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  1. What We Owe to Each Other.Thomas Scanlon - 1998 - Belknap Press of Harvard University Press.
    In this book, T. M. Scanlon offers new answers to these questions, as they apply to the central part of morality that concerns what we owe to each other.
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  • Promising, Intimate Relationships, and Conventionalism.Seana Shiffrin - 2008 - Philosophical Review 117 (4):481-524.
    The power to promise is morally fundamental and does not, at its foundation, derive from moral principles that govern our use of conventions. Of course, many features of promising have conventional components—including which words, gestures, or conditions of silence create commitments. What is really at issue between conventionalists and nonconventionalists is whether the basic moral relation of promissory commitment derives from the moral principles that govern our use of social conventions. Other nonconventionalist accounts make problematic concessions to the conventionalist's core (...)
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  • Shared Agency and Contralateral Commitments.Abraham Sesshu Roth - 2004 - Philosophical Review 113 (3):359-410.
    My concern here is to motivate some theses in the philosophy of mind concerning the interpersonal character of intentions. I will do so by investigating aspects of shared agency. The main point will be that when acting together with others one must be able to act directly on the intention of another or others in a way that is relevantly similar to the manner in which an agent acts on his or her own intentions. What exactly this means will become (...)
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  • Shared Agency and Contralateral Commitments.Abraham Sesshu Roth - 2004 - Philosophical Review 113 (3):359-410.
    My concern here is to motivate some theses in the philosophy of mind concerning the interpersonal character of intentions. I will do so by investigating aspects of shared agency. The main point will be that when acting together with others one must be able to act directly on the intention of another or others in a way that is relevantly similar to the manner in which an agent acts on his or her own intentions. What exactly this means will become (...)
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  • Love as Valuing a Relationship.Niko Kolodny - 2003 - Philosophical Review 112 (2):135-189.
    At first glance, love seems to be a psychological state for which there are normative reasons: a state that, if all goes well, is an appropriate or fitting response to something independent of itself. Love for one’s parent, child, or friend is fitting, one wants to say, if anything is. On reflection, however, it is elusive what reasons for love might be. It is natural to assume that they would be nonrelational features of the person one loves, something about her (...)
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  • Love as Valuing a Relationship.Niko Kolodny - 2003 - Philosophical Review 112 (2):135-189.
    At first glance, love seems to be a psychological state for which there are normative reasons: a state that, if all goes well, is an appropriate or fitting response to something independent of itself. Love for one’s parent, child, or friend is fitting, one wants to say, if anything is. On reflection, however, it is elusive what reasons for love might be. It is natural to assume that they would be nonrelational features of the person one loves, something about her (...)
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  • Selflessness and Responsibility for Self: Is Deference Compatible with Autonomy?Andrea C. Westlund - 2003 - Philosophical Review 112 (4):483-523.
    She was intensely sympathetic. She was immensely charming. She excelled in the difficult arts of family life. She sacrificed herself daily. If there was chicken, she took the leg, if there was a draught, she sat in it—in short, she was so constituted that she never had a mind or wish of her own, but preferred to sympathise always with the minds and wishes of others. — Virginia Woolf (1979, 59).
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  • What to Do When You Don’T Know What to Do.Andrew Sepielli - 2009 - Oxford Studies in Metaethics 4:5-28.
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  • Epistemology of Disagreement: The Good News.David Christensen - 2007 - Philosophical Review 116 (2):187-217.
    How should one react when one has a belief, but knows that other people—who have roughly the same evidence as one has, and seem roughly as likely to react to it correctly—disagree? This paper argues that the disagreement of other competent inquirers often requires one to be much less confident in one’s opinions than one would otherwise be.
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  • Care and Commitment: Taking the Personal Point of View.Jeffrey Blustein - 1991 - Oup Usa.
    Despite the current popularity of what is commonly referred to as an `ethics of care', no one has yet undertaken a systematic philosophical study of `care' itself. In this book, Jeffrey Blustein presents the first such study, offering a detailed exploration of human `care' in its various guises: concern for and commitment to individuals, ideals, and causes. Blustein focuses on the nature and value of personal integrity and intimacy, and on the questions they raise for traditional moral theory.
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  • Contract as Promise: A Theory of Contractual Obligation.Charles Fried - 2015 - Oxford University Press USA.
