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From “thought and language” to “thinking for speaking”

In J. Gumperz & S. Levinson (eds.), Rethinking Linguistic Relativity. Cambridge University Press. pp. 70--96 (1996)

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  1. The Influence of Language in Conceptualization: Three Views.Agustin Vicente & Fernando Martinez-Manrique - 2013 - ProtoSociology 20:89-106.
    Different languages carve the world in different categories. They also encode events in different ways, conventionalize different metaphorical mappings, and differ in their rule-based metonymies and patterns of meaning extensions. A long-standing, and controversial, question is whether this variability in the languages generates a corresponding variability in the conceptual structure of the speakers of those languages. Here we will present and discuss three interesting general proposals by focusing on representative authors of such proposals. The proposals are the following: first, that (...)
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  • The Nature of Unsymbolized Thinking.Agustin Vicente & Fernando Martinez-Manrique - 2016 - Philosophical Explorations 19 (2):173-187.
    Using the method of Descriptive Experience Sampling, some subjects report experiences of thinking that do not involve words or any other symbols [Hurlburt, R. T., and C. L. Heavey. 2006. Exploring Inner Experience. Amsterdam: John Benjamins; Hurlburt, R. T., and S. A. Akhter. 2008. “Unsymbolized Thinking.” Consciousness and Cognition 17 : 1364–1374]. Even though the possibility of this unsymbolized thinking has consequences for the debate on the phenomenological status of cognitive states, the phenomenon is still insufficiently examined. This paper analyzes (...)
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  • Language and Literacy : Some Fundamental Issues in Research on Reading and Writing.Per Henning Uppstad - unknown
    Mainstream research on reading and writing is based on the assumption, common in modern linguistics, that spoken language is primary to written language in most important respects. Unfortunately, the conceptual framework for the study of language and 'literacy' is built around this assumption. This is problematic with regard to the philosophy of science, since this framework lacks sufficient empirical support. It is claimed in the present thesis that a view of spoken and written language as distinct - but not isolated (...)
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  • Cultural and Individual Differences in Metaphorical Representations of Time.Li Heng - 2018 - Dissertation, Northumbria University
    concepts cannot be directly perceived through senses. How do people represent abstract concepts in their minds? According to the Conceptual Metaphor Theory, people tend to rely on concrete experiences to understand abstract concepts. For instance, cognitive science has shown that time is a metaphorically constituted conception, understood relative to concepts like space. Across many languages, the “past” is associated with the “back” and the “future” is associated with the “front”. However, space-time mappings in people’s spoken metaphors are not always consistent (...)
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  • The Cognitive Functions of Language.Peter Carruthers - 2002 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 25 (6):657-674.
    This paper explores a variety of different versions of the thesis that natural language is involved in human thinking. It distinguishes amongst strong and weak forms of this thesis, dismissing some as implausibly strong and others as uninterestingly weak. Strong forms dismissed include the view that language is conceptually necessary for thought (endorsed by many philosophers) and the view that language is _de facto_ the medium of all human conceptual thinking (endorsed by many philosophers and social scientists). Weak forms include (...)
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  • El pensamiento incorporado percepcional-lingüístico-lógico/The embodied, perceptional, linguistic and logic thougth.Rómulo Sanmartin - 2012 - Sophia. Colección de Filosofía de la Educación 13:26-72.
    El pensamiento es incorporado por la articulación de los dos algoritmos: la estructura interna para conocer y la realidad, externa, a ser reconocida. La realidad interna está dada desde la estructura de la lengua, la cual más adelante dará lugar a un formato lógica-matemática. La realidad externa, que es también antropológica, está mediada por las áreas somatosensoriales cerebrales, que protológicamente acercan a lo distinto del humano. La filosofía y la ciencia tienen la tarea de acercarse a estas realidades para enhebrarlas, (...)
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  • On the Road to Somewhere: Brain Potentials Reflect Language Effects on Motion Event Perception.Monique Flecken, Panos Athanasopoulos, Jan Rouke Kuipers & Guillaume Thierry - 2015 - Cognition 141:41-51.
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  • Moving Ourselves, Moving Others: Motion and Emotion in Intersubjectivity, Consciousness, and Language.Andrea Schiavio - 2015 - Philosophical Psychology 28 (5):735-739.
