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  1. Critica inteligenței emoționale în organizații.Nicolae Sfetcu - manuscript
    Se consideră conceptul de inteligență emoțională ca fiind invalid, atât pentru că nu este o formă de inteligență, cât și pentru că este definit atât de larg și incluziv încât nu are un sens inteligibil. Extinderea termenului de „inteligență” distorsionează sensul conceptului. Motivul final ar fi egalitarismul, astfel încât toată lumea să fie considerată egală în inteligență. Iinteligența emoțională nu ar fi, în fapt, o altă formă sau tip de inteligență, ci inteligența (capacitatea de a înțelege abstracțiunile) aplicată unui anumit (...)
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  2. Exploitation and the Desirability of Unenforced Law.Robert C. Hughes - forthcoming - Business Ethics Quarterly:1-23.
    Many business transactions and employment contracts are wrongfully exploitative despite being consensual and beneficial to both parties, compared with a nontransaction baseline. This form of exploitation can present governments with a dilemma. Legally permitting exploitation may send the message that the public condones it. In some economic conditions, coercively enforced antiexploitation law may harm the people it is intended to help. Under these conditions, a way out of the dilemma is to enact laws with provisions that lack coercive enforcement. Noncoercive (...)
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  3. When Should the Master Answer? Respondeat Superior and the Criminal Law.Kenneth Silver - forthcoming - Criminal Law and Philosophy:1-20.
    Respondeat superior is a legal doctrine conferring liability from one party onto another because the latter stands in some relationship of authority over the former. Though originally a doctrine of tort law, for the past century it has been used within the criminal law, especially to the end of securing criminal liability for corporations. Here, I argue that on at least one prominent conception of criminal responsibility, we are not justified in using this doctrine in this way. Firms are not (...)
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  4. Excusing Corporate Wrongdoing and the State of Nature.Kenneth Silver & Paul Garofalo - forthcoming - Academy of Management Review.
    Most business ethicists maintain that corporate actors are subject to a variety of moral obligations. However, there is a persistent and underappreciated concern that the competitive pressures of the market somehow provide corporate actors with a far-reaching excuse from meeting these obligations. Here, we assess this concern. Blending resources from the history of philosophy and strategic management, we demonstrate the assumptions required for and limits of this excuse. Applying the idea of ‘the state of nature’ from Thomas Hobbes, we suggest (...)
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  5. Animals as Stakeholders.Joshua Smart - forthcoming - In Natalie Thomas (ed.), Animals and Business Ethics. Springer.
    Animals have moral status, and we have corresponding obligations to take their interests into account. I argue that Stakeholder Theory provides a moderate, yet principled way for businesses to do so. Animals ought to be treated as stakeholders given that they affect and are affected by the achievement of the objectives of the businesses in which they are involved. Stakeholder Theory therefore requires taking those interests into account. It does not, however, require that they be given the same weight as (...)
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  6. Businesses, Technological Innovations, and Responsibility.Aatif Abbas - 2023 - Business and Professional Ethics Journal 42 (3):269-290.
    This article argues that businesses are morally responsible for compensating the people harmed by their activities even if they were not negligent, i.e., the businesses took reasonable precautions. Critics of this position maintain that responsibility requires choice, and by taking precautions, businesses choose not to harm others. This article accepts their argument’s first premise but rejects the second premise. It contends that businesses often seek risky or innovative activities to increase profits, and the essence of innovative activities is that precautions (...)
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  7. Engaging Engineering Teams Through Moral Imagination: A Bottom-Up Approach for Responsible Innovation and Ethical Culture Change in Technology Companies.Benjamin Lange, Geoff Keeling, Amanda McCroskery, Ben Zevenbergen, Sandra Blascovich, Kyle Pedersen, Alison Lentz & Blaise Aguera Y. Arcas - 2023 - AI and Ethics 1:1-16.
    We propose a ‘Moral Imagination’ methodology to facilitate a culture of responsible innovation for engineering and product teams in technology companies. Our approach has been operationalized over the past two years at Google, where we have conducted over 50 workshops with teams from across the organization. We argue that our approach is a crucial complement to existing formal and informal initiatives for fostering a culture of ethical awareness, deliberation, and decision-making in technology design such as company principles, ethics and privacy (...)
