View topic on PhilPapers for more information
Related categories

3 found
Order:
More results on PhilPapers
  1. added 2016-04-16
    Aesthetics and Morality in Kant and Confucius. A Second Step.Christian Helmut Wenzel - 2010 - In Stephen Palmquist (ed.), Cultivating Personhood. Kant and Asian Philosophy. Walter de Gruyter. pp. 321-332.
    In the framework of his transcendental philosophy, Kant strictly separates morality from aesthetics. The pleasure in the good and the pleasure in the beautiful are two different kinds of pleasure (Arten des Wohlgefallens). As a consequence, a moral act as such cannot be beautiful. It is only in a second step that Kant indicates possible connections, in his comments on aesthetic ideas, symbolism, the sensus communis, and education in general. In Confucius on the other hand we do not find such (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  2. added 2014-12-10
    Fine Aphorisms, Proverbs & Philosophical Quotes.Yoji K. Gondor (ed.) - 2014 - Sintesi Point Publishing.
    This is a small collection of proverbs with some philosophical content. I also included here are some of my favorite philosophical quotes. The quotes were collected during many years from my personal reading. I am sure that the reader will identify and enjoy proverbs and some quotes that are new and unique to this publication. A printed copy available at amazon.com. Feedback: gondork@yahoo.com .
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  3. added 2014-09-02
    Generativities: Western Philosophy, Chinese Painting, and the Yijing.Eric S. Nelson - 2013 - Orbis Idearum 1 (1):97–104.
    Western philosophy has been defined through the exclusion of non-Western forms of thought as non-philo-sophical. In this paper, I place the notion of what is “properly” philosophy into question by contrasting the essence/appearance paradigm governing Western metaphysics and its deconstructive critics with the more fluid, dynamic, and participatory forms of encountering and performatively enacting the world that are articulated in Chinese thinking and made apparent in Chinese painting. In this hermeneutical contrast, Western and Chinese thinking themselves are interpeted as co-relational (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark