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  1. Commentary on Mitsis.Gisela Striker - 1988 - Proceedings of the Boston Area Colloquium of Ancient Philosophy 4 (1):323-354.
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  • Epicurus on Pleasure and the Complete Life.Stephen E. Rosenbaum - 1990 - The Monist 73 (1):21-41.
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  • How to Be Dead and Not Care: A Defense of Epicurus.Stephen E. Rosenbaum - 1986 - American Philosophical Quarterly 23 (2):217 - 225.
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  • Some Puzzles About the Evil of Death.Fred Feldman - 1991 - Philosophical Review 100 (2):205-227.
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  • When is Death Bad for the One Who Dies?Ben Bradley - 2004 - Noûs 38 (1):1–28.
    Epicurus seems to have thought that death is not bad for the one who dies, since its badness cannot be located in time. I show that Epicurus’ argument presupposes Presentism, and I argue that death is bad for its victim at all and only those times when the person would have been living a life worth living had she not died when she did. I argue that my account is superior to competing accounts given by Thomas Nagel, Fred Feldman and (...)
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  • Death.Thomas Nagel - 1970 - Noûs 4 (1):73-80.
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  • Happiness and Death in Epicurean Ethics.Phillip Mitsis - 2002 - Apeiron 35 (4):41-56.
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  • Epicurus on Sex, Marriage, and Children.Tad Brennan - 1996 - Classical Philology 91:346-52.
    Epicurus strongly discouraged sex, marriage, and the rearing of children. This paper looks at some of the primary evidence for these claims, clears up a translation of one passage, and emends another passage. (The emendation has been accepted into Dorandi's new edition of Diogenes Laertius).
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  • The Therapy of Desire: Theory and Practice in Hellenistic Ethics.Martha C. Nussbaum - 1996 - Zeitschrift für Philosophische Forschung 50 (4):646-650.
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  • Alienation, Consequentialism, and the Demands of Morality.Peter Railton - 1984 - Philosophy and Public Affairs 13 (2):134-171.
    The JSTOR Archive is a trusted digital repository providing for long-term preservation and access to leading academic journals and scholarly literature from around the world. The Archive is supported by libraries, scholarly societies, publishers, and foundations. It is an initiative of JSTOR, a not-for-profit organization with a mission to help the scholarly community take advantage of advances in technology. For more information regarding JSTOR, please contact support@jstor.org.
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  • Epicurus' Ethical Theory: The Pleasures of Invulnerability.Phillip Mitsis - 1991 - Ethics 101 (3):657-658.
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  • An Introduction to the Principles of Morals and Legislation.Jeremy Bentham, J. H. Burns & H. L. A. Hart - 1984 - Ethics 94 (2):355-356.
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  • Anarchy, State, and Utopia.Robert Nozick - 1977 - Philosophy 52 (199):102-105.
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  • Facing Death: Epicurus and His Critics.James Warren - 2006 - Philosophical Quarterly 56 (223):294-297.
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  • Partnership of Citizens and Metics: The Will of Epicurus.M. Leiwo & P. Remes - 1999 - Classical Quarterly 49 (01):161-166.
    The law of Athens prohibited any but full citizens from owning land or houses. Thus the law also impeded the bequeathing of real property to those who were not citizens. This law seemed to preclude those who were the real backbone of the trading and banking businesses from owning land and, therefore, from lending and borrowing by using it as a security.
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  • Annihilation.Steven Luper-Foy - 1987 - Philosophical Quarterly 37 (148):233-252.
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