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  1. Effect of Ethical Climate on Turnover Intention: Linking Attitudinal- and Stress Theory.Jay P. Mulki, Jorge F. Jaramillo & William B. Locander - 2008 - Journal of Business Ethics 78 (4):559-574.
    Attitudinal- and stress theory are used to investigate the effect of ethical climate on job outcomes. Responses from 208 service employees who work for a country health department were used to test a structural model that examines the process through which ethical climate (EC) affects turnover intention (TI). This study shows that the EC-TI relationship is fully mediated by role stress (RC), interpersonal conflict (IC), emotional exhaustion (EE), trust in supervisor (TS), and job satisfaction (JS). Results show that EC reduces (...)
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  • Trickle Effects of Cross-Sector Social Partnerships.Ans Kolk, Willemijn van Dolen & Marlene Vock - 2010 - Journal of Business Ethics 94 (S1):123 - 137.
    Cross-sector social partnerships are often studied from a macro and meso perspective, also in an attempt to assess effectiveness and societal impact. This article pays specific attention to the micro perspective, i.e. individual interactions between and within organizations related to partnerships that address the 'social good'. By focusing on the potential effects and mechanisms at the level of individuals and the organization(s) with which they interact, it aims to help fill a gap in research on partnerships, including more insight into (...)
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  • Epistemology, Moral Philosophy and Optimism: A Comparative Analysis Between Managers and Their Subordinates.Mohammed Y. A. Rawwas, Hadi Abdul-Rahman Hammoud & Karthik N. S. Iyer - 2019 - Business and Society Review 124 (1):5-42.
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  • Strengthening Customer Value Development and Ethical Intent in the Salesforce: The Influence of Ethical Values Person–Organization Fit and Trust in Manager.Charles H. Schwepker - 2019 - Journal of Business Ethics 159 (3):913-925.
    This research seeks to better understand how an organization-related employee perception and job attitude may influence organizational members to ethically create customer value. Specifically, it is proposed that high person–organization fit perception, more precisely ethical values person–organization fit perception, can influence business-to-business salesperson commitment to providing superior customer value both directly and indirectly through trust in sales manager, while encouraging ethical salesforce behavior, an important aspect of communicating and delivering customer value. Results from a study of 408 business-to-business salespeople find (...)
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  • The Impact of Ethical Climate Types on Nurses’ Behaviors in Bosnia and Herzegovina.M. Sait Dinc & Alma Huric - 2017 - Nursing Ethics 24 (8):922-935.
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  • Modeling Job Pursuit Intention: Moderating Mechanisms of Socio-Environmental Consciousness. [REVIEW]Yuan-Hui Tsai, Sheng-Wuu Joe, Chieh-Peng Lin & Rong-Tsu Wang - 2014 - Journal of Business Ethics 125 (2):1-12.
    Many scholars have suggested the relationship between corporate social performance and its ability to attract a large number of high-quality job applicants, because previous literature indicates that employees with strong social awareness help create a high-performance organization. For that reason, an important issue for successful business recruitment is how to boost the pursuit intention of job seekers. This study discusses such issue by proposing a model based on signaling theory and cognitive dissonance theory. In the proposed model of this study, (...)
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  • Environmental Influences on Ethical Decision Making: Climate and Environmental Predictors of Research Integrity.Michael D. Mumford, Stephen T. Murphy, Shane Connelly, Jason H. Hill, Alison L. Antes, Ryan P. Brown & Lynn D. Devenport - 2007 - Ethics and Behavior 17 (4):337 – 366.
    It is commonly held that early career experiences influence ethical behavior. One way early career experiences might operate is to influence the decisions people make when presented with problems that raise ethical concerns. To test this proposition, 102 first-year doctoral students were asked to complete a series of measures examining ethical decision making along with a series of measures examining environmental experiences and climate perceptions. Factoring of the environmental measure yielded five dimensions: professional leadership, poor coping, lack of rewards, limited (...)