    Contract as Promise is a study of the philosophical foundations of contract law in which Professor Fried effectively answers some of the most common assumptions about contract law and strongly proposes a moral basis for it while defending the classical theory of contract. This book provides two purposes regarding the complex legal institution of the contract. The first is the theoretical purpose to demonstrate how contract law can be traced to and is determined by a small number of basic moral (...)
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  • [On Plato, Meno 5. By C.W.F.A. Wolf. In Lat. Progr., Halle].Christian Wilhelm Friedrich A. Wolf - 1795
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  • Reflection and Disagreement.Adam Elga - 2007 - Noûs 41 (3):478–502.
    How should you take into account the opinions of an advisor? When you completely defer to the advisor's judgment, then you should treat the advisor as a guru. Roughly, that means you should believe what you expect she would believe, if supplied with your extra evidence. When the advisor is your own future self, the resulting principle amounts to a version of the Reflection Principle---a version amended to handle cases of information loss. When you count an advisor as an epistemic (...)
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  • Morality Unbounded.Barbara Herman - 2008 - Philosophy and Public Affairs 36 (4):323-358.
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  • Relationships and Responsibilities.Samuel Scheffler - 1997 - Philosophy and Public Affairs 26 (3):189-209.
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  • Friendship.Laurence Thomas - 1987 - Synthese 72 (2):217 - 236.
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  • Moral Principles and Political Obligations.A. John Simmons - 1979 - Princeton University Press.
    Every political theorist will need this book . . . . It is more 'important' than 90% of the work published in philosophy."--Joel Feinberg, University of Arizona.
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  • The Morality of Freedom.Joseph Raz - 1986 - Oxford University Press.
    Ranging over central issues of morals and politics and the nature of freedom and authority, this study examines the role of value-neutrality, rights, equality, ...
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  • The Ethics of Deference: Learning From Law's Morals.Philip Soper (ed.) - 2002 - Cambridge University Press.
    Do citizens have an obligation to obey the law? This book differs from standard approaches by shifting from the language of obedience to that of deference. The popular view that law claims authority but does not have it is here reversed on both counts: law does not claim authority but has it. Though the focus is on political obligation, the author approaches that issue indirectly by first developing a more general account of when deference is due to the view of (...)
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  • Justice as Fairness: A Restatement.John Rawls (ed.) - 2001 - Harvard University Press.
    This book originated as lectures for a course on political philosophy that Rawls taught regularly at Harvard in the 1980s.
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  • Value in Ethics and Economics.Elizabeth Anderson - 1993 - Harvard University Press.
    Women as commercial baby factories, nature as an economic resource, life as one big shopping mall: This is what we get when we use the market as a common ...
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  • The Morals of Modernity.Charles Larmore - 1996 - Cambridge University Press.
    The essays collected in this volume all explore the problem of the relation between moral philosophy and modernity. Charles Larmore addresses this problem by attempting to define the way distinctive forms of modern experience should orientate our moral thinking. Charles Larmore wonders whether the dominant forms of modern philosophy have not become blind to important dimensions of the moral life. The book argues against recent attempts to return to the virtue-centered perspective of ancient Greek ethics. As well as exploring the (...)
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  • What Are Friends For?: Feminist Perspectives on Personal Relationships and Moral Theory.Marilyn Friedman - 1993 - Cornell University Press.
    A contribution to the feminist discussion on moral theory, exploring the debate between moral impartiality and the partiality that characterizes personal relationships, the ethic of care and its relation to justice in a gender asymmetrical society, and the role of intimate friendship in an era of the dissolution of both extended and nuclear families.
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  • Necessity, Volition, and Love.Harry G. Frankfurt - 1998 - Cambridge University Press.
    One of the most influential of contemporary philosophers, Harry Frankfurt has made major contributions to the philosophy of action, moral psychology, and the study of Descartes. This collection of essays complements an earlier collection published by Cambridge, The Importance of What We Care About. Some of the essays develop lines of thought found in the earlier volume. They deal in general with foundational metaphysical and epistemological issues concerning Descartes, moral philosophy, and philosophical anthropology. Some bear upon topics in political philosophy (...)
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  • Trust and Antitrust.Annette Baier - 1986 - Ethics 96 (2):231-260.
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  • Friendship and Moral Danger.Dean Cocking & Jeanette Kennett - 2000 - Journal of Philosophy 97 (5):278-296.
