Switch to: References

Add citations

You must login to add citations.
  1. Transparency of Mind: The Contributions of Descartes, Leibniz, and Berkeley to the Genesis of the Modern Subject.Gary Hatfield - 2011 - In Hubertus Busche (ed.), Departure for Modern Europe: A Handbook of Early Modern Philosophy (1400-1700). Felix Meiner Verlag. pp. 361–375.
    The chapter focuses on attributions of the transparency of thought to early modern figures, most notably Descartes. Many recent philosophers assume that Descartes believed the mind to be “transparent”: since all mental states are conscious, we are therefore aware of them all, and indeed incorrigibly know them all. Descartes, and Berkeley too, do make statements that seem to endorse both aspects of the transparency theses (awareness of all mental states; incorrigibility). However, they also make systematic theoretical statements that directly countenance (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • The Light of the Soul: Theories of Ideas in Leibniz, Malebranche, and Descartes.Nicholas Jolley - 1990 - Oxford University Press.
    The concept of an "idea" played a central role in 17th-century theories of mind and knowledge, but philosophers were divided over the nature of ideas. This book examines an important, but little-known, debate on this question in the work of Leibniz, Malebranche, and Descartes. Looking closely at the issues involved, as well as the particular context in which the debate took place, Jolley demonstrates that the debate has serious implications for a number of major topics in 17th-century philosophy.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   14 citations  
  • A função do olho humano na óptica do final do século XVI.Claudemir Roque Tossato - 2005 - Scientiae Studia 3 (3):415-441.
    Download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • J.J. Gibson and the Ecological Approach to Perception.Aaron Ben-Zeev - 1981 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 12 (2):107-139.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  • Kant's Intuitionism a Commentary on the Transcendental Aesthetic.Lorne Falkenstein - 1995 - University of Toronto Press.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   14 citations  
  • Expectation, Modelling and Assent in the History of Optics—II. Kepler and Descartes.A. C. Cr̀ombie - 1991 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 22 (1):89-115.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • “The Body I Call ‘Mine’ ”: A Sense of Bodily Ownership in Descartes.Colin Chamberlain - 2019 - European Journal of Philosophy 27 (1):3-24.
    How does Descartes characterize the peculiar way in which each of us is aware of our bodies? I argue that Descartes recognizes a sense of bodily ownership, such that the body sensorily appears to be one's own in bodily awareness. This sensory appearance of ownership is ubiquitous, for Descartes, in that bodily awareness always confers a sense of ownership. This appearance is confused, in so far as bodily awareness simultaneously represents the subject as identical to, partially composed by, and united (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Kant's Transcendental Psychology.Patricia Kitcher - 1994 - Oup Usa.
    In this innovative study Patricia Kitcher argues that we can only understand the deduction of the categories in Kant's Critique of Pure Reason in terms of his attempt to fathom the psychological prerequisites of thought. Thus a consideration of his conception of psychology is essential to an understanding of his philosophy. Kitcher specifically considers Kant's claims about the unity of the thinking self; the spatial forms of human perceptions; the relations among mental states necessary for them to have content; the (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   31 citations  
  • Descartes, Malebranche, and the Crisis of Perception.Walter Ott - 2017 - Oxford: Oxford University Press.
    The seventeenth century witnesses the demise of two core doctrines in the theory of perception: naive realism about color, sound, and other sensible qualities and the empirical theory, drawn from Alhacen and Roger Bacon, which underwrote it. This created a problem for seventeenth century philosophers: how is that we use qualities such as color, feel, and sound to locate objects in the world, even though these qualities are not real? -/- Ejecting such sensible qualities from the mind-independent world at once (...)
    Download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Towards a Postmodern Conception of Metaphysics: On the Genealogy and Successor Disciplines of Modern Philosophy.Herman Philipse - 1994 - Metaphilosophy 25 (1):1-44.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  • Natural Geometry in Descartes and Kepler.Gary Hatfield - 2015 - Res Philosophica 92 (1):117-148.
    According to Kepler and Descartes, the geometry of the triangle formed by the two eyes when focused on a single point affords perception of the distance to that point. Kepler characterized the processes involved as associative learning. Descartes described the processes as a “ natural geometry.” Many interpreters have Descartes holding that perceivers calculate the distance to the focal point using angle-side-angle, calculations that are reduced to unnoticed mental habits in adult vision. This article offers a purely psychophysiological interpretation of (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Mind–Body Causation, Mind–Body Union and the ‘Special Mode of Thinking’ in Descartes.Tom Vinci - 2008 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 16 (3):461 – 488.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • The Biology of Science: An Essay on the Evolution of Representational Cognitivism.Arthur Still - 1986 - Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 16 (3):251–267.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • The Passions of the Soul and Descartes’s Machine Psychology.Gary Hatfield - 2007 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 38 (1):1-35.
