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From “thought and language” to “thinking for speaking”

In J. Gumperz & S. Levinson (eds.), Rethinking Linguistic Relativity. Cambridge University Press. pp. 70--96 (1996)

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  1. Illocution and accommodation in the functioning of presumptions.Maciej Witek - 2019 - Synthese 198 (7):6207-6244.
    In this paper, I develop a speech-act based account of presumptions. Using a score-keeping model of illocutionary games, I argue that presumptions construed as speech acts can be grouped into three illocutionary act types defined by reference to how they affect the state of a conversation. The paper is organized into two parts. In the first one, I present the score-keeping model of speech act dynamics; in particular, I distinguish between two types of mechanisms—the direct mechanism of illocution and the (...)
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  • A Rule for Naming Objects.N. du Plessis - 2017 - Biological Theory 12 (1):39-49.
    It is proposed that the collective identification of objects is a necessary phase in the evolution of language. A procedure of identification based on the first-person perspective is assumed that is guided by object constancy, the naming insight, and other more obvious features of language production. The mental image is the basic element of this procedure. The comparison of mental images is used to define recognition, and the identification and naming of macroscopic objects by a group of persons is formulated. (...)
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  • Space and the Language‐Cognition Interface.Anna Papafragou - unknown
    According to classical theories of language and cognition, human cognition is characterized by strong universal commonalities built around notions such as object, space, agency, number, time, and event (Clark, 1973; Miller & Johnson‐Laird, 1976). Languages select from this prelinguistic conceptual repertoire the concepts that become encoded in their lexical and grammatical stock. Language acquisition, on this view, is a mapping process in which the learner needs to figure out which sounds in the language spoken in the environment correspond to which (...)
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  • Acquisition of English Relative Clauses by German L1 and Turkish L1 Speakers.Emin Yas - 2016 - Dissertation, Freie Universität Berlin
    The dissertation is a contrastive analysis. It deals with the acquisition of English relative clause (RC) by German and Turkish students(in Germany and Turkey) learning English as a second and third language and attending the 11th grades of a German school. The main question of the study is to find out whether the acquisition of English RCs is more difficult for German or for Turkish learners. The other study is the corpus analysis of the English relative clauses. For this research (...)
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  • Cultural and Individual Differences in Metaphorical Representations of Time.Li Heng - 2018 - Dissertation, Northumbria University
    concepts cannot be directly perceived through senses. How do people represent abstract concepts in their minds? According to the Conceptual Metaphor Theory, people tend to rely on concrete experiences to understand abstract concepts. For instance, cognitive science has shown that time is a metaphorically constituted conception, understood relative to concepts like space. Across many languages, the “past” is associated with the “back” and the “future” is associated with the “front”. However, space-time mappings in people’s spoken metaphors are not always consistent (...)
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  • Consistency in Motion Event Encoding Across Languages.Guillermo Montero-Melis - 2021 - Frontiers in Psychology 12.
    Syntactic templates serve as schemas, allowing speakers to describe complex events in a systematic fashion. Motion events have long served as a prime example of how different languages favor different syntactic frames, in turn biasing their speakers toward different event conceptualizations. However, there is also variability in how motion events are syntactically framed within languages. Here, we measure the consistency in event encoding in two languages, Spanish and Swedish. We test a dominant account in the literature, namely that variability within (...)
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  • Is color experience linguistically penetrable?Raquel Krempel - forthcoming - Synthese:1-25.
    I address the question of whether differences in color terminology cause differences in color experience in speakers of different languages. If linguistic representations directly affect color experience, then this is a case of what I call the linguistic penetrability of perception, which is a particular case of cognitive penetrability. I start with some general considerations about cognitive penetration and its alleged occurrence in the memory color effect. I then apply similar considerations to the interpretation of empirical studies of color perception (...)
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  • Pragmatic markers: the missing link between language and Theory of Mind.Paula Rubio-Fernandez - forthcoming - Synthese:1-34.
    Language and Theory of Mind come together in communication, but their relationship has been intensely contested. I hypothesize that pragmatic markers connect language and Theory of Mind and enable their co-development and co-evolution through a positive feedback loop, whereby the development of one skill boosts the development of the other. I propose to test this hypothesis by investigating two types of pragmatic markers: demonstratives and articles. Pragmatic markers are closed-class words that encode non-representational information that is unavailable to consciousness, but (...)