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  • Achieving Top Performance While Building Collegiality in Sales: It All Starts with Ethics.Omar S. Itani, Fernando Jaramillo & Larry Chonko - 2019 - Journal of Business Ethics 156 (2):417-438.
    While previous literature provides evidence of the positive relationship between ethical climate and job satisfaction, the possible mechanisms of this relationship are still underexplored. This study aims to enhance scholars’ and practitioners’ understanding of the ethical climate–job satisfaction relationship by identifying and testing two of the possible mechanisms. More specifically, this study fills an existing research gap by examining social and interpersonal mechanisms, referred to in this study as workplace isolation of colleagues and salesperson’s teamwork, of the ethical climate–job satisfaction (...)
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  • Organizational Virtue and Performance: An Empirical Study of Customers and Employees.Rosa Chun - 2017 - Journal of Business Ethics 146 (4):869-881.
    This paper offers the first large-scale empirical study of organizational virtue as perceived by both internal and external stakeholders and of the links between these virtues and organizational outcomes such as identification, satisfaction, and distinctiveness. It takes a strategic approach to virtue ethics, one that differs from a more traditional Aristotelian concept of virtue and from Alasdair MacIntyre’s manner of distinguishing between internal and external goods. The literature review compares three different perspectives on the empirical study of organizational virtues, taken (...)
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  • Moral Agents in Organisations? The Significance of Ethical Organisation Culture for Middle Managers’ Exercise of Moral Agency in Ethical Problems.Minna-Maaria Hiekkataipale & Anna-Maija Lämsä - 2019 - Journal of Business Ethics 155 (1):147-161.
    This paper investigates qualitatively the significance of different dimensions of ethical organisation culture for the exercise of middle managers’ moral agency in ethical problems. The research draws on the social cognitive theory of morality and on the corporate ethical virtues model. This study broadens understanding of the factors which enable or constrain managers’ potential for moral agency in organisations, and shows that an insufficient ethical organisational culture may contribute to indifference towards ethical issues, the experiencing of moral conflicts, lack of (...)
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  • Ethical Organisational Culture as a Context for Managers' Personal Work Goals.Mari Huhtala, Taru Feldt, Katriina Hyvönen & Saija Mauno - 2013 - Journal of Business Ethics 114 (2):265-282.
    The aims of this study were to investigate what kinds of personal work goals managers have and whether ethical organisational culture is related to these goals. The sample consisted of 811 Finnish managers from different organisations, in middle and upper management levels, aged 25–68 years. Eight work-related goal content categories were found based on the managers self-reported goals: (1) organisational goals (35.4 %), (2) competence goals (26.1 %), (3) well-being goals (12.1 %), (4) career-ending goals (7.3 %), (5) progression goals (...)
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  • Indigenous Insights Into Ethical Leadership: A Study of Māori Leaders.Jarrod Haar, Maree Roche & David Brougham - forthcoming - Journal of Business Ethics:1-20.
    The need for ethical leadership in navigating today’s complex, global and competitive organisations has been established. While research has confirmed the importance of ethical leaders in promoting positive organisational and employee outcomes, scant research has examined the antecedents of ethical leadership. Furthermore, there has been a call for further examination of leadership models, particularly indigenous leadership models. Responding to these issues, this study suggests Māori leaders’ values add insights into enhancing ethical leadership. Three studies confirm the role of Māori values (...)
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  • Influence of Ethical Ideology on Job Stress.Abhishek Shukla & Rajeev Srivastava - 2017 - Asian Journal of Business Ethics 6 (2):233-254.
    The relationship between ethical ideology and job stress appears to be complex. This study is based on a model presented by Forsyth, showing two dimensions that play an important role in ethical evaluation and behavior. Based on a survey of 561 employees of hotel industry in India, ethical ideologies were found to be negatively associated with job stress. The data were analyzed using Pearson correlations and multiple regressions. The result showed that relativism is negatively correlated with job stress. Further, it (...)
