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  1. Concept Empiricism and the Vehicles of Thought.Daniel A. Weiskopf - 2007 - Journal of Consciousness Studies 14 (9-10):156-183.
    Concept empiricists are committed to the claim that the vehicles of thought are re-activated perceptual representations. Evidence for empiricism comes from a range of neuroscientific studies showing that perceptual regions of the brain are employed during cognitive tasks such as categorization and inference. I examine the extant neuroscientific evidence and argue that it falls short of establishing this core empiricist claim. During conceptual tasks, the causal structure of the brain produces widespread activity in both perceptual and non-perceptual systems. I lay (...)
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  • The Symbol Grounding Problem.Stevan Harnad - 1990 - Physica D 42:335-346.
    There has been much discussion recently about the scope and limits of purely symbolic models of the mind and about the proper role of connectionism in cognitive modeling. This paper describes the symbol grounding problem : How can the semantic interpretation of a formal symbol system be made intrinsic to the system, rather than just parasitic on the meanings in our heads? How can the meanings of the meaningless symbol tokens, manipulated solely on the basis of their shapes, be grounded (...)
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  • Perceptual Symbol Systems.Lawrence W. Barsalou - 1999 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 22 (4):577-660.
    Prior to the twentieth century, theories of knowledge were inherently perceptual. Since then, developments in logic, statis- tics, and programming languages have inspired amodal theories that rest on principles fundamentally different from those underlying perception. In addition, perceptual approaches have become widely viewed as untenable because they are assumed to implement record- ing systems, not conceptual systems. A perceptual theory of knowledge is developed here in the context of current cognitive science and neuroscience. During perceptual experience, association areas in the (...)
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  • Embodiment and Language Comprehension: Reframing the Discussion.Rolf A. Zwaan - 2014 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 18 (5):229-234.
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  • Beyond Perceptual Symbols: A Call for Representational Pluralism.Guy Dove - 2009 - Cognition 110 (3):412-431.
    Recent evidence from cognitive neuroscience suggests that certain cognitive processes employ perceptual representations. Inspired by this evidence, a few researchers have proposed that cognition is inherently perceptual. They have developed an innovative theoretical approach that rests on the notion of perceptual simulation and marshaled several general arguments supporting the centrality of perceptual representations to concepts. In this article, I identify a number of weaknesses in these arguments and defend a multiple semantic code approach that posits both perceptual and non-perceptual representations.
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  • Six Views of Embodied Cognition.Margaret Wilson - 2002 - Psychonomic Bulletin and Review 9 (4):625--636.
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  • Integrating Experiential and Distributional Data to Learn Semantic Representations.Mark Andrews, Gabriella Vigliocco & David Vinson - 2009 - Psychological Review 116 (3):463-498.
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  • Reconciling Embodied and Distributional Accounts of Meaning in Language.Mark Andrews, Stefan Frank & Gabriella Vigliocco - 2014 - Topics in Cognitive Science 6 (3):359-370.
    Over the past 15 years, there have been two increasingly popular approaches to the study of meaning in cognitive science. One, based on theories of embodied cognition, treats meaning as a simulation of perceptual and motor states. An alternative approach treats meaning as a consequence of the statistical distribution of words across spoken and written language. On the surface, these appear to be opposing scientific paradigms. In this review, we aim to show how recent cross-disciplinary developments have done much to (...)
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  • An Embodied Model for Sensorimotor Grounding and Grounding Transfer: Experiments With Epigenetic Robots.Angelo Cangelosi & Thomas Riga - 2006 - Cognitive Science 30 (4):673-689.
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  • Spatial Representations Activated During Real‐Time Comprehension of Verbs.Daniel C. Richardson, Michael J. Spivey, Lawrence W. Barsalou & Ken McRae - 2003 - Cognitive Science 27 (5):767-780.