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  • Sculptors, Architects, and Painters Conceive of Depicted Spaces Differently.Claudia Cialone, Thora Tenbrink & Hugo J. Spiers - 2018 - Cognitive Science 42 (2):524-553.
    Sculptors, architects, and painters are three professional groups that require a comprehensive understanding of how to manipulate spatial structures. While it has been speculated that they may differ in the way they conceive of space due to the different professional demands, this has not been empirically tested. To achieve this, we asked architects, painters, sculptors, and a control group questions about spatially complex pictures. Verbalizations elicited were examined using cognitive discourse analysis. We found significant differences between each group. Only painters (...)
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  • Does Language Guide Event Perception? Evidence From Eye Movements.Anna Papafragou, Justin Hulbert & John Trueswell - 2008 - Cognition 108 (1):155.
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  • Language and Perceptual Categorisation.Jules Davidoff - 2001 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 5 (9):382-387.
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  • Tight and Loose Are Not Created Equal: An Asymmetry Underlying the Representation of Fit in English- and Korean-Speakers.Heather M. Norbury, Sandra R. Waxman & Hyun-Joo Song - 2008 - Cognition 109 (3):316-325.
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  • Turning the Tables: Language and Spatial Reasoning.Peggy Li & Lila Gleitman - 2002 - Cognition 83 (3):265-294.
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  • Motion Events in Language and Cognition.S. Gennari - 2002 - Cognition 83 (1):49-79.
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  • Towards a Universal Model of Reading.Ram Frost, Christina Behme, Madeleine El Beveridge, Thomas H. Bak, Jeffrey S. Bowers, Max Coltheart, Stephen Crain, Colin J. Davis, S. Hélène Deacon & Laurie Beth Feldman - 2012 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 35 (5):263.
    In the last decade, reading research has seen a paradigmatic shift. A new wave of computational models of orthographic processing that offer various forms of noisy position or context-sensitive coding have revolutionized the field of visual word recognition. The influx of such models stems mainly from consistent findings, coming mostly from European languages, regarding an apparent insensitivity of skilled readers to letter order. Underlying the current revolution is the theoretical assumption that the insensitivity of readers to letter order reflects the (...)
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  • Using the Hands to Identify Who Does What to Whom: Gesture and Speech Go Hand‐in‐Hand.Wing Chee So, Sotaro Kita & Susan Goldin-Meadow - 2009 - Cognitive Science 33 (1):115-125.
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  • The Relation Between Event Apprehension and Utterance Formulation in Children: Evidence From Linguistic Omissions.Ann Bunger, John C. Trueswell & Anna Papafragou - 2012 - Cognition 122 (2):135-149.
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  • Do Language-Specific Categories Shape Conceptual Processing? Mandarin Classifier Distinctions Influence Eye Gaze Behavior, but Only During Linguistic Processing.Falk Huettig, Asifa Majid, Jidong Chen & Melissa Bowerman - 2010 - Journal of Cognition and Culture 10 (1-2):39-58.
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  • Evidence Against Linguistic Relativity in Chinese and English: A Case Study of Spatial and Temporal Metaphors.Chi-Shing Tse & Jeanette Altarriba - 2008 - Journal of Cognition and Culture 8 (3-4):335-357.
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  • Neurobiological Mechanisms for Semantic Feature Extraction and Conceptual Flexibility.Friedemann Pulvermüller - 2018 - Topics in Cognitive Science 10 (3):590-620.
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  • Temporal Frames of Reference: Conceptual Analysis and Empirical Evidence From German, English, Mandarin Chinese and Tongan.Andrea Bender, Sieghard Beller & Giovanni Bennardo - 2010 - Journal of Cognition and Culture 10 (3-4):283-307.
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  • The Translation of Motion Events From Spanish Into English: A Cross-Linguistic Perspective.Rosa Alonso Alonso - 2011 - Perspectives 19 (4):353-366.
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  • Language is an Instrument for Thought. Really?Jan Nuyts - 2012 - Pragmatics and Cognition 20 (2):317-333.
    This discussion article addresses the assumption formulated in Dan Everett's new book Language: The Cultural Tool that language is not only an instrument for communication, but also an instrument for thought. It argues that the latter assumption is far from obvious, and that, in any case, one cannot put communication and thought on a par in discussing the functionality of language.