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  • Improving the “Leader–Follower” Relationship: Top Manager or Supervisor? The Ethical Leadership Trickle-Down Effect on Follower Job Response.Pablo Ruiz, Carmen Ruiz & Ricardo Martínez - 2011 - Journal of Business Ethics 99 (4):587-608.
    Since time immemorial, the phenomenon of leadership and its understanding has attracted the attention of the business world because of its important role in human groups. Nevertheless, for years efforts to understand this concept have only been centred on people in leadership roles, thus overlooking an important aspect in its understanding: the necessary moral dimension which is implicit in the relationship between leader and follower. As an illustrative example of the importance of considering good morality in leadership, an empirical study (...)
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  • Consequences of Concern: Ethics, Social Responsibility, and Well-Being.Mark D. Promislo, Robert A. Giacalone & Jeremy Welch - 2012 - Business Ethics 21 (2):209-219.
    Prior research has studied the antecedents of beliefs regarding ethics and social responsibility (ESR). However, few studies have examined how individual well-being may be related to such beliefs. In this exploratory study, we assessed the relationship between perceived importance of ESR – both individually and of one's company – and indicators of physical and psychological well-being. Results demonstrated that perceived importance of ESR was associated with three aspects of well-being: exuberance for life, sleep problems, and job stress. The results are (...)
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  • Positive Job Response and Ethical Job Performance.Sean Valentine, Philip Varca, Lynn Godkin & Tim Barnett - 2010 - Journal of Business Ethics 91 (2):195-206.
    Although many studies have linked job attitudes and intentions to aspects of in-role and extra-role job performance, there has been relatively little attention given to such job responses in the context of employees’ ethical/unethical behavior. The purpose of this study was to investigate a possible relationship between positive job response (conceptualized as job satisfaction and intention to stay) and behavioral ethics. Ninety-two matched manager-employee pairs from a regional branch of a large financial services and banking firm completed survey instruments, with (...)
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  • Ethics Programs, Perceived Corporate Social Responsibility and Job Satisfaction.Sean Valentine & Gary Fleischman - 2008 - Journal of Business Ethics 77 (2):159 - 172.
    Companies offer ethics codes and training to increase employees’ ethical conduct. These programs can also enhance individual work attitudes because ethical organizations are typically valued. Socially responsible companies are likely viewed as ethical organizations and should therefore prompt similar employee job responses. Using survey information collected from 313 business professionals, this exploratory study proposed that perceived corporate social responsibility would mediate the positive relationships between ethics codes/training and job satisfaction. Results indicated that corporate social responsibility fully or partially mediated the (...)
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  • Toward a Better Understanding of the Link Between Ethical Climate and Job Satisfaction: A Multilevel Analysis. [REVIEW]Yau-De Wang & Hui-Hsien Hsieh - 2012 - Journal of Business Ethics 105 (4):535-545.
    Research concerning the relationship between psychological ethical climate and job satisfaction is popular in the literature. However, to date, no study in the literature has simultaneously investigated both the effects of individual-level and organization-level ethical climates on employees’ job satisfaction. On the basis of a multilevel analysis, the present study used a sample of 472 full-time employees from 31 organizations in Taiwan to examine the above two effects. Results from the analyses showed that within the organizations, individual employees’ instrumental climate (...)
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  • Ethical Culture, Ethical Intent, and Organizational Citizenship Behavior: The Moderating and Mediating Role of Person–Organization Fit.Pablo Ruiz-Palomino & Ricardo Martínez-Cañas - 2014 - Journal of Business Ethics 120 (1):95-108.
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  • Understanding Pay Satisfaction: Effects of Supervisor Ethical Leadership on Job Motivating Potential Influence.Pablo Ruiz-Palomino, Francisco J. Sáez-Martínez & Ricardo Martínez-Cañas - 2013 - Journal of Business Ethics 118 (1):31-43.