    We focus here on some familiar kinds of cases of conflict between friendship and morality, and, on the basis of our account of the nature of friendship, argue for the following two claims: first, that in some cases where we are led morally astray by virtue of a relationship that makes its own demands on us, the relationship in question is properly called a friendship; second, that relationships of this kind are valuable in their own right.
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  • Friendship and the Self.Dean Cocking & Jeanette Kennett - 1998 - Ethics 108 (3):502-527.
    We argue that companion friendship is not importantly marked by self-disclosure as understood in either of these two ways. One's close friends need not be markedly similar to oneself, as is claimed by the mirror account, nor is the role of private information in establishing and maintaining intimacy important in the way claimed by the secrets view. Our claim will be that the mirror and secrets views not only fail to identify features that are in part constitutive of close or (...)
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  • What We Owe to Each Other.Thomas Scanlon - 2002 - Mind 111 (442):323-354.
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  • Moral Thinking: Its Levels, Method and Point.David Zimmerman - 1984 - Philosophical Review 93 (2):293.
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  • Moral Principles and Political Obligations.Diana T. Meyers - 1981 - Philosophical Review 90 (3):472.
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  • Value in Ethics and Economics.Paul Seabright - 1995 - Philosophical Review 104 (2):303.
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  • Care and Commitment: Taking the Personal Point of View.Rita C. Manning & Jeffrey Blustein - 1993 - Philosophical Review 102 (4):620.
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  • The Epistemic Significance of Disagreement.Thomas Kelly - 2005 - In John Hawthorne & Tamar Gendler (eds.), Oxford Studies in Epistemology, Volume 1. Oxford University Press. pp. 167-196.
    Looking back on it, it seems almost incredible that so many equally educated, equally sincere compatriots and contemporaries, all drawing from the same limited stock of evidence, should have reached so many totally different conclusions---and always with complete certainty.
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  • Moral Saints.Susan Wolf - 1982 - Journal of Philosophy 79 (8):419-439.
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  • Friendship and Moral Danger.Dean Cocking & Jeanette Kennett - 2000 - Journal of Philosophy 97 (5):278.
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  • Love as a Moral Emotion.J. David Velleman - 1999 - Ethics 109 (2):338-374.
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  • Necessity, Volition, and Love.Harry G. Frankfurt - 2001 - Philosophical Quarterly 51 (202):114-116.
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  • Trust as an Affective Attitude.Karen Jones - 1996 - Ethics 107 (1):4-25.
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  • Justice as Fairness: A Restatement.C. L. Ten - 2003 - Mind 112 (447):563-566.
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  • Epistemic Partiality in Friendship.Sarah Stroud - 2006 - Ethics 116 (3):498-524.
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  • The Morals of Modernity.Gerald Gaus - 1996 - Philosophical and Phenomenological Research 60 (1):228-231.
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  • Value in Ethics and Economics.[author unknown] - 1996 - Erkenntnis 45 (1):133-136.
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  • Value in Ethics and Economics.David Schmidtz - 1993 - Ethics 105 (3):662-663.
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  • Against Beneficence: A Normative Account of Love.Kyla Ebels‐Duggan - 2008 - Ethics 119 (1):142-170.
    I argue that rather than aiming at the well-being of those whom we love, we should aim to share in their ends. The former stance runs the risk of being objectionably paternalistic and, as I explain, only the latter makes reciprocal relationships possible. I end by diagnosing our attraction to the idea that we should promote our loved-ones’ well-being.
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  • Authority.Scott Shapiro - 2002 - In Jules Coleman & Scott J. Shapiro (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Jurisprudence & Philosophy of Law. Oxford University Press.
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  • Creating the Kingdom of Ends: Reciprocity and Responsibility in Personal Relations.Christine M. Korsgaard - 1992 - Philosophical Perspectives 6:305-332.
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  • Liberating Duties.Joseph Raz - 1989 - Law and Philosophy 8 (1):3 - 21.
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  • The Two Principles of Roman Catholic Church-State Relations.Thomas T. Love - 1965 - Ethics 76 (1):57-61.
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  • The Morality of Freedom.Joseph Raz - 1988 - Ethics 98 (4):850-852.
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  • The Morality of Freedom.Joseph Raz - 1986 - Philosophy 63 (243):119-122.
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