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  • Symbol Interdependency in Symbolic and Embodied Cognition.Max M. Louwerse - 2011 - Topics in Cognitive Science 3 (2):273-302.
    Whether computational algorithms such as latent semantic analysis (LSA) can both extract meaning from language and advance theories of human cognition has become a topic of debate in cognitive science, whereby accounts of symbolic cognition and embodied cognition are often contrasted. Albeit for different reasons, in both accounts the importance of statistical regularities in linguistic surface structure tends to be underestimated. The current article gives an overview of the symbolic and embodied cognition accounts and shows how meaning induction attributed to (...)
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  • Thought and Language.A. L. Wilkes, L. S. Vygotsky, E. Hanfmann & G. Vakar - 1962 - Philosophical Quarterly 14 (55):178.
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  • Are Abstract Action Words Embodied? An fMRI Investigation at the Interface Between Language and Motor Cognition.Katrin Sakreida, Claudia Scorolli, Mareike M. Menz, Stefan Heim, Anna M. Borghi & Ferdinand Binkofski - 2013 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.
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  • Is There a Semantic System for Abstract Words?Tim Shallice & Richard P. Cooper - 2013 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.
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  • Principles of Categorization.Eleanor Rosch - 1988 - In Allan Collins & Edward E. Smith (eds.), Readings in Cognitive Science, a Perspective From Psychology and Artificial Intelligence. Morgan Kaufmann Publishers. pp. 312-22.
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  • Concept Empiricism: A Methodological Critique.Edouard Machery - 2006 - Cognition 104 (1):19-46.
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  • The Shared Circuits Model (SCM): How Control, Mirroring, and Simulation Can Enable Imitation, Deliberation, and Mindreading.Susan Hurley - 2008 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 31 (1):1-22.
    Imitation, deliberation, and mindreading are characteristically human sociocognitive skills. Research on imitation and its role in social cognition is flourishing across various disciplines. Imitation is surveyed in this target article under headings of behavior, subpersonal mechanisms, and functions of imitation. A model is then advanced within which many of the developments surveyed can be located and explained. The shared circuits model (SCM) explains how imitation, deliberation, and mindreading can be enabled by subpersonal mechanisms of control, mirroring, and simulation. It is (...)
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  • Brain Reflections of Words and Their Meaning.Friedemann Pulvermüller - 2001 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 5 (12):517-524.
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  • Embodied Cognition is Not What You Think It Is.Andrew D. Wilson & Sabrina Golonka - 2013 - Frontiers in Psychology 4.
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  • Clustering, Hierarchical Organization, and the Topography of Abstract and Concrete Nouns.Joshua Troche, Sebastian Crutch & Jamie Reilly - 2014 - Frontiers in Psychology 5.
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  • Redundancy in Perceptual and Linguistic Experience: Comparing Feature-Based and Distributional Models of Semantic Representation.Brian Riordan & Michael N. Jones - 2011 - Topics in Cognitive Science 3 (2):303-345.
    Abstract Since their inception, distributional models of semantics have been criticized as inadequate cognitive theories of human semantic learning and representation. A principal challenge is that the representations derived by distributional models are purely symbolic and are not grounded in perception and action; this challenge has led many to favor feature-based models of semantic representation. We argue that the amount of perceptual and other semantic information that can be learned from purely distributional statistics has been underappreciated. We compare the representations (...)
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  • The Neural Bases of Complex Tool Use in Humans.Scott H. Johnson-Frey - 2004 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 8 (2):71-78.
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  • Furnishing the Mind: Concepts and Their Perceptual Basis.Jesse J. Prinz - 2002 - Mind 113 (449):210-214.
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  • Reconceiving Conceptual Vehicles: Lessons From Semantic Dementia.Joseph McCaffrey - 2015 - Philosophical Psychology 28 (3):337-354.