    Traditionally, research focused on determining the causes of employee pay satisfaction has investigated the influence of job-related inputs, both extrinsic and intrinsic to the job itself. Together with these inputs, pay-related fairness issues have played an important role in explaining the phenomenon. However, few studies consider the factors linked to fairness issues, such as ethical leadership. Because ethical leadership necessarily entails the concept of fairness, it seemingly should have a positive effect. Furthermore, because the presence of supervisor ethical leadership (SEL) (...)
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  • The Impact of Perceived Organizational Ethical Climate on Work Satisfaction.Meral Elçi & Lütfihak Alpkan - 2009 - Journal of Business Ethics 84 (3):297-311.
    This empirical study investigates the effects of nine ethical climate types (self-interest, company profit, efficiency, friendship, team interest, social responsibility, personal morality, company rules and procedures, and lastly laws and professional codes) on employee work satisfaction. The ethical climate typology developed by Victor and Cullen (in W. C. Frederick (ed.) Research in Corporate Social Performance and Policy, 1987; Administrative Science Quarterly 33, 101–125, 1988) is tested on a sample of staff and managers from 62 different telecommunication firms in Turkey. The (...)
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  • Perceptions of the Ethical Climate in the Korean Tourism Industry.Nan Young Kim & Graham Miller - 2008 - Journal of Business Ethics 82 (4):941-954.
    This study investigates the ethical climate types presented in the Korean tourism industry, the differences in the perceptions of these ethical climate types based on individual/organizational characteristics, and the influence of ethical climate types based on job satisfaction/organizational commitment. Empirical findings of this study identify six ethical climate types and demonstrate significant difference and significant influence of the proposed relationships. This research contributes to the existing body of academic work by using empirical data collected from 820 respondents across 14 companies (...)
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  • Establishing Organizational Ethical Climates: How Do Managerial Practices Work?K. Praveen Parboteeah, Hsien Chun Chen, Ying-Tzu Lin, I.-Heng Chen, Amber Y.-P. Lee & Anyi Chung - 2010 - Journal of Business Ethics 97 (4):599-611.
    Over the past two decades, Victor and Cullen's (Adm Sci Q 33:101-125, 1988) typology of ethical climates has been employed by many academics in research on issues of ethical climates. However, little is known about how managerial practices such as communication and empowerment influence ethical climates, especially from a functional perspective. The current study used a survey of employees from Taiwan's top 100 patent-owning companies to examine how communication and empowerment affect organizational ethical climates. The results confirm the relationship between (...)
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  • The Relationship Among Ethical Climate Types, Facets of Job Satisfaction, and the Three Components of Organizational Commitment: A Study of Nurses in Taiwan.Ming-Tien Tsai & Chun-Chen Huang - 2008 - Journal of Business Ethics 80 (3):565-581.
    The high turnover of nurses has become a global problem. Several studies have proposed that nurses' perceptions of the ethical climate of their organization are related to higher job satisfaction and organizational commitment, and thus lead to lower turnover. However, there is limited empirical evidence supporting a relationship between different types of ethical climate within organizations and facets of job satisfaction. Furthermore, no published studies have investigated the impact of different types of ethical climate on the three components of organizational (...)
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  • Professional Ethical Standards, Corporate Social Responsibility, and the Perceived Role of Ethics and Social Responsibility.Sean Valentine & Gary Fleischman - 2008 - Journal of Business Ethics 82 (3):657-666.
    This study explored several proposed relationships among professional ethical standards, corporate social responsibility, and the perceived role of ethics and social responsibility. Data were collected from 313 business managers registered with a large professional research association with a mailed self-report questionnaire. Mediated regression analysis indicated that perceptions of corporate social responsibility partially mediated the positive relationship between perceived professional ethical standards and the believed importance of ethics and social responsibility. Perceptions of corporate social responsibility also fully mediated the negative relationship (...)