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  8. Business Ethics: Game Theory.Garrett Pendergraft - 2023 - In Lakshmi B. Nair (ed.), Sage Business Foundations.
    Game theory involves deliberating about what to do in light of what other people are likely to do. One of the central frameworks of game theory is the prisoner’s dilemma, in which participants who make rational choices end up in suboptimal outcomes. Using the prisoner’s dilemma to model competition between firms sets the stage for a new and promising approach to business ethics: the market failures approach.
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  9. Markets Within the Limit of Feasibility.Kenneth Silver - 2023 - Journal of Business Ethics 182:1087-1101.
    The ‘limits of markets’ debate broadly concerns the question of when it is (im)permissible to have a market in some good. Markets can be of tremendous benefit to society, but many have felt that certain goods should not be for sale (e.g., sex, kidneys, bombs). Their sale is argued to be corrupting, exploitative, or to express a form of disrespect. InMarkets without Limits, Jason Brennan and Peter Jaworski have recently argued to the contrary: For any good, as long as it (...)
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  10. Business Ethics Denial: Scale Development and Validation.Hasko von Kriegstein & Kristyn A. Scott - 2023 - Personality and Individual Differences 210.
    Economistic Business Ethics Denial (BED) is the belief that contemporary business has features that make it systematically incompatible with ethics. Using over 1200 participants across seven separate samples we established the substantive validity of a BED Scale, confirmed its theorized structure, psychometric properties, convergent, and discriminant validity. The results suggest that the scale assesses four correlated factors of economistic BED. The scale can be used in future research on ethical decision making in business, and business ethics education.
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  11. The Harm Principle and Corporate Welfare (or Market Libertarianism vs. Promotionism).Andrew Jason Cohen - 2022 - Georgetown Journal of Law and Public Policy 19:787-812.
    I aim in this paper to provide defense of one way to look at what should be regulated in the market place. In particular, I discuss what should be tolerated and argue against corporate welfare. I begin by endorsing John Stuart Mill’s harm principle as a normative principle of toleration. I call strict commitment to the harm principle when considering the regulatory structure of markets market libertarianism and oppose that to promotionism, the view that endorses government interference to promote business (...)
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  12. A Contractualist Defense of Sweatshop Regulation.Huseyin S. Kuyumcuoglu - 2022 - Business Ethics Journal Review 10 (2):8-13.
    Kates argues that ex ante contractualism fails to defend interference with sweatshops on moral grounds. In this commentary, I argue that Kates does not apply this approach correctly. Ex ante contractualism, indeed, successfully defends interference and thus should still be considered an appealing alternative to other moral approaches for evaluating when and how to interfere in sweatshop conditions to help workers.
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  13. That’s None of Your Business! On the Limits of Employer Control of Employee Behavior Outside of Working Hours.Matthew Lister - 2022 - Canadian Journal of Law and Jurisprudence 35 (2):405-26.
    Employers seeking to control employee behavior outside of working hours is nothing new. However, recent developments have extended efforts to control employee behavior into new areas, with new significance. Employers seek to control legal behavior by employees outside of working hours, to have significant influence over employee’s health-related behavior, and to monitor and control employee’s social media, even when this behavior has nothing to do with the workplace. In this article, I draw on the work of political theorists Jon Elster, (...)
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  14. The Harm Principle and Corporations.Andrew Jason Cohen - 2021 - In Johannes Drerup & Gottfried Schweiger (eds.), Toleration and the Challenges to Liberalism. NY: Routledge. pp. 202-217.
    In this paper, I defend what may seem a surprising view: that John Stuart Mill’s famous harm principle would, if taken to be what justifies government action, disallow the existence of corporations. My claim is not that harmful activities of currently existing corporations warrants their losing corporate status according to the harm principle. The claim, rather, is that taken strictly, the harm principle and the legal possibility of incorporation are mutually exclusive. This view may be surprising—and I do not at (...)
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  15. Regulatory Entrepreneurship, Fair Competition, and Obeying the Law.Robert C. Hughes - 2021 - Journal of Business Ethics 181 (1):249-261.
    AbstractSome sharing economy firms have adopted a strategy of “regulatory entrepreneurship,” openly violating regulations with the aim of rendering them dead letters. This article argues that in a democracy, regulatory entrepreneurship is a presumptively unethical business strategy. In all but the most corrupt political environments, businesses that seek to change their regulatory environment should do so through the democratic political process, and they should do so without using illegal business practices to build a political constituency. To show this, the article (...)
