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  1. added 2019-04-30
    Early Modern Accounts of Epicureanism.Stewart Duncan & Antonia LoLordo - forthcoming - In Jacob Klein & Nathan Powers (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Hellenistic Philosophy. Oxford University Press.
    We look at some interesting and important episodes in the life of early modern Epicureanism, focusing on natural philosophy. We begin with two early moderns who had a great deal to say about ancient Epicureanism: Pierre Gassendi and Ralph Cudworth. Looking at how Gassendi and Cudworth conceived of Epicureanism gives us a sense of what the early moderns considered important in the ancient tradition. It also points us towards three main themes of early modern Epicureanism in natural philosophy, which we (...)
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  2. added 2019-04-30
    Henry More’s “Spirit of Nature” and Newton’s Aether.Jacques Joseph - 2016 - Teorie Vědy / Theory of Science 38 (3):337-358.
    The paper presents the notion of “Spirit of Nature” in Henry More and describes its position within More’s philosophical system. Through a thorough analysis, it tries to show in what respects it can be considered a scientific object and in what respects it cannot. In the second part of this paper, More’s “Spirit of Nature” is compared to Newton’s various attempts at presenting a metaphysical cause of the force of gravity, using the similarities between the two to see this notorious (...)
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  3. added 2019-04-30
    Vitalistic Approaches to Life in Early Modern England.Veronika Szanto - 2015 - Teorie Vědy / Theory of Science 37 (2):209-230.
    Vitalism has been given different definitions and diverse figures have been labelled as vitalists throughout the history of ideas. Concentrating on the seventeenth century, we find that scholars identify as vitalists authors who endorse notions that are in diametrical opposition with each other. I briefly present the ideas of dualist vitalists and monist vitalists and the philosophical and theological considerations informing their thought. In all these varied forms of vitalism the identifiable common motives are the essential irreducibility of life and (...)
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  4. added 2018-12-27
    Species and the Good in Anne Conway's Metaethics.John R. T. Grey - forthcoming - In Colin Marshall (ed.), Comparative Metaethics: Neglected Perspectives on the Foundations of Morality. New York: Routledge.
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  5. added 2018-12-27
    Conway and Charleton on the Intimate Presence of Souls in Bodies.Jacqueline Broad - 2018 - Journal of the History of Ideas 79 (4):571-591.
    Little is known about the shaping and development of Anne Conway’s thought in relation to her early modern contemporaries. In one part of her only surviving treatise, The Principles, Conway criticises “those doctors” who uphold a dualist theory of soul and body, a mechanist conception of body (as dead and inert), and the view that the soul is “intimate present” in the body. In this paper, I argue that here she targets Walter Charleton, a well-known defender of Epicurean atomism in (...)
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  6. added 2018-08-27
    DIDEROT AND MATERIALIST THEORIES OF THE SELF.Charles T. Wolfe - 2015 - Journal of Society and Politics 9 (1).
    The concept of self has preeminently been asserted (in its many versions) as a core component of anti-reductionist, antinaturalistic philosophical positions, from Descartes to Husserl and beyond, with the exception of some hybrid or intermediate positions which declare rather glibly that, since we are biological entities which fully belong to the natural world, and we are conscious of ourselves as 'selves', therefore the self belongs to the natural world (this is characteristic e.g. of embodied phenomenology and enactivism). Nevertheless, from Cudworth (...)
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  7. added 2018-07-31
    On the type of philosophical thought of John Smith: a lecture on "excellence of true religion · nobility.三上 章 - unknown - Humanities and Social Sciences 31:1 - 28.
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  8. added 2018-07-31
    John Smith and Platonism in A Discourse Concerning the True Way or Method of Attaining to Divine Knowledge.Akira Mikami - 2013 - Toyo Eiwa Graduate School Bulletin 9:1-19.