    What are the vehicles of conceptual thought? Recently, cognitive scientists and philosophers of psychology have developed quite different theories about what kinds of representations concepts are. At one extreme, amodal theories claim that concepts are representations whose vehicles are distinct from those used in perceptual processes. At the other end of the spectrum, neo-empiricism proposes that concepts are perceptual representations grounded in the mind's sensory, motor, and affective systems. In this essay, I examine how evidence from the neuropsychological disorder semantic (...)
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  • The Representation of Abstract Words: Why Emotion Matters.Stavroula-Thaleia Kousta, Gabriella Vigliocco, David P. Vinson, Mark Andrews & Elena Del Campo - 2011 - Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 140 (1):14-34.
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  • Emotion Words, Regardless of Polarity, Have a Processing Advantage Over Neutral Words.Stavroula-Thaleia Kousta, David P. Vinson & Gabriella Vigliocco - 2009 - Cognition 112 (3):473-481.
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  • Perception of Motion Affects Language Processing.Michael P. Kaschak, Carol J. Madden, David J. Therriault, Richard H. Yaxley, Mark Aveyard, Adrienne A. Blanchard & Rolf A. Zwaan - 2005 - Cognition 94 (3):B79 - B89.
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  • Principles of Representation: Why You Can't Represent the Same Concept Twice.Louise Connell & Dermot Lynott - 2014 - Topics in Cognitive Science 6 (3):390-406.
    As embodied theories of cognition are increasingly formalized and tested, care must be taken to make informed assumptions regarding the nature of concepts and representations. In this study, we outline three reasons why one cannot, in effect, represent the same concept twice. First, online perception affects offline representation: Current representational content depends on how ongoing demands direct attention to modality-specific systems. Second, language is a fundamental facilitator of offline representation: Bootstrapping and shortcuts within the computationally cheaper linguistic system continuously modify (...)
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  • The Career of Metaphor.Brian F. Bowdle & Dedre Gentner - 2005 - Psychological Review 112 (1):193-216.
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  • Dual Coding Theory, Word Abstractness, and Emotion: A Critical Review of Kousta Et Al.Allan Paivio - 2013 - Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 142 (1):282-287.
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  • Thinking in Words: Language as an Embodied Medium of Thought.Guy Dove - 2014 - Topics in Cognitive Science 6 (3):371-389.
    Recently, there has been a great deal of interest in the idea that natural language enhances and extends our cognitive capabilities. Supporters of embodied cognition have been particularly interested in the way in which language may provide a solution to the problem of abstract concepts. Toward this end, some have emphasized the way in which language may act as form of cognitive scaffolding and others have emphasized the potential importance of language-based distributional information. This essay defends a version of the (...)
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  • Women, Fire, and Dangerous Things: What Categories Reveal About the Mind.George Lakoff - 1987 - Philosophy and Rhetoric 22 (4):299-302.
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  • Time in the Mind: Using Space to Think About Time.Daniel Casasanto & Lera Boroditsky - 2008 - Cognition 106 (2):579-593.
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  • The Neurobiology of Semantic Memory.Jeffrey R. Binder & Rutvik H. Desai - 2011 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 15 (11):527-536.
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  • Supersizing the Mind: Embodiment, Action, and Cognitive Extension.Andy Clark (ed.) - 2008 - Oxford University Press.
    Introduction : brainbound versus extended -- From embodiment to cognitive extension -- The active body -- The negotiable body -- Material symbols -- World, Incorporated -- Boundary disputes -- Mind re-bound -- The cure for cognitive hiccups (HEMC, HEC, HEMC ...) -- Rediscovering the brain -- The limits of embodiment -- Painting, planning, and perceiving -- Disentangling embodiment -- Conclusions : mind-sized bites.
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  • Furnishing the Mind: Concepts and Their Perceptual Basis.Jesse J. Prinz - 2002 - MIT Press.
    In Furnishing the Mind, Jesse Prinz attempts to swing the pendulum back toward empiricism.
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  • Metaphors We Live By.George Lakoff & Mark Johnson - 1980 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 40 (2):208-210.