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  • Grammatical Gender and Inferences About Biological Properties in German-Speaking Children.Henrik Saalbach, Mutsumi Imai & Lennart Schalk - 2012 - Cognitive Science 36 (7):1251-1267.
    In German, nouns are assigned to one of the three gender classes. For most animal names, however, the assignment is independent of the referent’s biological sex. We examined whether German-speaking children understand this independence of grammar from semantics or whether they assume that grammatical gender is mapped onto biological sex when drawing inferences about sex-specific biological properties of animals. Two cross-linguistic studies comparing German-speaking and Japanese-speaking preschoolers were conducted. The results suggest that German-speaking children utilize grammatical gender as a cue (...)
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  • Processing Spatial Relations With Different Apertures of Attention.Bruno Laeng, Matia Okubo, Ayako Saneyoshi & Chikashi Michimata - 2011 - Cognitive Science 35 (2):297-329.
    Neuropsychological studies suggest the existence of lateralized networks that represent categorical and coordinate types of spatial information. In addition, studies with neural networks have shown that they encode more effectively categorical spatial judgments or coordinate spatial judgments, if their input is based, respectively, on units with relatively small, nonoverlapping receptive fields, as opposed to units with relatively large, overlapping receptive fields. These findings leave open the question of whether interactive processes between spatial detectors and types of spatial relations can be (...)
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  • Using the Hands to Identify Who Does What to Whom: Gesture and Speech Go Hand‐in‐Hand.Wing Chee So, Sotaro Kita & Susan Goldin-Meadow - 2009 - Cognitive Science 33 (1):115-125.
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  • Is Tuba Masculine or Feminine? The Timing of Grammatical Gender.Sara Incera, Conor T. McLennan, Lisa M. Stronsick & Emily E. Zetzer - 2019 - Mind and Language 34 (5):667-680.
    Mind &Language, Volume 34, Issue 5, Page 667-680, November 2019.
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  • Language Usage and Second Language Morphosyntax: Effects of Availability, Reliability, and Formulaicity.Rundi Guo & Nick C. Ellis - 2021 - Frontiers in Psychology 12.
    A large body of psycholinguistic research demonstrates that both language processing and language acquisition are sensitive to the distributions of linguistic constructions in usage. Here we investigate how statistical distributions at different linguistic levels – morphological and lexical, and phrasal – contribute to the ease with which morphosyntax is processed and produced by second language learners. We analyze Chinese ESL learners’ knowledge of four English inflectional morphemes: -ed, -ing, and third-person -s on verbs, and plural -s on nouns. In Elicited (...)
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  • Duration as Length Vs Amount in English and Spanish: A Corpus Study.Daniel Alcaraz Carrion & Javier Valenzuela - 2021 - Metaphor and Symbol 36 (2):74-84.
    Previous psycholinguistic studies have suggested that English and Spanish express temporal duration through different metaphors. English tends to use the time-as-length metaphor (e.g. I have been w...
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  • Comment on “Language and Emotion”: Metaphor, Morality and Contested Concepts.Debi Roberson & Lydia Whitaker - 2016 - Emotion Review 8 (3):282-283.
    The nature of emotion concepts and whether there are any that are universally “basic” remains controversial, as acknowledged in the article “Language and Emotion.” The suggestion that some emotions are embodied through a process of association between neural networks for bodily sensations and neural circuitry dedicated to linguistic metaphor is interesting, but speculative. However, it is a hypothesis that risks relegating speakers of languages that lack sophisticated metaphors to a lower level on some scale of linguistic evolution.
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  • Culture Blind Leadership Research: How Semantically Determined Survey Data May Fail to Detect Cultural Differences.Jan Ketil Arnulf & Kai R. Larsen - 2020 - Frontiers in Psychology 11.
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  • Space in Hand and Mind: Gesture and Spatial Frames of Reference in Bilingual Mexico.Tyler Marghetis, Melanie McComsey & Kensy Cooperrider - 2020 - Cognitive Science 44 (12).
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  • The Effect of Language‐Specific Characteristics on English and Japanese Speakers' Ability to Recall Number Information.Minna Kirjavainen, Yuriko Kite & Anna E. Piasecki - 2020 - Cognitive Science 44 (12).
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  • Seeing From Without, Seeing From Within: Aspectual Differences Between Spanish and Russian.Laura A. Janda & Antonio Fábregas - 2019 - Cognitive Linguistics 30 (4):687-718.
    Journal Name: Cognitive Linguistics Issue: Ahead of print.