    Descartes developed an elaborate theory of animal physiology that he used to explain functionally organized, situationally adapted behavior in both human and nonhuman animals. Although he restricted true mentality to the human soul, I argue that he developed a purely mechanistic (or material) ‘psychology’ of sensory, motor, and low-level cognitive functions. In effect, he sought to mechanize the offices of the Aristotelian sensitive soul. He described the basic mechanisms in the Treatise on man, which he summarized in the Discourse. However, (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   17 citations  
  • Space and Sight.A. D. Smith - 2000 - Mind 109 (435):481-518.
    This paper, which has both a historical and a polemical aspect, investigates the view, dominant throughout the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, that the sense of sight is, originally, not phenomenally three-dimensional in character, and that we must come to interpret its properly two-dimensional data by reference to the sense of 'touch'. The principal argument for this claim, due to Berkeley, is examined and found wanting. The supposedly confirming findings concerning 'Molyneux subjects' are also investigated and are shown to be either (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   12 citations  
  • Discovering the Forms of Intuition.Patricia Kitcher - 1987 - Philosophical Review 96 (2):205-248.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   30 citations  
  • Descartes on Life and Sense.Ann Wilbur Mackenzie - 1989 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 19 (2):163 - 192.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • The Moon Illusion.Frances Egan - 1998 - Philosophy of Science 65 (4):604-23.
    Ever since Berkeley discussed the problem at length in his Essay Toward a New Theory of Vision, theorists of vision have attempted to explain why the moon appears larger on the horizon than it does at the zenith. Prevailing opinion has it that the contemporary perceptual psychologists Kaufman and Rock have finally explained the illusion. This paper argues that Kaufman and Rock have not refuted a Berkeleyan account of the illusion, and have over-interpreted their own experimental results. The moon illusion (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • L’Homme in Psychology and Neuroscience.Gary Hatfield - 2016 - In Stephen Gaukroger & Delphine Antoine-Mahut (eds.), Descartes' Treatise on Man and Its Reception. New York: Springer. pp. 269–285.
    L’Homme presents what has been termed Descartes’ “physiological psychology”. It envisions and seeks to explain how the brain and nerves might yield situationally appropriate behavior through mechanical means. On occasion in the past 150 years, this aim has been recognized, described, and praised. Still, acknowledgement of this aspect of Descartes’ writing has been spotty in histories of neuroscience and histories of psychology. In recent years, there has been something of a resurgence. This chapter argues that, in seeking to explain psychological (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Material Translations in the Cartesian Brain.Nima Bassiri - 2012 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C 43 (1):244-255.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Material Translations in the Cartesian Brain.Nima Bassiri - 2012 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 43 (1):244-255.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • On Natural Geometry and Seeing Distance Directly in Descartes.Gary Hatfield - 2015 - In Vincenzo De Risi (ed.), Mathematizing Space: The Objects of Geometry from Antiquity to the Early Modern Age. Berlin: Birkhäuser. pp. 157-91.
    As the word “optics” was understood from antiquity into and beyond the early modern period, it did not mean simply the physics and geometry of light, but meant the “theory of vision” and included what we should now call physiological and psychological aspects. From antiquity, these aspects were subject to geometrical analysis. Accordingly, the geometry of visual experience has long been an object of investigation. This chapter examines accounts of size and distance perception in antiquity (Euclid and Ptolemy) and the (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • The Passivity Assumption of the Sensation—Perception Distinction.Aaron Ben-Zeev - 1984 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 35 (December):327-343.
    The sensation-perception distinction did not appear before the seventeenth century, but since then various formulations of it have gained wide acceptance. This is not an historical accident and the article suggests an explanation for its appearance. Section 1 describes a basic assumption underlying the sensation-perception distinction, to wit, the postulation of a pure sensory stage--viz. sensation--devoid of active influence of the agent's cognitive, emotional, and evaluative frameworks. These frameworks are passive in that stage. I call this postulation the passivity assumption. (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  • The Absolute Network Theory of Language and Traditional Epistemology: On the Philosophical Foundations of Paul Churchland's Scientific Realism.Herman Philipse - 1990 - Inquiry: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy 33 (2):127 – 178.
    Paul Churchland's philosophical work enjoys an increasing popularity. His imaginative papers on cognitive science and the philosophy of psychology are widely discussed. Scientific Realism and the Plasticity of Mind (1979), his major book, is an important contribution to the debate on realism. Churchland provides us with the intellectual tools for constructing a unified scientific Weltanschauung. His network theory of language implies a provocative view of the relation between science and common sense. This paper contains a critical examination of Churchland's network (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  • Metaphysical Realism as a Pre-Condition of Visual Perception.Stephen J. Boulter - 2004 - Biology and Philosophy 19 (2):243-261.