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  9. added 2018-07-12
    Isaac Newton (1642–1727).Zvi Biener - 2017 - Routledge Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    Isaac Newton is best known as a mathematician and physicist. He invented the calculus, discovered universal gravitation and made significant advances in theoretical and experimental optics. His master-work on gravitation, the Principia, is often hailed as the crowning achievement of the scientific revolution. His significance for philosophers, however, extends beyond the philosophical implications of his scientific discoveries. Newton was an able and subtle philosopher, working at a time when science was not yet recognized as an activity distinct from philosophy. He (...)
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  10. added 2018-02-19
    Sympathetic Action in the Seventeenth Century: Human and Natural.Chris Meyns - 2018 - Philosophical Explorations (1):1-16.
    The category of sympathy marks a number of basic divisions in early modern approaches to action explanations, whether for human agency or for change in the wider natural world. Some authors were critical of using sympathy to explain change. They call such principles “unintelligible” or assume they involve “mysterious” action at a distance. Others, including Margaret Cavendish, Anne Conway, and Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz, appeal to sympathy to capture natural phenomena, or to supply a backbone to their metaphysics. Here I discuss (...)
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  11. added 2018-02-19
    Philosophical Religions From Plato to Spinoza, Carlos Fraenkel, Cambridge University Press, 2012. [REVIEW]Derek Michaud - 2015 - Reviews in Religion and Theology 22 (3):233-235.
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  12. added 2018-02-17
    Margaret Cavendish and Joseph Glanvill: Science, Religion, and Witchcraft.Jacqueline Broad - 2007 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 38 (3):493-505.
    Many scholars point to the close association between early modern science and the rise of rational arguments in favour of the existence of witches. For some commentators, it is a poor reflection on science that its methods so easily lent themselves to the unjust persecution of innocent men and women. In this paper, I examine a debate about witches between a woman philosopher, Margaret Cavendish , and a fellow of the Royal Society, Joseph Glanvill . I argue that Cavendish is (...)
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  13. added 2017-03-08
    “Reason Turned Into Sense”: John Smith on Spiritual Sensation.Derek Michaud - 2017 - Leuven: Peeters.
    John Smith (1618-1652), long known for the elegance of his prose and the breadth of his erudition, has been underappreciated as a philosophical theologian. This book redresses this by showing how the spiritual senses became an essential tool for responding to early modern developments in philosophy, science, and religion for Smith. Through a close reading of the Select Discourses (1660) it is shown how Smith’s theories of theological knowledge, method, and prophecy as well as his prescriptive account of Christian piety (...)
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  14. added 2016-09-06
    Eternity in Early Modern Philosophy.Yitzhak Melamed - 2016 - In Yitzhak Y. Melamed (ed.), Eternity: A History. Oxford University Press. pp. 129-167.
    Modernity seemed to be the autumn of eternity. The secularization of European culture provided little sustenance to the concept of eternity with its heavy theological baggage. Yet, our hero would not leave the stage without an outstanding performance of its power and temptation. Indeed, in the first three centuries of the modern period – the subject of the third chapter by Yitzhak Melamed - the concept of eternity will play a crucial role in the great philosophical systems of the period. (...)
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  15. added 2016-09-06
    Henry More : Plaidoyer Pour Un Espace Infini Et Divin.Francoise Monnoyeur - 1995 - In Infini des Philosophes, Infini des Astronomes. Belin. pp. 77-92.
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  16. added 2016-05-13
    Materialism and the Activity of Matter in Seventeenth‐Century European Philosophy.Stewart Duncan - 2016 - Philosophy Compass 11 (11):671-680.
    Early modern debates about the nature of matter interacted with debates about whether matter could think. In particular, some philosophers (e.g., Cudworth and Leibniz) objected to materialism about the human mind on the grounds that matter is passive, thinking things are active, and one cannot make an active thing out of passive material. This paper begins by looking at two seventeenth-century materialist views (Hobbes’s, and one suggested but not endorsed by Locke) before considering that objection (which I call here the (...)
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  17. added 2016-05-13
    Adversaries or Allies? Occasional Thoughts on the Masham-Astell Exchange.Jacqueline Broad - 2003 - Eighteenth-Century Thought 1:123-49.
