View topic on PhilPapers for more information
Related categories

21 found
Order:
More results on PhilPapers
  1. ‘Half Victim, Half Accomplice’: Cat Person and Narcissism.Filipa Melo Lopes - forthcoming - Ergo: An Open Access Journal of Philosophy.
    At the end of 2017, Kristen Roupenian’s short story, Cat Person, went viral. Published at the height of the #MeToo movement, it depicted a ‘toxic date’ and a disturbing sexual encounter between Margot, a college student, and Robert, an older man she meets at work. The story was widely viewed as a relatable denunciation of women’s powerlessness and routine victimization. In this paper, I push against this common reading. I propose an alternative feminist interpretation through the lens of Simone de (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  2. Response to Open Peer Commentaries on “How Payment for Research Participation Can Be Coercive”.Joseph Millum & Michael Garnett - 2020 - American Journal of Bioethics 20 (8):W8-W11.
    Volume 20, Issue 8, August 2020, Page W8-W11.
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  3. Mandating Vaccination.Anthony Skelton & Lisa Forsberg - 2020 - In Meredith Celene Schwartz (ed.), The Ethics of Pandemics. pp. 131-134.
    A short piece exploring some arguments for mandating vaccination for Covid-19.
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  4. Sanctioning.Lucas Miotto - 2018 - Jurisprudence 9 (2):236-250.
    Up until recently, most legal philosophers have argued that an action is a token of sanctioning if, and only if, (i) its performance brings about unwelcome consequences to the targets, and (ii) it is performed as a response to the breach of a duty. In this paper I take issue with this account. I first add some qualifications to it in order to present it in its most plausible form. After doing this, I advance a series of hypothetical cases which (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  5. African Values and Capital Punishment.Thaddeus Metz - 2017 - In Gerard Walmsley (ed.), African Philosophy and the Future of Africa. Council for Research in Values and Philosophy. pp. 83-90.
    What is the strongest argument grounded in African values, i.e., those salient among indigenous peoples below the Sahara desert, for abolishing capital punishment? I defend a particular answer to this question, one that invokes an under-theorized conception of human dignity. Roughly, I maintain that the death penalty is nearly always morally unjustified, and should therefore be abolished, because it degrades people’s special capacity for communal relationships. To defend this claim, I proceed by clarifying what I aim to achieve in this (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  6. Conceptualizing Rape as Coerced Sex.Scott A. Anderson - 2016 - Ethics 127 (1):50-87.
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  7. Epistemic Exploitation.Nora Berenstain - 2016 - Ergo: An Open Access Journal of Philosophy 3:569-590.
    Epistemic exploitation occurs when privileged persons compel marginalized persons to educate them about the nature of their oppression. I argue that epistemic exploitation is marked by unrecognized, uncompensated, emotionally taxing, coerced epistemic labor. The coercive and exploitative aspects of the phenomenon are exemplified by the unpaid nature of the educational labor and its associated opportunity costs, the double bind that marginalized persons must navigate when faced with the demand to educate, and the need for additional labor created by the default (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   29 citations  
  8. Coercion in Community Health Care-an Ethical Analysis.Tania Gergel & George Szmukler - 2016 - In A. Molodynski, J. Rugkasa & T. Burns (eds.), Coercion in Community Mental Health Care: International Perspectives. Oxford University Press.
    A book chapter exploring the potential consquences and ethical ramifications of using coercive measures within community mental healthcare. We argue that, althogh the move towards 'care in the community' may have had liberalising motivations, the subsequent reduction in inpatient or other supported residential provision, means that there has been an increasing move towards coercive measures outside of formal inpatient detention. We consider measures such as Community Treatment Orders, inducements, and other forms of leverage, explaining the underlying concepts, aims, and exploring (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  9. Enforcement Matters: Reframing the Philosophical Debate Over Immigration.José Jorge Mendoza - 2015 - Journal of Speculative Philosophy 29 (1):73-90.
    In debating the ethics of immigration, philosophers have focused much of their attention on determining whether a political community ought to have the discretionary right to control immigration. They have not, however, given the same amount of consideration to determining whether there are any ethical limits on how a political community enforces its immigration policy. This article, therefore, offers a different approach to immigration justice. It presents a case against legitimate states having discretionary control over immigration by showing both how (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  10. The Duplicity of Online Behavior.Joseph Ulatowski - 2015 - In Berrin Beasley & Mitchell Haney (eds.), Social Media and Living Well. Lanham, MD: Lexington Books. pp. 31-43.
    People commonly believe that any form of deception, no matter how innocuous it is and no matter whether the deceiving person intended it otherwise, is always morally wrong. In this paper, I will argue that deceiving in real-time is morally distinguishable from deceiving on-line because online actions aren’t as fine-grained as actions occurring in real-time. Our failure to detect the fine-grained characteristics of another avatar leads us to believe that that avatar intended to do a moral harm. Openly deceiving someone (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  11. Moral Coercion.Saba Bazargan - 2014 - Philosophers' Imprint 14.