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  • Understanding Others Requires Adaptive Thinking: Response to Wierzbicka.Daniel L. Everett - 2012 - Pragmatics and Cognition 20 (2):417-428.
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  • When English Proposes What Greek Presupposes: The Cross-Linguistic Encoding of Motion Events.Lila Gleitman - 2006 - Cognition 98 (3):75-87.
    How do we talk about events we perceive? And how tight is the connection between linguistic and non-linguistic representations of events? To address these questions, we experimentally compared motion descriptions produced by children and adults in two typologically distinct languages, Greek and English. Our findings confirm a well-known asymmetry between the two languages, such that English speakers are overall more likely to include manner of motion information than Greek speakers. However, mention of manner of motion in Greek speakers' descriptions increases (...)
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  • Shake, Rattle, 'N' Roll: The Representation of Motion in Language and Cognition.Anna Papafragou - 2002 - Cognition 84 (2):189-219.
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  • Motion Event Conflation and Clause Structure.Anna Papafragou - manuscript
    How do languages of the world refer to motion? According to one widely held view, languages draw on a pool of common ‘building blocks’ in representing motion events, such as figure and ground, path (or trajectory), manner, cause of motion, and so on (cf. Talmy, 1985). Nevertheless, individual languages differ both in the elements they select out of the available stock of motion ‘primitives’ and in the way they conflate them into specific lexical and clausal structures (Talmy, 1985; Slobin, 1996a; (...)
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  • Language May Indeed Influence Thought.Jordan Zlatev & Johan Blomberg - 2015 - Frontiers in Psychology 6.
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  • Motion Event Similarity Judgments in One or Two Languages: An Exploration of Monolingual Speakers of English and Chinese Vs. L2 Learners of English.Yinglin Ji - 2017 - Frontiers in Psychology 8.
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  • Tongue-Tied: Rawls, Political Philosophy and Metalinguistic Awareness.Yael Peled & Matteo Bonotti - unknown
    Is our moral cognition “colored” by the language that we speak? Despite the centrality of language to political life and agency, limited attempts have been made thus far in contemporary political philosophy to consider this possibility. We therefore set out to explore the possible influence of linguistic relativity effects on political thinking in linguistically diverse societies. We begin by introducing the facts and fallacies of the “linguistic relativity” principle, and explore the various ways in which they “color,” often covertly, current (...)
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  • Spatial Language and Spatial Representation: A Cross-Linguistic Comparison.Edward Munnich, Barbara Landau & Barbara Anne Dosher - 2001 - Cognition 81 (3):171-208.
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  • Mental Rotation Within Linguistic and Non-Linguistic Domains in Users of American Sign Language.K. Emmorey - 1998 - Cognition 68 (3):221-246.
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  • Influence of Grammatical Gender on Deductive Reasoning About Sex-Specific Properties of Animals.Mutsumi Imai, Lennart Schalk, Henrik Saalbach & Hiroyuki Okada - 2010 - In S. Ohlsson & R. Catrambone (eds.), Proceedings of the 32nd Annual Conference of the Cognitive Science Society. Cognitive Science Society.
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  • Grammatical Gender and Inferences About Biological Properties in German-Speaking Children.Henrik Saalbach, Mutsumi Imai & Lennart Schalk - 2012 - Cognitive Science 36 (7):1251-1267.
    In German, nouns are assigned to one of the three gender classes. For most animal names, however, the assignment is independent of the referent’s biological sex. We examined whether German-speaking children understand this independence of grammar from semantics or whether they assume that grammatical gender is mapped onto biological sex when drawing inferences about sex-specific biological properties of animals. Two cross-linguistic studies comparing German-speaking and Japanese-speaking preschoolers were conducted. The results suggest that German-speaking children utilize grammatical gender as a cue (...)
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  • The Role of Language in Acquiring Object Kind Concepts in Infancy.Fei Xu - 2002 - Cognition 85 (3):223-250.
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  • When English Proposes What Greek Presupposes: The Cross-Linguistic Encoding of Motion Events.Anna Papafragou - 2006 - Cognition 98 (3):75-87.