    Against the backdrop of the English reception of Locke’s Essay, stands a little-known philosophical dispute between two seventeenth-century women writers: Mary Astell (1666-1731) and Damaris Cudworth Masham (1659-1708). On the basis of their brief but heated exchange, Astell and Masham are typically regarded as philosophical adversaries: Astell a disciple of the occasionalist John Norris, and Masham a devout Lockean. In this paper, I argue that although there are many respects in which Astell and Masham are radically opposed, the two women (...)
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  18. added 2016-03-07
    Varieties of Spiritual Sense: Cusanus and John Smith.Derek Michaud - manuscript
    SAMPLE DRAFT - Not for citation or quotation. Chapter in Nicholas of Cusa in Early Modern Reform, Joshua Hollmann, Eric Parker and Simon Burton, eds. Brill. Forthcoming.
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  19. added 2016-03-07
    The Legacy of a ‘Living Library’: On the Reception of John Smith.Derek Michaud - manuscript
    DRAFT - Not for citation or quotation. Chapter in Revisioning Cambridge Platonism, Douglas Hedley, Sarah Hutton, and David Leech, eds. The International Archives of the History of Ideas. Springer. 2019.
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  20. added 2015-04-27
    Knowledge and Suffering in Early Modern Philosophy: G.W. Leibniz and Anne Conway.Christia Mercer - 2012 - In Sabrina Ebbersmeyer (ed.), Emotional Minds. De Gruyter. pp. 179.
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  21. added 2015-03-03
    Partes extra partes. Étendue et impénétrabilité dans la correspondance entre Descartes et More.Jean-Pascal Anfray - 2014 - Les Etudes Philosophiques 108 (1):37.
    The relation between extension and impenetrability is a major issue in the Descartes-More correspondence, which implies an analysis of the concept of extension. The mereological structure partes extra partes is a crucial element here. Both philosophers hold two opposed views of this mereological structure. I try to show that these two views can be traced back to scholastic discussions on quantity’s relation to extension. This background provides a vantage point, which enables to propose a new construal of the argumentative exchange (...)
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  22. added 2014-07-25
    Axiarchism and Selectors.John Russell Roberts - 2014 - Faith and Philosophy 31 (4):412-421.
    This essay offers a defense of Axiarchism's answer to the question, "Why does the world exit?" against prominent objections leveled against it by Derek Parfit. Parfit rejects the Axiarchist answer while abstracting from it his own Selector strategy. I argue that the abstraction fails, and that even if we were to regard Axiarchism as an instance of a Selector hypothesis, we should regard it as the only viable one. I also argue that Parfit's abstraction leads him to mistake the nature (...)
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  23. added 2014-04-22
    The Passions and Self-Esteem in Mary Astell's Early Feminist Prose.Kathleen Ann Ahearn - unknown
    This dissertation examines the influence of Cambridge Platonism and materialist philosophy on Mary Astell's early feminism. More specifically, I argue that Astell co-opts Descartes's theory of regulating the passions in his final publication, The Passions of the Soul, to articulate a comprehensive, Enlightenment and body friendly theory of feminine self-esteem that renders her feminism modern. My analysis of Astell's theory of feminine self-esteem follows both textual and contextual cues, thus allowing for a reorientation of her early feminism vis-a-vis contemporary feminist (...)
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  24. added 2014-04-01
    Über den Zusammenhang zwischen plastic natures, spirit of nature und dem Naturgesetzbegriff bei Cudworth und More.Andreas Hüttemann - 2001 - In Kausalität und Naturgesetz in der frühen Neuzeit. Steiner. pp. 139-154.
    The paper discusses Cudworth's plastice natures and More's spirit of nature in the context of different 17th century conceptions of laws of nature.
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  25. added 2014-03-17
    Ralph Cudworth, A Treatise Concerning Eternal and Immutable Morality, With a Treatise of Freewill Reviewed By.Jennifer Nagel - 1998 - Philosophy in Review 18 (1):19-21.