    The practices of using hostages to obtain concessions and using human shields to deter aggression share an important characteristic which warrants a univocal reference to both sorts of conduct: they both involve manipulating our commitment to morality, as a means to achieving wrongful ends. I call this type of conduct “moral coercion”. In this paper I (a) present an account of moral coercion by linking it to coercion more generally, (b) determine whether and to what degree the coerced agent is (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  12. Coercion and Captivity.Lisa Rivera - 2014 - In Lori Gruen (ed.), The Ethics of Captivity. pp. 248-271.
    This paper considers three modes of captivity with an eye to examining the effects of captivity on free agency and whether these modes depend on or constitute coercion. These modes are: physical captivity, psychological captivity, and social/legal captivity. All these modes of captivity may severely impact capacities a person relies on for free agency in different ways. They may also undermine or destroy a person’s identity-constituting cares and values. On a Nozick-style view of coercion, coercion amounts to conditional threats and (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  13. Coercive Wage Offers.Scott Anderson - 2013 - In Hugh LaFollette (ed.), The International Encyclopedia of Ethics. Blackwell. pp. 847-850.
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  14. Institutional Power, Collective Acceptance, and Recognition.Titus Stahl - 2011 - In Heikki Ikäheimo & Arto Laitinen (eds.), Recognition and Social Ontology. Brill. pp. 349--372.
    The article defines the boundaries of social and institutional power clearly; it argues that all institutional power rests finally on the acceptance of sanctioning authority and thus on mutual recognition.
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  15. When the State Speaks, What Should It Say? The Dilemmas of Freedom of Expression and Democratic Persuasion.Corey Brettschneider - 2010 - Perspectives on Politics 8 (4):1005-1019.
    Hate groups are often thought to reveal a paradox in liberal thinking. On the one hand, such groups challenge the very foundations of liberal thought, including core values of equality and freedom. On the other hand, these same values underlie the rights such as freedom of expression and association that protect hate groups. Thus a liberal democratic state that extends those protections to such groups in the name of value neutrality and freedom of expression may be thought to be undermining (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  16. Review of Bert van den Brink and David Owen (eds.), Recognition and Power. Axel Honneth and the Tradition of Critical Social Theory. [REVIEW]Marco Solinas - 2010 - Iride: Filosofia e Discussione Pubblica (59):223-224.
    Remove from this list   Download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  17. How Did There Come To Be Two Kinds of Coercion?Scott Anderson - 2008 - In David A. Reidy & Walter J. Riker (eds.), Coercion and the State. Springer Verlag. pp. 17-29.
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  18. The Legalization of Drugs. [REVIEW]Kalle Grill - 2007 - Theoria 73 (4):248-255.
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  19. The Boundary of Justice and The Justice of Boundaries.Kok-Chor Tan - 2006 - Canadian Journal of Law and Jurisprudence 29 (2):319-344.
    Two classes of arguments are often deployed by the anti-global egalitarians against attempts to universalize the demands of distributive equality. One are arguments attempting to show that global egalitarians have misconstrued the reasons for why equality matters domestically, and hence have wrongly extended these reasons to the global arena. These arguments hold that the boundary of distributive justice is effectively coextensive with the boundaries of state. The other are arguments that attempt to show that membership in political societies generates special (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  20. Choice, Consent, and the Legitimacy of Market Transactions.Fabienne Peter - 2004 - Economics and Philosophy 20 (1):1-18.
    According to an often repeated definition, economics is the science of individual choices and their consequences. The emphasis on choice is often used – implicitly or explicitly – to mark a contrast between markets and the state: While the price mechanism in well-functioning markets preserves freedom of choice and still efficiently coordinates individual actions, the state has to rely to some degree on coercion to coordinate individual actions. Since coercion should not be used arbitrarily, coordination by the state needs to (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   15 citations  
  21. Authority and Coercion.Arthur Ripstein - 2004 - Philosophy and Public Affairs 32 (1):2-35.
    I am grateful to Donald Ainslie, Lisa Austin, Michael Blake, Abraham Drassinower, David Dyzenhaus, George Fletcher, Robert Gibbs, Louis-Philippe Hodgson, Sari Kisilevsky, Dennis Klimchuk, Christopher Morris, Scott Shapiro, Horacio Spector, Sergio Tenenbaum, Malcolm Thorburn, Ernest Weinrib, Karen Weisman, and the Editors of Philosophy & Public Affairs for comments, and audiences in the UCLA Philosophy Department and Columbia Law School for their questions.
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   50 citations