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  16. Intolerable Ideologies and the Obligation to Discriminate.Tim Loughrist - 2021 - Business and Professional Ethics Journal 40 (2):131-156.
    In this paper, I argue that businesses bear a pro tanto, negative, moral obligation to refuse to engage in economic relationships with representatives of intolerable ideologies. For example, restaurants should refuse to serve those displaying Nazi symbols. The crux of this argument is the claim that normal economic activity is not a morally neutral activity but rather an exercise of political power. When a business refuses to engage with someone because of their membership in some group, e.g., Black Americans, this (...)
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  17. Strategy (Part I): Conceptual Foundations.Kenneth Silver - 2021 - Philosophy Compass 16 (1):e12717.
    Strategies are mentioned across a variety of domains, from business ethics, to the philosophy of war, philosophy of sport, game theory, and others. However, despite their wide use, very little has been said about how to think about what strategies are or how they relate to other prominently discussed concepts. In this article, I probe the close connection between strategies and plans, which have been much more thoroughly characterized in the philosophy of action. After highlighting the challenges of analyzing strategies (...)
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  18. You Can Bluff but You Should Not Spoof.Gil Hersch - 2020 - Business and Professional Ethics Journal 39 (2):207-224.
    Spoofing is the act of placing orders to buy or sell a financial contract without the intention to have those orders fulfilled in order to create the impression that there is a large demand for that contract at that price. In this article, I deny the view that spoofing in financial markets should be viewed as morally permissible analogously to the way bluffing is permissible in poker. I argue for the pro tanto moral impermissibility of spoofing and make the case (...)
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  19. Animals Deserve Moral Consideration.Scott Hill - 2020 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 33 (2):177-185.
    Timothy Hsiao asks a good question: Why believe animals deserve moral consideration? His answer is that we should not. He considers various other answers and finds them wanting. In this paper I consider an answer Hsiao has not yet discussed: We should accept a conservative view about how to form beliefs. And such a view will instruct us to believe that animals deserve moral consideration. I think conservatives like Hsiao do best to answer his question in a way that upholds (...)
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  20. Pricing Medicine Fairly.Robert C. Hughes - 2020 - Philosophy of Management 19 (4):369-385.
    Recently, dramatic price increases by several pharmaceutical companies have provoked public outrage. These scandals raise questions both about how pharmaceutical firms should be regulated and about how pharmaceutical executives ethically ought to make pricing decisions when drug prices are largely unregulated. Though there is an extensive literature on the regulatory question, the ethical question has been largely unexplored. This article defends a Kantian approach to the ethics of pharmaceutical pricing in an unregulated market. To the extent possible, pharmaceutical companies must (...)
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  21. Distributive Justice and Precarious Work.Kyle Johannsen - 2019 - In Alex Sager & Fritz Allhoff (eds.), Business Cases in Ethical Focus. Peterborough, CA: Broadview Press. pp. 165-73.
    This case study analyzes precarious employment from the perspective of different theories of distributive justice. Its purpose is to serve as a learning tool for students in business ethics courses.
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  22. Virtue Ethics and Meaningful Work: A Contemporary Buddhist Approach.Ferdinand Tablan - 2019 - Humanities Bulletin 2:22-38.
    This study adds to the existing literature on meaningful work by offering a cross-cultural perspective. Since work shapes the kind of person that we are and plays an important role in our well-being, some theorists have adopted a virtue theory approach to meaningful work using an Aristotelian-MacIntyrean framework. For lack of a better term, I will call this a western virtue theory. This paper presents a contemporary virtue-focused Buddhist perspective on the topic. While a virtue-ethics interpretation of Buddhism is now (...)
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  23. Le sens du travail et la philosophie d'Alexandre Kojève.Yusuke Kaneko - 2018 - Problemata 9 (2):63-79.
    One can work for another person, probably for all the others in an ethical way, and not for money. This is the main idea pursued in this article. When it comes to labour, we are inclined to deal with Marx. But even Marx apparently did not notice this ethical side of labour, because his focus was mainly on the creation of value, which was common among thinkers at that time, such as Locke and Smith. In contrast, Hegel consistently tackled the (...)