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  26. added 2014-03-11
    Platonism in Early Modern Natural Philosophy: The Case of Leibniz and Conway.Christia Mercer - 2012 - In Christoph Horn James Wilberding (ed.), Neoplatonic Natural Philosophy. Oxford University Press.
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  27. added 2014-03-11
    Spiritual Presence and Dimensional Space Beyond the Cosmos.Hylarie Kochiras - 2012 - Intellectual History Review 22 (1):41-68.
    This paper examines connections between concepts of space and extension on the one hand and immaterial spirits on the other, specifically the immanentist concept of spirits as present in rerum natura. Those holding an immanentist concept, such as Thomas Aquinas, typically understood spirits non-dimensionally as present by essence and power; and that concept was historically linked to holenmerism, the doctrine that the spirit is whole in every part. Yet as Aristotelian ideas about extension were challenged and an actual, infinite, dimensional (...)
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  28. added 2014-03-03
    Higher Reason and Lower Reason.John S. Uebersax - manuscript
    The word 'reason' as used today is used ambiguous in its meaning. It may denote either of two mental faculties: a lower reason associated with discursive, linear thinking, and a higher reason associated with direct apprehension of first principles of mathematics and logic, and possibly also of moral and religious truths. These two faculties may be provisionally named Reason (higher reason) and rationality (lower reason). Common language and personal experience supply evidence of these being distinct faculties. So does classical philosophical (...)
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  29. added 2014-03-03
    Newton’s Neo-Platonic Ontology of Space.Edward Slowik - 2013 - Foundations of Science 18 (3):419-448.
    This paper investigates Newton’s ontology of space in order to determine its commitment, if any, to both Cambridge neo-Platonism, which posits an incorporeal basis for space, and substantivalism, which regards space as a form of substance or entity. A non-substantivalist interpretation of Newton’s theory has been famously championed by Howard Stein and Robert DiSalle, among others, while both Stein and the early work of J. E. McGuire have downplayed the influence of Cambridge neo-Platonism on various aspects of Newton’s own spatial (...)
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  30. added 2014-03-03
    The Patristic Roots of John Smith’s True Way or Method of Attaining to Divine Knowledge.Derek Michaud - 2011 - In Thomas Cattoi & June McDaniel (eds.), Perceiving the Divine through the Human Body: Mystical Sensuality. Palgrave-Macmillan.
    The literature on the Cambridge Platonists abounds with references to Neoplatonism and the Alexandrian Fathers on general themes of philosophical and theological methodology. The specific theme of the spiritual senses of the soul has received scant attention however, to the detriment of our understanding of their place in this important tradition of Christian speculation. Thus, while much attention has been paid to the clear influence of Plotinus and the Florentine Academy, far less has been given to important theological figures that (...)
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  31. added 2012-02-09
    Whichcote and the Cambridge Platonists on Human Nature: An Interpretation and Defense.John Russell Roberts - 2012 - Oxford Studies in Early Modern Philosophy VI.
    Draft version of essay. ABSTRACT: Benjamin Whichcote developed a distinctive account of human nature centered on our moral psychology. He believed that this view of human nature, which forms the foundation of “Cambridge Platonism,” showed that the demands of reason and faith are not merely compatible but dynamically supportive of one another. I develop an interpretation of this oft-neglected and widely misunderstood account of human nature and defend its viability against a key objection.
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  32. added 2012-02-09
    Debating Materialism: Cavendish, Hobbes, and More.Stewart Duncan - 2012 - History of Philosophy Quarterly 29 (4):391-409.
    This paper discusses the materialist views of Margaret Cavendish, focusing on the relationships between her views and those of two of her contemporaries, Thomas Hobbes and Henry More. It argues for two main claims. First, Cavendish's views sit, often rather neatly, between those of Hobbes and More. She agreed with Hobbes on some issues and More on others, while carving out a distinctive alternative view. Secondly, the exchange between Hobbes, More, and Cavendish illustrates a more general puzzle about just what (...)
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