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  1. Aşk Ereni Diotima: Diotima’nın Eros’u ve Anadolu Tasavvufu.Ömer Mızrak - forthcoming - Beytulhikme An International Journal of Philosophy.
    There are many similarities in both form and content between the path Diotima described in order to reach Beauty through Eros which we encounter in Plato's Symposion dialogue and the tenets of the Anatolian Sufism which is a religion of love. Rather than investigating whether there is any organic connec-tion between the two approaches or the channels through which such a connec-tion is established, this study aims to show the two approaches in light of each other. Thus, it is argued (...)
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  2. Acerca do belo no Hípias Maior de Platão.Beatriz Saar - 2023 - Dissertation, Universidade Federal Do Rio de Janeiro
    O objetivo deste estudo é propor um modelo explicativo ao problema da beleza desenvolvido no diálogo Hípias Maior de Platão. É um lugar-comum entre os estudiosos defender o senso aporético do diálogo, ressaltando como todas as hipóteses formuladas são descartadas pelos interlocutores, tese que é geralmente endossada pela afirmação final de que as coisas belas são difíceis (304e8). No entanto, no epicentro deste emaranhado de hipóteses, algumas conclusões importantes surgem e serão, conforme se espera demonstrar, fortemente incorporadas em outros lugares (...)
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  3. A beleza do marfim e da pedra: notas sobre Hípias Maior.Beatriz Saar - 2022 - Analogos 1:20-35.
    Este estudo tem por objetivo principal abordar a segunda definição de belo (καλός) oferecida pelo sofista Hípias de Élis no diálogo Hípias Maior de Platão. Após o fracasso da primeira tentativa, de que o belo seria uma bela donzela (Hp. mai. 287e), Sócrates introduz um novo elemento à investigação: a ideia de que é preciso descobrir a forma (εἶδος) que, quando acrescentada (προσγένηται), fará com que um ser surja (φαίνεται) belo (Hp. mai. 289d). Diante dessa nova compreensão, Hípias desenvolve a (...)
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  4. Soul-Leading in Plato's Phaedrus and the Iconic Character of Being.Ryan M. Brown - 2021 - Dissertation, Boston College
    Since antiquity, scholars have observed a structural tension within Plato’s Phaedrus. The dialogue demands order in every linguistic composition, yet it presents itself as a disordered composition. Accordingly, one of the key problems of the Phaedrus is determining which—if any—aspect of the dialogue can supply a unifying thread for the dialogue’s major themes (love, rhetoric, writing, myth, philosophy, etc.). My dissertation argues that “soul-leading” (psuchagōgia)—a rare and ambiguous term used to define the innate power of words—resolves the dialogue’s structural tension. (...)
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  5. As três definições de Hípias no Hípias Maior de Platão.Renato Semaniuc Valvassori - 2021 - Em Curso 8:1-9.
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  6. Two Passions in Plato’s Symposium: Diotima’s To Kalon as a Reorientation of Imperialistic Erōs.Mateo Duque - 2019 - In Heather L. Reid & Tony Leyh (eds.), Looking at Beauty to Kalon in Western Greece: Selected Essays from the 2018 Symposium on the Heritage of Western Greece. Parnassos Press-Fonte Aretusa. pp. 95-110.
    In this essay, I propose a reading of two contrasting passions, two kinds of erōs, in the "Symposium." On the one hand, there is the imperialistic desire for conquering and possessing that Alcibiades represents; and on the other hand, there is the productive love of immortal wisdom that Diotima represents. It’s not just what Alcibiades says in the Symposium, but also what he symbolizes. Alcibiades gives a speech in honor of Socrates and of his unrequited love for him, but even (...)
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  7. The Guise of the Beautiful: Symposium 204d ff.Jonathan Fine - 2019 - Phronesis 65 (2):129-152.
    A crux of Plato’s Symposium is how beauty relates to the good. Diotima distinguishes beauty from the good, I show, to explain how erotic pursuits are characteristically ambivalent and opaque. Human beings pursue beauty without knowing why or thinking it good; yet they are rational, if aiming at happiness. Central to this reconstruction is a passage widely taken to show that beauty either coincides with the good or demands disinterested admiration. It shows rather that what one loves as beautiful does (...)
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  8. The Carpenter as a Philosopher Artist: a Critique of Plato's Theory of Mimesis.Ilemobayo John Omogunwa - 2018 - Philosophy Pathways 222 (1).
    Plato’s theory of mimesis is expressed clearly and mainly in Plato’s Republic where he refers to his philosophy of Ideas in his definition of art, by arguing that all arts are imitative in nature. Reality according to him lies with the Idea, and the Form one confronts in this tangible world is a copy of that universal everlasting Idea. He poses that a carpenter’s chair is the result of the idea of chair in his mind, the created chair is once (...)
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  9. The Compass of Beauty: A Search for the Middle.Lars Spuybroek - 2018 - In Maria Voyatzaki (ed.), Architectural Materialisms: Nonhuman Creativity. Edinburgh University Press.
    This chapter is a rethinking of my earlier “The Ages of Beauty” which investigated Charles Hartshorne’s Diagram of Aesthetic Values. The argument is placed in a long history of beauty being considered as the middle between extremes. It slowly develops into a structure not merely of aesthetic experience but of existence itself, making it a competitor of Heidegger’s fourfold.
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  10. The Compass of Beauty: A Search For the Middle.Lars Spuybroek - 2018 - In Maria Voyatzaki (ed.), Architectural Materialisms: Nonhuman Creativity. Edinburgh University Press. pp. 176–204.
    This chapter is a rethinking of my earlier “The Ages of Beauty” which investigated Charles Hartshorne’s Diagram of Aesthetic Values. The argument is placed in a long history of beauty being considered as the middle between extremes. It slowly develops into a structure not merely of aesthetic experience but of existence itself, making it an alternative to Heidegger’s fourfold.
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  11. Sun and Lightning: The Visibility of Radiance.Spuybroek Lars - 2016 - In Joke Brouwer, Lars Spuybroek & Sjoerd van Tuinen (eds.), The War of Appearances: Transparency, Opacity, Radiance. V2_Publishing. pp. 98-127.
    A long chapter for The War of Appearances: Transparency, Opacity, Radiance (V2_Publishing, 2016) building on the findings of “Charis and Radiance,” an essay published two years earlier. It discusses the inherent connection between visibility and radiance within the framework of Plato’s sun model as the source of reality. The argument develops a system where transcendent verticality and earthly horizontality together construct an “arena of presence” in which things flood each other with light, absorbing and returning portions of it in a (...)
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  12. Sun and Lightning: The Visibility of Radiance.Lars Spuybroek - 2016 - In Joke Brouwer, Lars Spuybroek & Sjoerd van Tuinen (eds.), The War of Appearances: Transparency, Opacity, Radiance. V2_Publishing. pp. 98-127.
    A long chapter for The War of Appearances: Transparency, Opacity, Radiance (V2_Publishing, 2016) building on the findings of “Charis and Radiance,” an essay published two years earlier. It discusses the inherent connection between visibility and radiance within the framework of Plato’s sun model as the source of reality.
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  13. Contemplation and self-mastery in Plato's Phaedrus.Suzanne Obdrzalek - 2012 - Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy 42:77-107.
    This chapter examines Plato's moral psychology in the Phaedrus. It argues against interpreters such as Burnyeat and Nussbaum that Plato's treatment of the soul is increasingly pessimistic: reason's desire to contemplate is at odds with its obligation to rule the soul, and psychic harmony can only be secured by violently suppressing the lower parts of the soul.
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  14. The Death of Painting (After Plato).Ryan Drake - 2011 - Research in Phenomenology 41 (1):23-44.
    Whereas the entrance of the monochrome into modern art has typically been understood in light of movements in contemporary art and aesthetic theory following in its wake, this essay seeks to understand the motivations for, and the effect of, the monochrome in the work of Aleksandr Rodchenko in 1921 in reference to Plato's analysis of pure pleasure and absolute beauty in the Philebus . I argue that Rodchenko and Plato were motivated by a shared project to contend with the aesthetic (...)
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  15. Moral Transformation and the Love of Beauty in Plato’s Symposium.Suzanne Obdrzalek - 2010 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 48 (4):415-444.
    This paper defends an intellectualist interpretation of Diotima’s speech in Plato’s Symposium. I argue that Diotima’s purpose, in discussing the lower lovers, is to critique their erōs as aimed at a goal it can never secure, immortality, and as focused on an inferior object, themselves. By contrast, in loving the form of beauty, the philosopher gains a mortal sort of completion; in turning outside of himself, he also ceases to be preoccupied by his own incompleteness.
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  16. Why Eros?Suzanne Obdrzalek - 1992 - In Richard Kraut (ed.), The Cambridge Companion to Plato. New York, NY, USA: Cambridge University Press.
    One of the ways in which Plato has captured the popular imagination is with the claim that the philosopher can feel erôs, passionate love, for the objects of knowledge. Why should Plato make this claim? In this chapter, I explore Plato’s treatment of philosophical erôs along three dimensions. First, I consider the source of philosophical erôs. I argue that it is grounded in our mortality and imperfection, which give rise to a desire for immortality and the immortal. Second, I turn (...)
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