should do three things: first, be critically (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  • “Now, How You Sound”: Considering a Different Philosophical Praxis.Devonya N. Havis - 2014 - Hypatia 29 (1):237-252.
    This paper is a tentative attempt to set out some of the basic points for articulating an alternative philosophical praxis derived from some Black women's lives and experiences. It begins with an explanation of delegitimating processes and the importance of not dividing theory from practice. The essay offers six practices that outline the unique critical attitude that constitutes philosophical practices rooted in Black women's lived experience and asks “How we sound” when doing academic philosophy.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  • God and the Soul: Augustine on the Journey to True Selfhood.Terence Sweeney - 2016 - Heythrop Journal 57 (4):678-691.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Learning To Look.Nancy E. Snow - 2013 - Teaching Ethics 13 (2):1-22.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • What Is ‘The Meaning of Our Cheerfulness’? Philosophy as a Way of Life in Nietzsche and Montaigne.R. Lanier Anderson & Rachel Cristy - 2017 - European Journal of Philosophy 25 (4):1514-1549.
    Robert Pippin has recently raised what he calls ‘the Montaigne problem’ for Nietzsche's philosophy: although Nietzsche advocates a ‘cheerful’ mode of philosophizing for which Montaigne is an exemplar, he signally fails to write with the obvious cheerfulness attained by Montaigne. We explore the moral psychological structure of the cheerfulness Nietzsche values, revealing unexpected complexity in his conception of the attitude. For him, the right kind of cheerfulness is radically non-naïve; it expresses the overcoming of justified revulsion at calamitous aspects of (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Richard Peters and Valuing Authenticity.M. A. B. Degenhardt - 2009 - Philosophy of Education 43 (Supplement s1):209-222.
    Richard Peters has been praised for the authenticity of his philosophy, and inquiry into aspects of the development of his philosophy reveals a profound authenticity. Yet authenticity is something he seems not to favour. The apparent paradox is resolved by observing historical changes in the understanding of authenticity as an important value. Possibilities are noted for further explorations as to how to understand and value it as an educational ideal.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Philosophy for Children and its Critics: A Mendham Dialogue.Maughn Gregory - 2011 - Philosophy of Education 45 (2):199-219.
    As conceived by founders Matthew Lipman and Ann Margaret Sharp, Philosophy for Children is a humanistic practice with roots in the Hellenistic tradition of philosophy as a way of life given to the search for meaning, in American pragmatism with its emphasis on qualitative experience, collaborative inquiry and democratic society, and in American and Soviet social learning theory. The programme has attracted overlapping and conflicting criticism from religious and social conservatives who don't want children to question traditional values, from educational (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   13 citations  
  • The Frustrations of Virtue: The Myth of Moral Neutrality in Psychotherapy.Richard Hamilton - 2013 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 19 (3):485-492.
    This article questions a number of widely held views of the role of values in psychotherapy. It begins with a discussion of the now largely discredited view that psychotherapy can be value free. It also broadens this challenge to question the popular idea that values form an inescapable part of the therapeutic encounter. While this view is correct in outline, it is necessary to reject the underlying conception of values as largely arbitrary preferences that the client and the therapist bring (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • Technologies of Self-Cultivation How to Improve Stoic Self-Care Apps.Matthew Dennis - 2020 - Human Affairs 30 (4):549-558.
    Self-care apps are booming. Early iterations of this technology focused on tracking health and fitness routines, but recently some developers have turned their attention to the cultivation of character, basing their conceptual resources on the Hellenistic tradition. Those familiar with the final writings of Michel Foucault will notice an intriguing coincidence between the development of these products and his claims that the Hellenistic tradition of self-cultivation has much to offer contemporary life. In this article, I explore Foucault’s cryptic remarks on (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • Wittgenstein and the Xunzi on the Clarification of Language.Thomas D. Carroll - 2018 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 17 (4):527-545.
    Broadly speaking, language is part of a social activity in both Wittgenstein and Xunzi 荀子, and for both clarification of language is central to their philosophical projects; the goal of this article is to explore the extent of resonance and discord that may be found when comparing these two philosophers. While for Xunzi, the rectification of names is anchored in a regard for establishing, propagating, and/or restoring a harmonious social system, perspicuity is for Wittgenstein represented as a philosophical end in (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Mathematics and the Definitions of Religion.Kevin Schilbrack - 2018 - International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 83 (2):145-160.