    In this paper I present a transcendental argument based on the findings of cognitive psychology and neurophysiology which invites two conclusions: First and foremost, that a pre-condition of visual perception itself is precisely what the Aristotelian and other commonsense realists maintain, namely, the independent existence of a featured, or pre-packaged world; second, this finding, combined with other reflections, suggests that, contra McDowell and other neo-Kantians, human beings have access to things as they are in the world via non-projective perception. These (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  • Descartes' Physiology and its Relation to His Psychology.Gary Hatfield - 1992 - In John Cottingham (ed.), The Cambridge Companion to Descartes. Cambridge University Press. pp. 335--370.
    Descartes understood the subject matter of physics (or natural philosophy) to encompass the whole of nature, including living things. It therefore comprised not only nonvital phenomena, including those we would now denominate as physical, chemical, minerological, magnetic, and atmospheric; it also extended to the world of plants and animals, including the human animal (with the exception of those aspects of the human mind that Descartes assigned to solely to thinking substance: pure intellect and will). Descartes wrote extensively on physiology and (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   40 citations  
  • Locke and the Visual Array.Michael Jacovides - 2012 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 85 (1):69-91.
    A.D. Smith opens his excellent paper, “Space and Sight,” by remarking, One of the most notable features of both philosophy and psychology throughout the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries is the almost universal denial that we are immediately aware through sight of objects arrayed in three-dimensional space. This was not merely a denial of Direct Realism, but a denial that truly visual objects are even phenomenally presented in depth (481). Times have changed. As Smith writes, “It is hard to think of (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Esoteric Theology: William of Auvergne on the Fires of Hell and Purgatory.Alan Bernstein - 1982 - Speculum 57 (2):509-531.
    Esoteric knowledge, reserved for a few specially trained thinkers, as opposed to an exoteric faith disseminated to the masses, is not usually associated with scholastic theology. It is therefore interesting to find that William of Auvergne, longtime theologian at the University of Paris and bishop of that city from 1228 until his death in 1249, applied the concept to his account of the fires of hell and purgatory. Because he considered the infernal and purgatorial fires as deterrents to antisocial acts, (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Die Wissenschaftstheorie Galileis — Oder: Contra FeyerabendGalileo's Philosophy of Science — Or: Contra Feyerabend.Klaus Fischer - 1992 - Journal for General Philosophy of Science / Zeitschrift für Allgemeine Wissenschaftstheorie 23 (1):165-197.
    Galileo's Philosophy of Science - or: Contra Feyerabend. In analyzing Galileo's methodology, philosophers of science were using, misusing, and abusing his ideas rather unashamedly to suit their own purposes. Like so many others before him, Paul Feyerabend had come to the conclusion that his methodological ideas might gain momentum by demonstrating their compatibility with those of Galileo. The reinterpretation of Galileo as a true, though disguised, anarchist, was considered by Feyerabend as the most forceful, and indeed conclusive, case against rationalism (...)
    Download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Constancy, Content, and Inference.David Hilbert - 2012 - In Gary Hatfield & Sarah Allred (eds.), Visual Experience: Sensation, Cognition, and Constancy. Oxford University Press. pp. 199.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Objective and Subjective Sides of Perception.Alan Gilchrist - 2012 - In Gary Hatfield & Sarah Allred (eds.), Visual Experience: Sensation, Cognition, and Constancy. Oxford University Press. pp. 105.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • Perception and the Language of Nature.Rebecca Copenhaver - 2013 - In James A. Harris (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of British Philosophy in the Eighteenth Century. Oxford University Press. pp. 107.
    This chapter discusses eighteenth-century British theories of perception, beginning with George Berkeley’s Essay Towards a New Theory of Vision. The chapter traces Berkeley’s influence through Thomas Reid, David Hume, David Hartley, Adam Smith and Dugald Stewart. The chapter presents theories of perception in this time a place a primarily concerned with metaphysics, mind and methodology rather than epistemology.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • Getting the Big Picture in Perspectivist Optics.A. Mark Smith - 1981 - Isis 72 (4):568-589.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • Perceptual Illusions: Philosophical and Psychological Essays.Clotilde Calabi (ed.) - 2012
    Download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • G. F. Parrot and the Theory of Unconscious Inferences.Jüri Allik & Kenn Konstabel - 2005 - Journal of the History of the Behavioral Sciences 41 (4):317-330.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark