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  1. added 2020-05-11
    L Dumont, 'From Mandeville to Marx'. [REVIEW]Sergio Volodia Marcello Cremaschi - 1980 - Rivista Internazionale di Scienze Sociali 89 (2):743-748.
    Alongside the aspects of interest in the history of ideas in general, this text is of great interest to the economist and the philosopher of economics. The parts on Smith and Marx are a demonstration of how it is possible to make a history of scientific thought that explains the incongruities of the history of thought in front of which Schumpeter stops: these incongruities cease to be mysterious, and indeed they acquire full meaning if we accept the idea of considering (...)
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  2. added 2019-08-06
    Il commercio, le passioni, la virtù. Discussioni su etica ed economia fra Seicento e Settecento.Sergio Volodia Marcello Cremaschi - 1993 - In Mauro Magatti (ed.), La porta stretta. Etica ed economia negli anni '90. Milan, Italy: Franco Angeli. pp. 33-60.
    The chapter reconstructs the eighteenth-century discussion on commerce and virtue in the light of Hirschman's, Pocock's, Polanyi's, and Viner's interpretations of that discussion. The claims put forth are: the history of the emerging of modern market society has been heavily conditioned by a teleological and deterministic interpretation of history; the eighteenth-century discussion cannot be read neither in terms of ideologies nor in terms of the history of economic analysis; a 'strategic' reading is fruitful in so far as it allows two-ways (...)
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  3. added 2019-07-26
    On Pride.Lorenzo Greco - 2019 - Humana Mente 12 (35):101-123.
    In this essay, I offer a vindication of pride. I start by presenting the Christian condemnation of pride as the cardinal sin. I subsequently examine Mandeville’s line of argument whereby pride is beneficial to society, although remaining a vice for the individual. Finally, I focus on, and endorse, the analysis of pride formulated by Hume, for whom pride qualifies instead as a virtue. This is because pride not only contributes to making society flourish but also stabilizes the virtuous agent by (...)
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  4. added 2018-11-22
    Bernard Mandeville on Honor, Hypocrisy, and War.Peter Olsthoorn - 2019 - Heythrop Journal 60 (2):205-218.
    Authors from Cicero to Smith held honor to be indispensable to make people see and do what is right. As they considered honor to be a social motive, they did not think this dependence on honor was a problem. Today, we tend to see honor as a self‐regarding motive, but do not see this as problematic because we stopped seeing it as a necessary incentive. Bernard Mandeville, however, agreed with the older authors that honor is indispensable, but agreed with us (...)
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  5. added 2018-06-16
    Honor in Political and Moral Philosophy.Peter Olsthoorn - 2015 - State University of New York Press.
    In this history of the development of ideas of honor in Western philosophy, Peter Olsthoorn examines what honor is, how its meaning has changed, and whether it can still be of use. Political and moral philosophers from Cicero to John Stuart Mill thought that a sense of honor and concern for our reputation could help us to determine the proper thing to do, and just as important, provide us with the much-needed motive to do it. Today, outside of the military (...)
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  6. added 2014-01-28
    Honour, Face and Reputation in Political Theory.Peter Olsthoorn - 2008 - European Journal of Political Theory 7 (4):472-491.
    Until fairly recently it was not uncommon for political theorists to hold the view that people cannot be expected to act in accordance with the public interest without some incentive. Authors such as Marcus Tullius Cicero, John Locke, David Hume and Adam Smith, for instance, held that people often act in accordance with the public interest, but more from a concern for their honour and reputation than from a concern for the greater good. Today, most authors take a more demanding (...)
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  7. added 2012-10-23
    Bernard Mandeville.Alex Voorhoeve - 2002 - The Philosophers' Magazine 20:53.
    A short account of the philosopher Bernard Mandeville's key ideas.
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  8. added 2012-02-11
    Book Review:The Fable of the Bees. Bernard Mandeville, F. B. Kaye. [REVIEW]C. M. Perry - 1926 - Ethics 36 (4):431-.
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