Results for 'Maggie Redshaw'

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  1. Stillbirths: Economic and Psychosocial Consequences.Alexander E. P. Heazell, Dimitros Siassakos, Hannah Blencowe, Zulfiqar A. Bhutta, Joanne Cacciatore, Nghia Dang, Jai Das, Bicki Flenady, Katherine J. Gold, Olivia K. Mensah, Joseph Millum, Daniel Nuzum, Keelin O'Donoghue, Maggie Redshaw, Arjumand Rizvi, Tracy Roberts, Toyin Saraki, Claire Storey, Aleena M. Wojcieszek & Soo Downe - 2016 - The Lancet 387 (10018):604-16.
    Despite the frequency of stillbirths, the subsequent implications are overlooked and underappreciated. We present findings from comprehensive, systematic literature reviews, and new analyses of published and unpublished data, to establish the effect of stillbirth on parents, families, health-care providers, and societies worldwide. Data for direct costs of this event are sparse but suggest that a stillbirth needs more resources than a livebirth, both in the perinatal period and in additional surveillance during subsequent pregnancies. Indirect and intangible costs of stillbirth are (...)
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  2. Hypocrisy in Politics.Maggie O’Brien & Alexandra Whelan - 2022 - Ergo: An Open Access Journal of Philosophy 9 (63):1692-1714.
    The charge of hypocrisy is a peculiar kind of accusation: it is damning and ubiquitous; it is used to deny the hypocrite standing to speak; and it is levelled against a great variety of conduct. Much of the philosophical literature on hypocrisy is aimed at explaining why hypocrisy is wrongful and worthy of censure. We focus instead on the use of the accusation of hypocrisy and argue for a revisionary claim. People think that hypocrisy in politics is bad and that (...)
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  3. The Underrepresentation of Women in Prestigious Ethics Journals.Meena Krishnamurthy, Shen-yi Liao, Monique Deveaux & Maggie Dalecki - 2017 - Hypatia 32 (4):928-939.
    It has been widely reported that women are underrepresented in academic philosophy as faculty and students. This article investigates whether this representation may also occur in the domain of journal article publishing. Our study looked at whether women authors were underrepresented as authors in elite ethics journals — Ethics, Philosophy & Public Affairs, the Journal of Political Philosophy, and the Journal of Moral Philosophy — between 2004-2014, relative to the proportion of women employed in academic ethics (broadly construed). We found (...)
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  4. Maggie Mort, Building the Trident Network: A Study of the Enrollment of People, Knowledge, and Machines. Inside Technology. Cambridge, MA and London: MIT Press, 2002. Pp. X+217. Isbn 0-262-13397-0. £22.50. [REVIEW]Sean F. Johnston - 2004 - British Journal for the History of Science 37 (4):485-486.
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  5. Review of Postdigital Theologies: Technology, Belief, and Practice, Maggi Savin-Baden, and John Reader (eds), Springer, 2022. [REVIEW]Ryan Haecker - unknown - Reviews in Religion and Theology 30 (3):197-200.
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  6. Character, Corruption, and ‘Cultures of Speed’ in Higher Education.Ian Kidd - 2022 - In Ainé Mahon (ed.), Philosophical Perspectives on the Contemporary University: In Shadows and Light. Springer. pp. 17-28.
    This chapter offers a character-based criticism of ‘the culture of speed’ condemned by the Canadian literary scholars, Maggie Berg and Barbara Seeber in their influential polemic, The Slow Professor. Central to their criticisms of speed and praise of slowness are, I argue, substantive concerns about their effects on moral and intellectual character. I argue that a full reckoning of the wrongs of academic cultures of speed must include appreciation of the ways they promote a host of accelerative vices and (...)
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  7. Corrupted Temporalities, ‘Cultures of Speed’, and the Possibility of Collegiality.Ian James Kidd - 2023 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 55 (3):330-342.
    This paper describes a neglected aspect of the critique of academic ‘cultures of speed’ offered by Maggie Berg and Barbara Seeber in The Slow Professor. I argue internalisation of the values and imperatives of cultures of speed can encourage the erosion of a range of academic virtues while also facilitating the development of a range of academic vices. I focus on the ways that an internalised ‘psychology of speed’ erodes our capacity to exercise the virtues of intellectual beneficence – (...)
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