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  1. added 2017-09-11
    Ways of Doing Cross-Cultural Philosophy.Koji Tanaka - 2016 - In John Makeham (ed.), Learning from the Other: Australian and Chinese Perspectives on Philosophy. Canberra: Australian Academy of the Humanities. pp. 59-65.
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  2. added 2017-01-24
    Introduction: Intersections Between Chinese and Western Philosophies.Eric S. Nelson - 2012 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 39 (S1):5-9.
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  3. added 2017-01-23
    中國哲學之“是”與“實”“事”“史”“時”“勢”.Keqian Xu - 2007 - Jounal of Nanjing Normal University 2007 (5):29-33.
    The fundamental task of philosophy is to seek for “Shi” or “Being”. One of the features of Chinese Philosophy is that it seeks “Shi是(Bing)” through“shi实(fact)”, “shi事(event)”, “shi史(history)”, “shi时(time)”, “shi势(trend)”, which constituted the general context of understanding and hermeneutic of “Shi(Bing)”in Chinese philosophy. This also represents the practical, humanistic and dialectic features of Chinese philosophy.
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  4. added 2017-01-21
    A Treatise on Efficacy: Between Western and Chinese Thinking (Review). [REVIEW]Jeremy Henkel - 2006 - Philosophy East and West 56 (2):347-451.
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  5. added 2014-03-29
    Complementarity as a Model for East-West Integrative Philosophy.Robert E. Allinson - 1998 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 25 (4):505-517.
    The discovery of a letter in the Niels Bohr archives written by Bohr to a Danish schoolteacher in which he reveals his early knowledge of the Daodejing led the present author on a search to unveil the influence of the philosophy of Yin-Yang on Bohr's famed complementarity principle in Western physics. This paper recounts interviews with his son, Hans, who recalls Bohr reading a translated copy of Laozi, as well as Hanna Rosental, close friend and associate who also confirms the (...)
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  6. added 2014-03-06
    Language and Emptiness in Chan Buddhism and the Early Heidegger.Eric S. Nelson - 2010 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 37 (3):472-492.
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  7. added 2014-03-04
    Introduction: Levels of Perspectives in Kant and Chinese Philosophy.Stephen R. Palmquist - 2011 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 38 (4):505-508.
    This short essay introduces a set of articles I compiled for a special issue of the Journal of Chinese Philosophy in 2011. Most of the essays are revised versions of papers originally presented at the "Kant in Asia" international conference on "The Unity of Human Personhood", held in Hong Kong in May of 2009, and subsequently published in the collection entitled Cultivating Personhood: Kant and Asian Philosophy (Berlin: Walter de Gruyter, 2010). After introducing the papers in the special issue, the (...)
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  8. added 2014-03-04
    Kant and China: Aesthetics, Race, and Nature.Eric S. Nelson - 2011 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 38 (4):509-525.
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  9. added 2014-03-04
    The Yijing and Philosophy: From Leibniz to Derrida.Eric S. Nelson - 2011 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 38 (3):377-396.
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  10. added 2012-03-08
    Rorty, Pragmatism, and Confucianism. [REVIEW]Andrew Lambert - 2012 - Philosophy East and West 62 (1):134-139.
    Rorty, Pragmatism, and Confucianism, a collection of twelve essays on the work of Richard Rorty and its relation to Confucian thought, arose out of a conference in Shanghai in 2004, where participants were granted access to several of Rorty’s unpublished manuscripts. In his introduction, the editor Yong Huang states his desire to outline areas of shared interest in Rortian and Confucian thought. He notes, for example, the similarities between Rorty’s view that sentiment is “central to the moral consciousness” (p. 2) (...)
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  11. added 2011-08-15
    China, Nature, and the Sublime in Kant.Eric S. Nelson - 2010 - In Stephen R. Palmquist (ed.), Cultivating Personhood: Kant and Asian Philosophy. Walter de Gruyter. pp. 333--348.
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  12. added 2011-08-15
    Leibniz and China: Religion, Hermeneutics, and Enlightenment.Eric S. Nelson - 2009 - Religion in the Age of Enlightenment (RAE) 1: 277-300.
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  13. added 2011-08-11
    Emptiness and Experience: Pure and Impure.John W. M. Krummel - 2004 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 4 (1):57-76.
    This paper discusses the idea of "pure experience" within the context of the Buddhist tradition and in connection with the notions of emptiness and dependent origination via a reading of Dale Wright's reading of 'Huangbo' in his 'Philosophical Meditations on Zen Buddhism'. The purpose is to appropriate Wright's text in order to engender a response to Steven Katz's contextualist-constructivist thesis that there are no "pure" (i.e., unmediated) experiences. In light of the Mahayana claim that everything is empty of substance, i.e., (...)
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  14. added 2011-06-18
    Qing (情) and Emotion in Early Chinese Thought.Brian Bruya - 2003 - In Keli Fang (ed.), Chinese Philosophy and the Trends of the 21st Century Civilization. Commercial Press.
    In a 1967 article, A. C. Graham made the claim that 情 qing should never be translated as "emotions" in rendering early Chinese texts into English. Over time, sophisticated translators and interpreters have taken this advice to heart, and qing has come to be interpreted as "the facts" or "what is genuine in one." In these English terms all sense of interrelationality is gone, leaving us with a wooden, objective stasis. But we also know, again partly through the work of (...)
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