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  • On the Origins of Semiosic Translation, the Role of Semiosis in Translation and Translating and the Nature of Sign Systems: Response to Jia.Sergio Torres-Martínez - 2020 - Semiotica 2020 (236-237):377-394.
    In this response paper, I trace the origins of semiosic translation and explain why Jia’s interpretations are theoretically problematic. I also demonstrate that the view of translation endorsed by Jia is untenable from a cognitive perspective, since both perception and action are affordances of the living organisms and hence are not restricted to the “thinking mind” within a Lotmanian semiosphere. Finally, since translation is not a special case of semiosis, I show that semiosic processes, and not individual signs, are the (...)
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  • Temporal Expressions in English and Spanish: Influence of Typology and Metaphorical Construal.Javier Valenzuela & Daniel Alcaraz Carrión - 2020 - Frontiers in Psychology 11.
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  • Linguistic Relativity and Its Relation to Analytic Philosophy.Filippo Batisti - 2017 - Studia Semiotyczne 31 (2):201-226.
    The history of so-called ‘linguistic relativity’ is an odd and multifaceted one. After knowing alternate fortunes and being treated by different academic branches, today there are some new ways of investigating the language-thought-reality problem that put into dialogue the latest trends in language-related disciplines generate room for philosophical themes previously overlooked, reassess the very idea of linguistic relativity, despite its popularized versions which have circulated for decades and which have led an otherwise fruitful debate to extremes. It is argued that (...)
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  • Language May Indeed Influence Thought.Jordan Zlatev & Johan Blomberg - 2015 - Frontiers in Psychology 6.
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  • Gauging the Impact of Gender Grammaticization in Different Languages: Application of a Linguistic-Visual Paradigm.Sayaka Sato, Pascal M. Gygax & Ute Gabriel - 2016 - Frontiers in Psychology 7.
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  • Motion Event Similarity Judgments in One or Two Languages: An Exploration of Monolingual Speakers of English and Chinese Vs. L2 Learners of English.Yinglin Ji - 2017 - Frontiers in Psychology 8.
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  • Cognitive Representation of Spontaneous Motion in a Second Language: An Exploration of Chinese Learners of English.Yinglin Ji - 2019 - Frontiers in Psychology 10.
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  • How Grammar Introduces Asymmetry Into Cognitive Structures: Compositional Semantics, Metaphors, and Schematological Hybrids.David Gil & Yeshayahu Shen - 2019 - Frontiers in Psychology 10.
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  • Neurobiological Mechanisms for Semantic Feature Extraction and Conceptual Flexibility.Friedemann Pulvermüller - 2018 - Topics in Cognitive Science 10 (3):590-620.
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  • Blind Speakers Show Language-Specific Patterns in Co-Speech Gesture but Not Silent Gesture.Şeyda Özçalışkan, Ché Lucero & Susan Goldin-Meadow - 2018 - Cognitive Science 42 (3):1001-1014.
    Sighted speakers of different languages vary systematically in how they package and order components of a motion event in speech. These differences influence how semantic elements are organized in gesture, but only when those gestures are produced with speech, not without speech. We ask whether the cross-linguistic similarity in silent gesture is driven by the visuospatial structure of the event. We compared 40 congenitally blind adult native speakers of English or Turkish to 80 sighted adult speakers as they described three-dimensional (...)
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  • Keeping the Result in Sight and Mind: General Cognitive Principles and Language‐Specific Influences in the Perception and Memory of Resultative Events.Maria Sakarias & Monique Flecken - 2019 - Cognitive Science 43 (1):e12708.
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  • Which Is in Front of Chinese People, Past or Future? The Effect of Language and Culture on Temporal Gestures and Spatial Conceptions of Time.Yan Gu, Yeqiu Zheng & Marc Swerts - 2019 - Cognitive Science 43 (12).
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  • Sculptors, Architects, and Painters Conceive of Depicted Spaces Differently.Claudia Cialone, Thora Tenbrink & Hugo J. Spiers - 2018 - Cognitive Science 42 (2):524-553.
    Sculptors, architects, and painters are three professional groups that require a comprehensive understanding of how to manipulate spatial structures. While it has been speculated that they may differ in the way they conceive of space due to the different professional demands, this has not been empirically tested. To achieve this, we asked architects, painters, sculptors, and a control group questions about spatially complex pictures. Verbalizations elicited were examined using cognitive discourse analysis. We found significant differences between each group. Only painters (...)