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  • Grounded Cognition: Past, Present, and Future.Lawrence W. Barsalou - 2010 - Topics in Cognitive Science 2 (4):716-724.
    Thirty years ago, grounded cognition had roots in philosophy, perception, cognitive linguistics, psycholinguistics, cognitive psychology, and cognitive neuropsychology. During the next 20 years, grounded cognition continued developing in these areas, and it also took new forms in robotics, cognitive ecology, cognitive neuroscience, and developmental psychology. In the past 10 years, research on grounded cognition has grown rapidly, especially in cognitive neuroscience, social neuroscience, cognitive psychology, social psychology, and developmental psychology. Currently, grounded cognition appears to be achieving increased acceptance throughout cognitive (...)
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  • Metaphors We Live By.George Lakoff - 1980 - University of Chicago Press.
    The now-classic Metaphors We Live By changed our understanding of metaphor and its role in language and the mind. Metaphor, the authors explain, is a fundamental mechanism of mind, one that allows us to use what we know about our physical and social experience to provide understanding of countless other subjects. Because such metaphors structure our most basic understandings of our experience, they are "metaphors we live by"--metaphors that can shape our perceptions and actions without our ever noticing them. In (...)
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  • Words as Tools and the Problem of Abstract Words Meanings.Anna M. Borghi & Felice Cimatti - 2009 - In N. A. Taatgen & H. van Rijn (eds.), Proceedings of the 31st Annual Conference of the Cognitive Science Society. pp. 31--2304.
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  • Cortical Systems for Retrieval of Concrete Knowledge: The Convergence Zone Framework.Antonio R. Damasio & Hannah Damasio - 1994 - In Christof Koch & J. Davis (eds.), Large-Scale Neuronal Theories of the Brain. MIT Press. pp. 61--74.
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  • The Benefits of Sensorimotor Knowledge: Body-Object Interaction Facilitates Semantic Processing.Paul Siakaluk, Penny Pexman, Christopher Sears, Kim Wilson, Keri Locheed & William Owen - 2008 - Cognitive Science 32 (3):591-605.
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  • Perceptual Processing Affects Conceptual Processing.Saskia van Dantzig, Diane Pecher, Rene Zeelenberg & Lawrence Barsalou - 2008 - Cognitive Science 32 (3):579-590.
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  • Spatial and Linguistic Aspects of Visual Imagery in Sentence Comprehension.Benjamin Bergen, Shane Lindsay, Teenie Matlock & Srini Narayanan - 2007 - Cognitive Science 31 (5):733-764.
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  • Effects of Emotional Experience for Abstract Words in the Stroop Task.Paul D. Siakaluk, Nathan Knol & Penny M. Pexman - 2014 - Cognitive Science 38 (8):1698-1717.
    In this study, we examined the effects of emotional experience, a relatively new dimension of emotional knowledge that gauges the ease with which words evoke emotional experience, on abstract word processing in the Stroop task. In order to test the context-dependency of these effects, we accentuated the saliency of this dimension in Experiment 1A by blocking the stimuli such that one block consisted of the stimuli with the highest emotional experience ratings and the other block consisted of the stimuli with (...)
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  • Embodiment and Cognitive Science.Raymond W. Gibbs - 2006 - New York ;Cambridge University Press.
    This book explores how people's subjective, felt experiences of their bodies in action provide part of the fundamental grounding for human cognition and language. Cognition is what occurs when the body engages the physical and cultural world and must be studied in terms of the dynamical interactions between people and the environment. Human language and thought emerge from recurring patterns of embodied activity that constrain ongoing intelligent behavior. We must not assume cognition to be purely internal, symbolic, computational, and disembodied, (...)
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  • Philosophical Issues About Concepts.Joseph McCaffrey & Edouard Machery - 2012 - Wiley Interdisciplinary Reviews 3:265-279.
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