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  • You Support Diversity, But Are You Ethical? Examining the Interactive Effects of Diversity and Ethical Climate Perceptions on Turnover Intentions. [REVIEW]Robert Stewart, Sabrina D. Volpone, Derek R. Avery & Patrick McKay - 2011 - Journal of Business Ethics 100 (4):581 - 593.
    Efforts to identify antecedents of employee turnover are likely to offer value to organizations through money saved on recruitment and new-hire training. The authors utilized the stakeholder perspective to corporate social responsibility to examine the effects of a perceived climate for ethics on the relationship between diversity climate and voluntary turnover intentions. Specifically, they examined how ethics climate (employees' perceptions that their organization values and enforces ethically correct behavior) affected the diversity climate-turnover intentions relationship. Results indicated that ethics climate moderated (...)
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  • The Impact of Emotional Intelligence, Organizational Commitment, and Job Satisfaction on Ethical Behavior of Chinese Employees.Weihui Fu - 2014 - Journal of Business Ethics 122 (1):137-144.
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  • Microfoundations of Partnerships: Exploring the Role of Employees in Trickle Effects.Ans Kolk, Marlene Vock & Willemijn van Dolen - 2016 - Journal of Business Ethics 135 (1):19-34.
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  • Direct and Multiplicative Effects of Ethical Dispositions and Ethical Climates on Personal Justice Norms: A Virtue Ethics Perspective.Victor P. Lau & Yin Yee Wong - 2009 - Journal of Business Ethics 90 (2):279-294.
    From virtue ethics and interactionist perspectives, we hypothesized that personal justice norms (distributive and procedural justice norms) were shaped directly and multiplicatively by ethical dispositions (equity sensitivity and need for structure) and ethical climates (egoistic, benevolent, and principle climates). We collected multisource data from 123 companies in Hong Kong, with personal factors assessed by participants’ self-reports and contextual factors by aggregations of their peers. In general, LISREL analyses with latent product variables supported the direct and multiplicative relationships. Our findings could (...)
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  • You Support Diversity, But Are You Ethical? Examining the Interactive Effects of Diversity and Ethical Climate Perceptions on Turnover Intentions.Robert W. Stewart - 2011 - Journal of Business Ethics 99 (3):453-465.
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  • Corporate Ethical Values, Group Creativity, Job Satisfaction and Turnover Intention: The Impact of Work Context on Work Response. [REVIEW]Sean Valentine, Lynn Godkin, Gary M. Fleischman & Roland Kidwell - 2011 - Journal of Business Ethics 98 (3):353 - 372.
    A corporate culture strengthened by ethical values and other positive business practices likely yields more favorable employee work responses. Thus, the purpose of this study was to assess the degree to which perceived corporate ethical values work in concert with group creativity to influence both job satisfaction and turnover intention. Using a self-report questionnaire, information was collected from 781 healthcare and administrative employees working at a multi-campus education-based healthcare organization. Additional survey data was collected from a comparative convenience sample of (...)
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  • The Relationship Between Informal Controls, Ethical Work Climates, and Organizational Performance.Sebastian Goebel & Barbara E. Weißenberger - 2017 - Journal of Business Ethics 141 (3):505-528.
    Due to the frequent occurrence of ethical transgressions and unethical employee behaviors, there has lately been an increasing interest in the ethical foundations of contemporary organizations. However, large-scale comprehensive analyses of organizational ethics are still comparatively limited. Our study contributes to both management control and business ethics literature by empirically examining potential antecedents as well as resulting effects of ethical work climates on organizational-level outcomes. Based on a cross-sectional survey among 295 large- and medium-sized companies, we find that more informal (...)
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  • Measuring and Differentiating Perceptions of Supervisor and Top Leader Ethics.Janet L. Kottke & Kathie L. Pelletier - 2013 - Journal of Business Ethics 113 (3):415-428.