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  • Does Grammatical Aspect Affect Motion Event Cognition? A Cross-Linguistic Comparison of English and Swedish Speakers.Panos Athanasopoulos & Emanuel Bylund - 2013 - Cognitive Science 37 (2):286-309.
    In this article, we explore whether cross-linguistic differences in grammatical aspect encoding may give rise to differences in memory and cognition. We compared native speakers of two languages that encode aspect differently (English and Swedish) in four tasks that examined verbal descriptions of stimuli, online triads matching, and memory-based triads matching with and without verbal interference. Results showed between-group differences in verbal descriptions and in memory-based triads matching. However, no differences were found in online triads matching and in memory-based triads (...)
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  • Does Language Shape Silent Gesture?Şeyda Özçalışkan, Ché Lucero & Susan Goldin-Meadow - 2016 - Cognition 148:10-18.
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  • Turning the Tables: Language and Spatial Reasoning.Peggy Li & Lila Gleitman - 2002 - Cognition 83 (3):265-294.
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  • Motion Events in Language and Cognition.S. Gennari - 2002 - Cognition 83 (1):49-79.
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  • On the Road to Somewhere: Brain Potentials Reflect Language Effects on Motion Event Perception.Monique Flecken, Panos Athanasopoulos, Jan Rouke Kuipers & Guillaume Thierry - 2015 - Cognition 141:41-51.
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  • Motion Through Syntactic Frames.Michele I. Feist - 2010 - Cognition 115 (1):192-196.
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  • Mental Rotation Within Linguistic and Non-Linguistic Domains in Users of American Sign Language.K. Emmorey - 1998 - Cognition 68 (3):221-246.
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  • With the Future Behind Them: Convergent Evidence From Aymara Language and Gesture in the Crosslinguistic Comparison of Spatial Construals of Time.Rafael E. Núñez & Eve Sweetser - 2006 - Cognitive Science 30 (3):401-450.
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  • All Giraffes Have Female‐Specific Properties: Influence of Grammatical Gender on Deductive Reasoning About Sex‐Specific Properties in German Speakers.Mutsumi Imai, Lennart Schalk, Henrik Saalbach & Hiroyuki Okada - 2014 - Cognitive Science 38 (3):514-536.
    Grammatical gender is independent of biological sex for the majority of animal names (e.g., any giraffe, be it male or female, is grammatically treated as feminine). However, there is apparent semantic motivation for grammatical gender classes, especially in mapping human terms to gender. This research investigated whether this motivation affects deductive inference in native German speakers. We compared German with Japanese speakers (a language without grammatical gender) when making inferences about sex-specific biological properties. We found that German speakers tended to (...)
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  • Connectionist Models of Language Production: Lexical Access and Grammatical Encoding.Gary S. Dell, Franklin Chang & Zenzi M. Griffin - 1999 - Cognitive Science 23 (4):517-542.
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  • The Semantic Origins of Word Order.Marieke Schouwstra & Henriëtte de Swart - 2014 - Cognition 131 (3):431-436.
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  • Shake, Rattle, 'N' Roll: The Representation of Motion in Language and Cognition.Anna Papafragou - 2002 - Cognition 84 (2):189-219.
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  • Does Language Guide Event Perception? Evidence From Eye Movements.Anna Papafragou, Justin Hulbert & John Trueswell - 2008 - Cognition 108 (1):155.
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  • Spatial Language and Spatial Representation: A Cross-Linguistic Comparison.Edward Munnich, Barbara Landau & Barbara Anne Dosher - 2001 - Cognition 81 (3):171-208.
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  • Verbal Labels Facilitate Tactile Perception.Tally McCormick Miller, Timo Torsten Schmidt, Felix Blankenburg & Friedemann Pulvermüller - 2018 - Cognition 171:172-179.
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  • The Relation Between Event Apprehension and Utterance Formulation in Children: Evidence From Linguistic Omissions.Ann Bunger, John C. Trueswell & Anna Papafragou - 2012 - Cognition 122 (2):135-149.
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  • Episodic Memory Isn't Essentially Autonoetic.Peter Carruthers - 2018 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 41.
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  • Tight and Loose Are Not Created Equal: An Asymmetry Underlying the Representation of Fit in English- and Korean-Speakers.Heather M. Norbury, Sandra R. Waxman & Hyun-Joo Song - 2008 - Cognition 109 (3):316-325.
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