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  24. Exploring Discourse Ethics for Tourism Transformation.Jose L. Lopez-González - 2018 - Tourism 66 (3):269-281.
    The 'critical turn' in tourism studies is defined as a research perspective that explores social transfor- mation in and through tourism by facing the negative impact of strategic-instrumental rationality on this activity. This work explores the features of discourse ethics that may normatively support tourism transformation, a gap that has not been thoroughly discussed in tourism research. For this purpose, the study combines the use of critical and ethical theory with an analysis of discourse ethics in tourism literature to demonstrate (...)
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  25. Why Business Firms Have Moral Obligations to Mitigate Climate Change.Anne Schwenkenbecher - 2018 - In Martin Brueckner, Rochelle Spencer & Megan Paull (eds.), Disciplining the Undisciplined? Perspectives from Business, Society and Politics on Responsible Citizenship, Corporate Social Responsibility and Sustainability. Springer. pp. 55-70.
    Without doubt, the global challenges we are currently facing—above all world poverty and climate change—require collective solutions: states, national and international organizations, firms and business corporations as well as individuals must work together in order to remedy these problems. In this chapter, I discuss climate change mitigation as a collective action problem from the perspective of moral philosophy. In particular, I address and refute three arguments suggesting that business firms and corporations have no moral duty to reduce greenhouse gas emissions: (...)
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  26. Property and Business.Bas Van Der Vossen - 2018 - In Eugene Heath, Byron Kaldis & Alexei Marcoux (eds.), The Routledge Handbook of Business Ethics. Routledge. pp. 309-325.
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  27. The Ethics of Cloud Computing.Boudewijn de Bruin & Luciano Floridi - 2017 - Science and Engineering Ethics 23 (1):21-39.
    Cloud computing is rapidly gaining traction in business. It offers businesses online services on demand (such as Gmail, iCloud and Salesforce) and allows them to cut costs on hardware and IT support. This is the first paper in business ethics dealing with this new technology. It analyzes the informational duties of hosting companies that own and operate cloud computing datacenters (e.g., Amazon). It considers the cloud services providers leasing ‘space in the cloud’ from hosting companies (e.g, Dropbox, Salesforce). And it (...)
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  28. Can’t Buy Me Love.Jacob Sparks - 2017 - Journal of Philosophical Research 42:341-352.
    Critics of commodification often claim that the buying and selling of some good communicates disrespect or some other inappropriate attitude. Such semiotic critiques have been leveled against markets in sex, pornography, kidneys, surrogacy, blood, and many other things. Brennan and Jaworski (2015a) have recently argued that all such objections fail. They claim that the meaning of a market transaction is a highly contingent, socially constructed fact. If allowing a market for one of these goods can improve the supply, access or (...)
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  29. Distributive Justice: The Case of Café Feminino.Kyle Johannsen - 2016 - In Fritz Allhoff, Alex Sager & Anand Vaidya (eds.), Business in Ethical Focus, 2nd Edition. Peterborough, CA: Broadview Press. pp. 706-10.
    This case study analyzes the Fair Trade coffee label "Café Feminino" (as well as Fair Trade more generally) from the perspective of different theories of distributive justice. Its purpose is to serve as a learning tool for students in business ethics courses.
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  30. Between Social Justice and Market Justice: Ethics of Health Care Leadership.Marvin J. H. Lee - 2016 - Journal of Healthcare Ethics and Administration 2 (2).
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  31. Agrobiodiversität, das Gemeinschaftserbe-Prinzip und Marktanreize.Cristian Timmermann & Zoë Robaey - 2016 - In Barbara Brandl & Stephan Schleissing (eds.), Biopatente – Saatgut als Ware und als öffentliches Gut. Nomos. pp. 109-131.
    Die Diversität von Nahrungspflanzen, ein Ergebnis Jahrtausende langer Zuchtbemühungen, ist in den letzten Jahrzehnten dramatisch zurückgegangen. Schätzungen zufolge machen von den über 7000 Nahrungspflanzenarten ganze 103 Sorten 90% der Nahrungsmittelproduktion aus. Dieser Verlust könnte in Zukunft gewaltige negative Auswirkungen auf die Nahrungsmittelsicherheit haben, da die Biodiversität eine zentrale Rolle bei der Absorbierung biotischer und abiotischer Stressfaktoren spielt, die auf die Pflanzen wirken. Darüber hinaus stellt der Verlust eine bedeutende Verarmung nicht nur des Pools genetischer Ressourcen dar, die zukünftigen Generationen zur (...)