    We report the results of two studies that evaluated the perceptions of supervisor and top leader ethics. In our first study, we re-analyzed data from Pelletier and Bligh (J Bus Ethics 67:359–374, 2006) and found that the Perceptions of Ethical Leadership Scale from that study could be used to differentiate perceptions of supervisor and top leader ethics. In a second study with a different sample, we examined the relationships between (1) individual employees’ perceptions of top managers’ and immediate supervisors’ ethical (...)
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  • Corporate Ethical Values and Altruism: The Mediating Role of Career Satisfaction. [REVIEW]Sean Valentine, Lynn Godkin, Gary M. Fleischman, Roland E. Kidwell & Karen Page - 2011 - Journal of Business Ethics 101 (4):509-523.
    This study explores the ability of career satisfaction to mediate the relationship between corporate ethical values and altruism. Using a sample of individuals employed in a four-campus, regional health science center, it was determined that individual career satisfaction fully mediated the positive relationship between perceptions of corporate ethical values and self-reported altruism. The findings imply that companies dedicating attention to positive corporate ethical values can enhance employee attitudes and altruistic behaviors, especially when individuals experience a high degree of career satisfaction.
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  • Ethical Culture and Employee Outcomes: The Mediating Role of Person-Organization Fit. [REVIEW]Pablo Ruiz-Palomino, Ricardo Martínez-Cañas & Joan Fontrodona - 2013 - Journal of Business Ethics 116 (1):173-188.
    We build on limited research concerning the mediation processes associated with the relationship between ethical culture and employee outcomes. A multidimensional measure of ethical culture was examined for its relationship to overall Person-Organization (P–O) fit and employee response, using a sample of 436 employees from social economy and commercial banks in Spain. In line with previous research involving unidimensional measures, ethical culture was found to relate positively to employee job satisfaction, affective commitment, and intention to stay. New to the literature, (...)
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  • The Effects of Ethical Leadership and Ethical Climate on Employee Ethical Behavior in the International Port Context.Chin-Shan Lu & Chi-Chang Lin - 2014 - Journal of Business Ethics 124 (2):209-223.
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  • The Effects of the Perceived Behavioral Integrity of Managers on Employee Attitudes: A Meta-Analysis.Anne L. Davis & Hannah R. Rothstein - 2006 - Journal of Business Ethics 67 (4):407-419.
    Perceived behavioral integrity involves the employee’s perception of the alignment of the manager’s words and deeds. This meta-analysis examined the relationship between perceived behavioral integrity of managers and the employee attitudes of job satisfaction, organizational commitment, satisfaction with the leader and affect toward the organization. Results indicate a strong positive relationship overall (average r = 0.48, p<0.01). With only 12 studies included, exploration of moderators was limited, but preliminary analysis suggested that the gender of the employees and the number of (...)
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  • Nurses' Perception of Ethical Climate and Organizational Commitment.F. Borhani, T. Jalali, A. Abbaszadeh & A. Haghdoost - 2014 - Nursing Ethics 21 (3):278-288.
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  • Ethics Programs, Perceived Corporate Social Responsibility and Job Satisfaction.Sean Valentine & Gary Fleischman - 2008 - Journal of Business Ethics 77 (2):159-172.
    Companies offer ethics codes and training to increase employees' ethical conduct. These programs can also enhance individual work attitudes because ethical organizations are typically valued. Socially responsible companies are likely viewed as ethical organizations and should therefore prompt similar employee job responses. Using survey information collected from 313 business professionals, this exploratory study proposed that perceived corporate social responsibility would mediate the positive relationships between ethics codes/training and job satisfaction. Results indicated that corporate social responsibility fully or partially mediated the (...)
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  • Continuities and Extensions of Ethical Climate Theory: A Meta-Analytic Review.Kelly D. Martin & John B. Cullen - 2006 - Journal of Business Ethics 69 (2):175-194.
