Results for 'Lintott Sheila'

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  1. The Aesthetics and Ethics of Sexiness.Hans Maes - 2017 - In David Goldblatt, Stephanie Partridge & Lee Brown (eds.), Aesthetics: A Reader in Philosophy (4th ed.). London:
    All too often women are considered sexy in accordance with an externally dictated and unduly narrow conception of sexiness – one that excludes large portions of the female population from being considered sexy. In response to this, some feminists have suggested that we should give up on sexiness altogether. Since the agency, subjectivity, and autonomy of a woman being judged sexy is generally ignored, they argue, we have, in effect, an equation of sexiness with objecthood. In a recent essay entitled (...)
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  2. Falling in Lust: Sexiness, Feminism, and Pornography.Hans Maes - 2017 - In Mari Mikkola (ed.), Beyond Speech. Oxford:
    Caffeine makes you sexy! This absurd slogan can be seen in the shop windows of a popular Brussels coffee chain – its bold pink lettering indicating how they are mainly targeting female customers. It is one of the silliest examples of something that is both very common and very worrisome nowadays, namely, the constant call on women to look ‘hot’ and conform to the standards of sexiness as they are projected in the media, entertainment industry, and advertising. But what exactly (...)
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  3. Introduction: Feminism and Aesthetics.Peg Zeglin Brand Weiser & Mary Devereaux - 2003 - Hypatia 18 (4):ix-xx.
    This special issue of HYPATIA: A Journal of Feminist Philosophy we co-edited highlights the expanded range of topics at center stage in feminist philosophical inquiry to date (2003): recontextualizing women artists (essays by Patricia Locke, Eleanor Heartney, and Michelle Meagher), bodies and beauty (Ann J. Cahill, Sheila Lintott, Janell Hobson, Richard Shusterman, Joanna Frueh), art, ethics, politics, law (A. W. Eaton, Amy Mullin, L. Ryan Musgrave, Teresa Winterhalter, Joshua Shaw), and review essays by Estella Lauter and Flo Leibowitz.
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  4. “Knowing Things in Common”: Sheila Jasanoff and Helen Longino on the Social Nature of Knowledge.Jaana Eigi - 2013 - Acta Baltica Historiae Et Philosophiae Scientiarum 1 (2):26-37.
    In her analysis of the politics of biotechnology, Sheila Jasanoff argued that modern democracy cannot be understood without an analysis of the ways knowledge is created and used in society. She suggested calling these ways to “know things in common” civic epistemologies. Jasanoff thus approached knowledge as fundamentally social. The focus on the social nature of knowledge allows drawing parallels with some developments in philosophy of science. In the first part of the paper, I juxtapose Jasanoff’s account with the (...)
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  5. Maternity and Mortality in Homeric Poetry.Sheila Murnaghan - 1992 - Classical Antiquity 11 (2):242-264.
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    Les sans-papiers et leurs droits d'avoir des droits: une approche par l'éthique de la discussion.Speranta Dumitru & Insa Breyer - 2007 - Raisons Politiques 26 (2):125-147.
    The aim of this article is to show that refusing to legalize the status of undocumented immigrants who have been long-term residents is a serious violation of human rights. The "right to have rights" ­ a term coined by Hannah Arendt and developed by Sheila Benhabib ­ should be construed first and foremost as the right to a legal existence. We take issue with consequentialists who warn that legalizing the status of undocumented aliens will encourage further undesirable immigration, for (...)
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