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  32. Work.Edmund Byrne - 2015 - In James Britt Holbrook (ed.), Ethics, Science, Technology, and Engineering, Vol. 4, 2nd Ed. Farmington Hills: Gale. pp. 543-549.
    The globalization of and technological challenge to the world's workers generate profound ethical problems. Suitable solutions will require governments and civil societies to move beyond the modern tendencies to divinize property rights and base people's income eligibility almost exclusively on their work. Some attention is being paid to the issues involved therein so as to achieve better work/life balance. In some places, in fact, resource-based wealth has been distributed to all citizens, even to those not directly involved in generating the (...)
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  33. Iniciativas e incidencia de las políticas socialmente responsables en la promoción de la salud y seguridad en el trabajo.Lina Marrugo-Salas & Iván Vargas-Chaves - 2014 - In Vestigium Ire 7:13-22.
    La prevención de riesgos laborales y la responsabilidad social empresarial son disciplinas que están directamente relacionadas, ya que dentro de sus objetivos se encuentra garantizar el bienestar, la seguridad y salud de los trabajadores en calidad de grupo de interés prioritario. En este sentido, el propósito del presente texto yace en demostrar el papel que tiene la gestión de los riesgos asociados al trabajo en la implementación de estrategias de responsabilidad social en las organizaciones, analizando las iniciativas más reconocidas que (...)
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  34. Whither Business Ethics?Wayne Norman - 2012 - Les ateliers de l'éthique/The Ethics Forum 7 (3):31-40.
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  35. The Health Impact Fund and the Right to Participate in the Advancement of Science.Cristian Timmermann - 2012 - European Journal of Applied Ethics 1 (1).
    Taking into consideration the extremely harsh public health conditions faced by the majority of the world population, the Health Impact Fund (HIF) proposal seeks to make the intellectual property regimes more in line with human rights obligations. While prioritizing access to medicines and research on neglected diseases, the HIF makes many compromises in order to be conceived as politically feasible and to retain a compensation character that makes its implementation justified solely on basis of negative duties. Despite that current global (...)
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  36. Should We Draw a Line Between Business And Ethics?Yusuke Kaneko - 2011 - The ACERP 2011 Conference Proceedings 1 (1):195-208.
    Referring to the difference between Stakeholder Theory and Shareholder Theory, the ethical direction for companies to take is deeply discussed.
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  37. A conceptual and (preliminary) normative exploration of waste.Andrew Jason Cohen - 2010 - Social Philosophy and Policy 27 (2):233-273.
    In this paper, I first argue that waste is best understood as (a) any process wherein something useful becomes less useful and that produces less benefit than is lost—where benefit and usefulness are understood with reference to the same metric—or (b) the result of such a process. I next argue for the immorality of waste. My concluding suggestions are that (W1) if one person needs something for her preservation and a second person has it, is avoidably wasting it, and refuses (...)
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  38. Merchants, Master-Manufacturers and Greedy People. [REVIEW]Sergio Volodia Marcello Cremaschi - 2007 - History of Economic Ideas 15 (2):143-154.
    A discussion of McCloskey's argument for a bourgeois virtue ethics. I criticize his opposition of Adam Smith's and Kant's ethics, arguing that they share much more than the author believes. I criticize the idea that what is most respectable in modern liberal-democratic societies is a gift of Capitalism.
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  39. mercato.Sergio Volodia Marcello Cremaschi & Bruna Ingrao - 2006 - In Virgilio Melchiorre (ed.), Enciclopedia filosofica. Milano, Italy: Bompiani. pp. 7302-7307.
    A reconstruction of the notion of Market in the history of economic ethics and economic theory.
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  40. Review of Gertrude Ezorsky (ed.) Moral Rights in the Workplace. [REVIEW]Edmund Byrne - 1988 - Labor Studies Journal 13 (4):80-82.
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  41. Review of Robert Howard, Brave New Workplace. [REVIEW]Edmund Byrne - 1987 - Labor Studies Journal 12 (1):99-100.
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