    Using traditional meta-analytic techniques, we compile relevant research to enhance conceptual appreciation of ethical climate theory (ECT) as it has been studied in the descriptive and applied ethics literature. We explore the various treatments of ethical climate to understand how the theoretical framework has developed. Furthermore, we provide a comprehensive picture of how the theory has been extended by describing the individual-level work climate outcomes commonly studied in this theoretical context. Meta-analysis allows us to resolve inconsistencies in previous findings as (...)
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  • Relationship Between Ethical Work Climate and Nurses’ Perception of Organizational Support, Commitment, Job Satisfaction and Turnover Intent.Ebtsam Aly Abou Hashish - 2017 - Nursing Ethics 24 (2):151-166.
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  • A Comparative Study of Ethical Perceptions of Managers and Non–Managers.Noel Y. M. Siu & Kit-Chun Joanna Lam - 2009 - Journal of Business Ethics 88 (S1):167 - 183.
    This study provides a comparison of the ethical perceptions of managers and non-managers, including professionals, teachers, sales persons and clerks, as well as technical and plant workers. Data of working individuals were collected in Hong Kong in the form of questionnaires which contain vignettes of questionable ethical issues. Factor analysis was used to identify the major ethical dimensions which were then used as the basis of comparison. Regression analyses were used to study the effect of various variables on ethical perceptions (...)
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  • A Comparative Study of Ethical Perceptions of Managers and Non-Managers.Noel Y. M. Siu & Kit-Chun Joanna Lam - 2009 - Journal of Business Ethics 88 (S1):167-183.
    This study provides a comparison of the ethical perceptions of managers and non-managers, including professionals, teachers, sales persons and clerks, as well as technical and plant workers. Data of working individuals were collected in Hong Kong in the form of questionnaires which contain vignettes of questionable ethical issues. Factor analysis was used to identify the major ethical dimensions which were then used as the basis of comparison. Regression analyses were used to study the effect of various variables on ethical perceptions (...)
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  • Does Ethical Leadership Lead to Happy Workers? A Study on the Impact of Ethical Leadership, Subjective Well-Being, and Life Happiness in the Chinese Culture.Conna Yang - 2014 - Journal of Business Ethics 123 (3):513-525.
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  • The Mediating Effect of Ethical Climate on the Relationship Between Paternalistic Leadership and Team Identification: A Team-Level Analysis in the Chinese Context.Meng-Yu Cheng & Lei Wang - 2015 - Journal of Business Ethics 129 (3):639-654.
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  • Corporation as a Crucial Ally Against Corruption.Reyes Calderón, José Luis Álvarez-Arce & Silvia Mayoral - 2009 - Journal of Business Ethics 87 (S1):319-332.
    Manuscript type Empirical. Research question/issue This paper aims to contribute to an improved theoretical and empirical understanding of the role that corporation has to play in anticorruption efforts. Research findings/insights Using cross-country data from three databases (Bribe Payers Index, Corruption Perceptions Index, and Doing Business) we found that pro-bribery Investment Climate conditions in host countries are not related to the payments of bribes by multinational companies when these corporations operate abroad. Theoretical/academic implications After describing the conceptual and policy framework that (...)
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  • Empowering Employee Sustainability: Perceived Organizational Support Toward the Environment.Cynthia King, Jennifer Tosti-Kharas & Eric Lamm - 2015 - Journal of Business Ethics 128 (1):207-220.
    This paper contributes to the ongoing discussion of sustainability behaviors by introducing the construct of perceived organizational support toward the environment. We propose and empirically test an integrated model whereby we test the association of POS-E with employees’ organizational citizenship behaviors toward the environment as well as to job attitudes. Results indicated that POS-E was positively related to OCB-E, job satisfaction, organizational identification, and psychological empowerment, and negatively related to turnover intentions. We also found that psychological empowerment partially mediated the (...)
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