    How do we talk about events we perceive? And how tight is the connection between linguistic and non-linguistic representations of events? To address these questions, we experimentally compared motion descriptions produced by children and adults in two typologically distinct languages, Greek and English. Our findings confirm a well-known asymmetry between the two languages, such that English speakers are overall more likely to include manner of motion information than Greek speakers. However, mention of manner of motion in Greek speakers' descriptions increases (...)
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  • Keeping the Result in Sight and Mind: General Cognitive Principles and Language‐Specific Influences in the Perception and Memory of Resultative Events.Maria Sakarias & Monique Flecken - 2019 - Cognitive Science 43 (1):e12708.
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  • Connectionist Models of Language Production: Lexical Access and Grammatical Encoding.Gary S. Dell, Franklin Chang & Zenzi M. Griffin - 1999 - Cognitive Science 23 (4):517-542.
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  • How Language Acquisition Builds on Cognitive Development.Eve V. Clark - 2004 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 8 (10):472-478.
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  • Motion Through Syntactic Frames.Michele I. Feist - 2010 - Cognition 115 (1):192-196.
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  • ZhaoHong Han and Teresa Cadierno (Eds), Linguistic Relativity in SLA: Thinking for Speaking.Jacob L. Mey - 2014 - Pragmatics and Society 5 (1):156-163.
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  • Verbal Labels Facilitate Tactile Perception.Tally McCormick Miller, Timo Torsten Schmidt, Felix Blankenburg & Friedemann Pulvermüller - 2018 - Cognition 171:172-179.
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  • The Semantic Origins of Word Order.Marieke Schouwstra & Henriëtte de Swart - 2014 - Cognition 131 (3):431-436.
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  • Blind Speakers Show Language-Specific Patterns in Co-Speech Gesture but Not Silent Gesture.Şeyda Özçalışkan, Ché Lucero & Susan Goldin-Meadow - 2018 - Cognitive Science 42 (3):1001-1014.
    Sighted speakers of different languages vary systematically in how they package and order components of a motion event in speech. These differences influence how semantic elements are organized in gesture, but only when those gestures are produced with speech, not without speech. We ask whether the cross-linguistic similarity in silent gesture is driven by the visuospatial structure of the event. We compared 40 congenitally blind adult native speakers of English or Turkish to 80 sighted adult speakers as they described three-dimensional (...)
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  • Does Grammatical Aspect Affect Motion Event Cognition? A Cross-Linguistic Comparison of English and Swedish Speakers.Panos Athanasopoulos & Emanuel Bylund - 2013 - Cognitive Science 37 (2):286-309.
    In this article, we explore whether cross-linguistic differences in grammatical aspect encoding may give rise to differences in memory and cognition. We compared native speakers of two languages that encode aspect differently (English and Swedish) in four tasks that examined verbal descriptions of stimuli, online triads matching, and memory-based triads matching with and without verbal interference. Results showed between-group differences in verbal descriptions and in memory-based triads matching. However, no differences were found in online triads matching and in memory-based triads (...)
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  • Episodic Memory Isn't Essentially Autonoetic.Peter Carruthers - 2018 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 41.
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  • With the Future Behind Them: Convergent Evidence From Aymara Language and Gesture in the Crosslinguistic Comparison of Spatial Construals of Time.Rafael E. Núñez & Eve Sweetser - 2006 - Cognitive Science 30 (3):401-450.
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  • The Case of the Missing Pronouns: Does Mentally Simulated Perspective Play a Functional Role in the Comprehension of Person?Manami Sato & Benjamin K. Bergen - 2013 - Cognition 127 (3):361-374.
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  • Reviving Whorf: The Return of Linguistic Relativity.Maria Francisca Reines & Jesse Prinz - 2009 - Philosophy Compass 4 (6):1022-1032.
    The idea that natural languages shape the way we think in different ways was popularized by Benjamin Whorf, but then fell out of favor for lack of empirical support. But now, a new wave of research has been shifting the tide back toward linguistic relativity. The recent research can be interpreted in different ways, some trivial, some implausibly radical, and some both plausible and interesting. We introduce two theses that would have important implications if true: Habitual Whorfianism and Ontological Whorfianism. (...)
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  • Does Language Shape Silent Gesture?Şeyda Özçalışkan, Ché Lucero & Susan Goldin-Meadow - 2016 - Cognition 148:10-18.
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