    In 2014, I published a proposal for a definition of “religion”. My goal was to offer a definition of this contentious term that would include Buddhism, Daoism, and other non-theistic forms of life widely considered religions in the contemporary world. That proposal suggested necessary and sufficient conditions for treating a form of life as a religious one. It was critiqued as too broad, however, on the grounds that it would include the study of math as a religion. How can one (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • Alone with Oneself: Solitude as Cultural Technique.Sascha Rashof & Thomas Macho - 2021 - Angelaki 26 (1):9-21.
    The essay examines solitude not as fate, sacrifice or passion, but as an experience that is actively initiated, that is perceived ambivalently, sometimes painfully, but also sensually, and that functions as context as well as occasion for the practice of cultural techniques – talking, reading, writing, drawing or painting. Solitude techniques are analysed as “technologies of the self” and “techniques of the body”, as strategies for self-perception and “internal policy”. The history of these self-techniques as solitude techniques is unfolded using (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • The Curious Incident of Wisdom in the Thought of Feng Qi : Comparative Philosophy, Historical Materialism, and Metaphysics.Ady Van den Stock - 2018 - Asian Philosophy 28 (3):241-258.
    ABSTRACTAfter some introductory remarks on the work of the modern Chinese philosopher Feng Qi, I begin this article by providing some observations concerning the ambiguous notion of ‘wisdom’ in Orientalist representations of non-Western thought and in comparative philosophy, as well as on the peculiar form of subjectivity ascribed to the ‘wise’ subject. I then proceed by offering an account of Feng’s philosophical universalism and historical materialist outlook, outlining the identification of wisdom with metaphysics in his early work and exploring the (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Philosophy as Transformative Practice: A Proposal for a New Concept of Philosophy That Better Suits Philosophy Education.Phillipp Thomas - 2019 - Argument: Biannual Philosophical Journal 9 (2):185-199.
    The source of the following considerations is the observation that academic philosophy at universities does not fit well with philosophy education processes, e.g., those at school. Both sides seem to be separate from each other. I assume that the two areas rely on two very different concepts of philosophy. To work out a concept of philosophy more appropriate to the educational context, I methodically apply the practical turn to our philosophising in very different contexts. Moreover, I elaborate that it is (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Philosophy, Theology and Patristic Thought.Michael Craig Rhodes - 2016 - International Journal of Philosophy and Theology 77 (4-5):219-236.
    ABSTRACTThe common way of speaking of patristic thought is as theology. Disuse of the appellation ‘patristic philosophy’ is the result of separationist taxonomies in both philosophy and theology. Returning to the meanings of the terms theologia and philosophia in ancient and late ancient thought, this paper argues, with an eye toward Orthodox thought, for the reasonableness of speaking of patristic thought as philosophy.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Subjectivity as the Care of the Self: A Foucaultian Reading of Self-Care.Radu Bandol - 2015 - Postmodern Openings 6 (1):65-85.
    This study is considered as a proposal to identify some metaphysical support of the self-care for a patient suffering from a chronic disease, as an extension of the bio-psycho-social paradigm. The methodology is dominated by a phenomenological perspective, supported by a hermeneutic conceptual analysis of the care of the self in Michel Foucault, focused on the Socratico-Platonic period and pervaded by the intention of having a translation and application to self-care. Foucault pleads for an aesthetics of the self, called subjectivity, (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Educating for Moral Ability: Reflections on Moral Development Based on Vygotsky's Theory of Concept Formation.Paul Duncan Crawford - 2001 - Journal of Moral Education 30 (2):113-129.
    The idea examined here is that the development of moral ability shares important similarities with the development of conceptual thinking as outlined in the work of Lev Vygotsky. Most notably, the mature forms of both processes are ways of constructing meaning that are not governed by pre-established modes of behaviour. The principal suggestion here is that Vygotsky's theory of concept formation can be used as a generative model for understanding the development of moral ability in a way that challenges the (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  • Agnes Heller's Ecce Homo: A Neomodern Vision of Moral Anthropology.Marios Constantinou - 1999 - Thesis Eleven 59 (1):29-52.
    By dovetailing the classical concepts of virtue, beauty, harmony and happiness with the cardinal values of modern imagination, life and freedom, Agnes Heller galvanizes modernity's anthropological reflexivity and hints at the prospect of a classicism pertinent to the present. Beyond nostalgia for an ancient past or apology for a contemporary present, her moral anthropology is approached via a dialectical elucidation of aspects of epicurean theory attuned to modernity's complexity. Under the contemporary condition of waning postmodern challenges, escalating confusion and cynicism, (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation