View topic on PhilPapers for more information
Related categories

6 found
Order:
More results on PhilPapers
  1. Comics and Ethics.Jon Robson - forthcoming - In F. Bramlett, R. Cook & A. Meskin (eds.), Routledge Companion to Comics and Graphic Novels. Routledge.
    Remove from this list   Download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  2. On Superhero Stories: The Marvel Cinematic Universe as Tolkienesque Fantasy.A. G. Holdier - 2018 - Mythlore: A Journal of J.R.R. Tolkien, C.S. Lewis, Charles Williams, and Mythopoeic Literature 36 (2):Article 6.
    By considering the movies in the Marvel Cinematic Universe as a case study, I bring Tolkien’s explication of mythopoesis in “On Fairy Stories” to bear on the current popularity of superhero films to argue that such works qualify as cinematic examples of Tolkienesque fantasy tales. After summarizing Tolkien’s criteria for the genre in Nietzschean aesthetic terms, I both demonstrate how the builders of the MCU have crafted a sub-created fictional world and defend the existence of fairy stories in visual media (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  3. In Defense of Comic Pluralism.Nathaniel Sharadin - 2017 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 20 (2):375-392.
    Jokes are sometimes morally objectionable, and sometimes they are not. What’s the relationship between a joke’s being morally objectionable and its being funny? Philosophers’ answers to this question run the gamut. In this paper I present a new argument for the view that the negative moral value of a joke can affect its comedic value both positively and negatively.
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  4. Defining Comics.Aaron Meskin - 2016 - In Aaron Meskin, Frank Bramlett & Roy Cook (eds.), Routledge Companion to Comics. Routledge. pp. 221-229.
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  5. Comics and Genre.Catharine Abell - 2012 - In Aaron Meskin & Roy T. Cook (eds.), The Art of Comics: A Philosophical Approach. Blackwell. pp. 68--84.
    An adequate account of the nature of genre and of the criteria for genre membership is essential to understanding the nature of the various categories into which comics can be classified. Because they fail adequately to distinguish genre categories from other ways of categorizing works, including categorizations according to medium or according to style, previous accounts of genre fail to illuminate the nature of comics categories. I argue that genres are sets of conventions that have developed as means of addressing (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  6. Comics & Collective Authorship.Christy Mag Uidhir - 2012 - In Aaron Meskin & Roy T. Cook (eds.), The Art of Comics: A Philosophical Approach. Wiley-Blackwell. pp. 47-67.
    Most mass-art comics (e.g., “superhero” comics) are collectively produced, that is, different people are responsible for different production elements. As such, the more disparate comic production roles we begin to regard as significantly or uniquely contributory, the more difficult questions of comic authorship become, and the more we view various distinct production roles as potentially constitutive is the more we must view comic authorship as potentially collective authorship. Given the general unreliability of intuitions with respect to collective authorship (coupled with (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark