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  1. Empathy, honour, and the apprenticeship of violence: rudiments of a psychohistorical critique of the individualistic science of evil.Nicolas J. Bullot - 2020 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 19 (4):821-845.
    Research seeking to explain the perpetration of violence and atrocities by humans against other humans offers both social and individualistic explanations, which differ namely in the roles attributed to empathy. Prominent social models suggest that some manifestations of inter-human violence are caused by parochial attitudes and obedience reinforced by within-group empathy. Individualistic explanations of violence, by contrast, posit that stable intra-individual characteristics of the brain and personality of some individuals lead them to commit violence and atrocities. An individualistic explanation argues (...)
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  • Abstract Society in the Time of Plague.Adam Chmielewski - 2020 - Philosophy of the Social Sciences 50 (4):366-380.
    The global lockdown following the outbreak of the COVID-19 pandemic is likely to generate all sorts of consequences: psychological, social, economic, and political. To hypothesize about what will emerge from the present situation is at this point both premature and impossible. The impossibility comes primarily from the gravity and vastness of this emergency and from the lack of intellectual resources to deal with the challenge. At the same time, however, the need to get a grasp of the condition in which (...)
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  • Love Actually: Law and the Moral Psychology of Forgiveness.Alan Norrie - 2018 - Journal of Critical Realism 17 (4):390-407.
    ABSTRACTLove is the basis for a moral psychology of forgiveness. I argue for an account of love based on Roy Bhaskar's conception of its five circles, and of the ethical nature of human beings as concrete universals/singulars. Linking this to work of ‘The Forgiveness Project’, I argue that forgiveness can be understood metaphysically in terms of its relation to love of self, of the other, of the relation of self and other, of self, other and the wider community, and of (...)
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  • Comprehending "Evil": Challenges for Law and Policy.Douglas Klusmeyer & Astri Suhrke - 2002 - Ethics and International Affairs 16 (1):27-42.
    The article focuses on the Bush Administration's attempts to frame its policy around this term in the current campaign against terrorism, and recent uses of the term in the growing literature on war crimes, genocide, and domestic repression.
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  • Genocide as Social Control.Bradley Campbell - 2009 - Sociological Theory 27 (2):150-172.
    Genocide is defined here as organized and unilateral mass killing on the basis of ethnicity. While some have focused on genocide as a type of deviance, most genocide is also social control — a response to behavior itself defined as deviant. As such, it can be explained as a part of a general theory of social control. Black's theories of social control explain the handling of conflicts with their social geometry — that is, with the social characteristics of those involved (...)
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  • Evil and Moral Detachment: Further Reflections on The Mirror Thesis.Alfred Archer - 2016 - International Journal of Philosophical Studies 24 (2):201-218.
    A commonly accepted claim by philosophers investigating the nature of evil is that the evil person is, in some way, the mirror image of the moral saint. In this paper I will defend a new version of this thesis. I will argue that both the moral saint and the morally evil person are characterized by a lack of conflict between moral and non-moral concerns. However, while the saint achieves this unity through a reconciliation of the two, the evil person does (...)
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  • Ethical Reconstruction of Citizenship: A Proposal Between the Intimate Self and the Public Sphere.Antonio Bernal Guerrero, Vicent Gozálvez Pérez & Marta Burguet Arfelis - 2019 - Journal of Moral Education 48 (4):483-498.
    ABSTRACTWhen, in societies today, civic commitment decreases, there is a call for the need to strengthen citizenship education, identified uniquely with its public dimension and, on the other hand, the requirement for character education has been advocated, which is a cultivator of the most strictly private dimension. Setting out from the recognition of the new social conditions, mediated by the phenomenon of globalisation and of the place that people have in these new contexts, we ask ourselves about the new profile (...)
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  • Torture, Evil and Moral Development.Darcia Narvaez - 2015 - Journal of Moral Education 44 (1):1-16.
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  • Obligations in the Anthropocene.Peter D. Burdon - forthcoming - Law and Critique.
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  • Wurzeln menschlichen Widerstands gegen Tierrechte: Psychologische und Konzeptuelle Blockaden.Steven James Bartlett - 2003 - Http://Www.Simorgh.De/Animallaw/Bartlett_33-67.Pdf.
    A combined psychological-epistemological study of the human blocks that stand in the way of the recognition of the sentience and legal rights of non-human animals. This is a German translation of the original paper, "Roots of Human Resistance to Animal Rights: Psychological and Conceptual Blocks," published by the Lewis and Clark law journal, Animal Rights, in 2002.
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  • Toward a Critical-Sentimental Orientation in Human Rights Education.Michalinos Zembylas - 2016 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 48 (11).
    This paper addresses one of the challenges in human rights education concerning the conceptualization of a pedagogical orientation that avoids both the pitfalls of a purely juridical address and a ‘cheap sentimental’ approach. The paper uses as its point of departure Richard Rorty’s key intervention on human rights discourse and argues that a more critical orientation of Rorty’s proposal on ‘sentimental education’ has important implications for HRE. This orientation is not limited to perspectives such as Rorty’s voyeuristic approach to sentimentality, (...)
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  • Solidarity in Dark Times: Arendt and Gadamer on the Politics of Appearance.Jennifer Gaffney - 2018 - Philosophy Compass 13 (12):e12554.
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  • Interruptions: Cultivating Truth-Telling as Resistance with Pre-Service Teachers.Cara E. Furman - 2020 - Studies in Philosophy and Education 39 (1):1-17.
    As ethical agents, teachers regularly must decide whether compliance to rules and norms is in the best interest of their students. Yet, teachers in the United States are educated to be passively obedient. In this paper, I argue that part of pre-service teacher education ought to learn ways of resisting. I describe one approach to verbal resistance, what Michel Foucault calls Truth-Telling. Building on a qualitative self-study with pre-service teachers, I explain how a form of team-teaching called Interruptions can promote (...)
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  • The Question of Evil and Feminist Legal Scholarship.Thérèse Murphy & Noel Whitty - 2006 - Feminist Legal Studies 14 (1):1-26.
    In this article, we argue that feminist legal scholars should engage directly and explicitly with the question of evil. Part I summarises key facts surrounding the prosecution and life-long imprisonment of Myra Hindley, one of a tiny number of women involved in multiple killings of children in recent British history. Part II reviews a range of commentaries on Hindley, noting in particular the repeated use of two narratives: the first of these insists that Hindley is an icon of female evil; (...)
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  • The Ethics of Humanistic Scholarship: On Knowledge and Acknowledgement.Isaac Nevo - 2013 - Journal of the Philosophy of History 7 (3):266-298.
    My aim in this paper is to characterize the professional good served by the humanities as various academic disciplines, particularly in relation to the general academic good, namely, the pursuit of knowledge in theoretical and scholarly research, and to evaluate the public and ethical dimension of that professional good and the constraints it imposes upon practitioners. My argument will be that the humanities aim at both knowledge of objective facts and acknowledgement of the human status of their subject matter, and (...)
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  • Book Review: Bat-Ami Bar On. The Subject of Violence: Arendtean Exercises in Understanding. Lanham, Md.: Rowman and Littlefield, 2002. [REVIEW]Margaret A. McLaren - 2003 - Hypatia 18 (2):205-208.
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  • Moral Theory in the Fiction of Isabelle de Charrière: The Case of Three Women.Emma Rooksby - 2005 - Hypatia 20 (1):1-20.
    Not all those who write philosophy are recognized as philosophers. In this paper I argue that Dutch writer Isabelle de Charrière, usually known as a novelist, is actually engaged in doing moral philosophy. In the second half of the eighteenth century, Charrière wrote novels about characters who endorsed moral theories and commitments. Her novels track the dilemmas that these characters face in trying to live according their moral theories and commitments. I consider the case for treating fiction as philosophically valuable, (...)
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  • Introduction: Special Issue on “Feminist Philosophy and the Problem of Evil”.Robin May Schott - 2003 - Hypatia 18 (1):1-9.
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  • Introduction: Special Issue on "Feminist Philosophy and the Problem of Evil".Robin May Schott - 2003 - Hypatia 18 (1):1-9.
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  • Narratives of Responsibility and Agency: Reading Margaret Walker's Moral Understandings.Lorraine Code - 2002 - Hypatia 17 (1):156-173.
    Naturalized moral epistemology eschews practices of assuming to know a priori the nature of situations and experiences that require moral deliberation. Thus it promises to close a gap between formal ethical theories and circumstances where people need guidelines for action. Yet according experience so central a place in inquiry risks “naturalizing” it, treating it as incontestable, separating its moral and political dimensions. This essay discusses these issues with reference to Margaret Walker's Moral understandings.
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  • Uncoupling Meat From Animal Slaughter and Its Impacts on Human-Animal Relationships.Marina Sucha Heidemann, Carla Forte Maiolino Molento, Germano Glufk Reis & Clive Julian Christie Phillips - 2020 - Frontiers in Psychology 11.
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  • Punishing Organized Crime Leaders for the Crimes of Their Subordinates.Shachar Eldar - 2010 - Criminal Law and Philosophy 4 (2):183-196.
    The intuition holding that an organized crime leader should be punished more severely than a subordinate who directly commits an offence is commonly reflected in legal literature. However, positing a direct relationship between the severity of punishment and the level of seniority within an organizational hierarchy represents a departure from a more general idea found in much of the substantive criminal law writings: that the severity of punishment increases the closer the proximity to the physical commission of the offence. This (...)
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  • Confronting Political Responsibility: The Problem of Acknowledgment.Jacob Schiff - 2008 - Hypatia 23 (3):pp. 99-117.
    Iris Marion Young articulated a social connection model of responsibility to conceptualize political responsibility for structural injustice. Schiff argues that actually confronting our responsibility is problematic: the pervasiveness of structural injustice makes it difficult to acknowledge as a problem, while distances between sufferers and contributors complicate our acknowledgment of social connection. These problems are exacerbated by thoughtlessness, bad faith, and misrecognition. Narrative can facilitate the acknowledgment necessary for us to confront our political responsibility.
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  • Empty, Useless, and Dangerous? Recent Kantian Replies to the Empty Formalism Objection.Fabian Freyenhagen - 2011 - Hegel Bulletin 32 (1-2):163-186.
    Like two heavyweight boxers exchanging punches, but neither landing the knock-out blow, Kantians and Hegelians seem to be in a stand-off on what in contemporary parlance is known as the Empty Formalism Objection. Kant's ethics is charged with being merely formal and thereby failing to provide the kind of specific guidance that any defensible ethical system should have the resources to provide. Hegel is often credited with having formulated this objection in its most incisive way, and a wealth of Kantian (...)
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  • Considering Capital Punishment as a Human Interaction.Christopher Bennett - 2013 - Criminal Law and Philosophy 7 (2):367-382.
    This paper contributes to the normative debate over capital punishment by looking at whether the role of executioner is one in which it is possible and proper to take pride. The answer to the latter question turns on the kind of justification the agent can give for what she does in carrying out the role. So our inquiry concerns whether the justifications available to an executioner could provide him with the kind of justification necessary for him to take pride in (...)
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  • Negotiating the Inhuman: Bakhtin, Materiality and the Instrumentalization of Climate Change.Angela Last - 2013 - Theory, Culture and Society 30 (2):60-83.
    The article argues that the work of literary theorist Mikhail M. Bakhtin presents a starting point for thinking about the instrumentalization of climate change. Bakhtin’s conceptualization of human–world relationships, encapsulated in the concept of ‘cosmic terror’, places a strong focus on our perception of the ‘inhuman’. Suggesting a link between the perceived alienness and instability of the world and in the exploitation of the resulting fear of change by political and religious forces, Bakhtin asserts that the latter can only be (...)
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  • Ethics and Education as Practices of Freedom.Pedro Tabensky - forthcoming - Educational Philosophy and Theory:1-10.
    On the one hand, according to Richard Rorty, Paulo Freire and others, education is the practice of freedom. On the other hand, according to Michael Foucault, Mary Midgley and others, ethics is the...
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  • Karl Marx and Hannah Arendt on the Jewish Question: Political Theology as a Critique.Artemy Magun - 2012 - Continental Philosophy Review 45 (4):545-568.
    The article is dedicated to the politico-theological critique of Judaism from the position of Christianity. It shows the affinity of Marx’s early critique of liberal state and of Hannah Arendt’s criticism of formal legalistic thinking in the contemporary judicial treatment of Nazism (and of similar international political crimes). Marx’s critique of nation-state finds its unlikely continuation in Arendt’s critique of international law. The politico-theological argument is explicit in Marx and implicit in Arendt, but both develop the Hegelian criticism of liberal (...)
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  • Of Rebels and Disobedients: Reflections on Arendt, Race, Lawbreaking.Ayça Çubukçu - forthcoming - Law and Critique.
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  • Reconsidering Instrumental Corporate Social Responsibility Through the Mafia Metaphor.Jean-Pascal Gond, Guido Palazzo & Kunal Basu - 2009 - Business Ethics Quarterly 19 (1):57-85.
    The purpose of this paper is to critically evaluate the instrumental perspective on Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) in practice and theory by relying on sociological analyses of a well known organization: the Italian Mafia. Legal businesses might share features of the Mafia, such as the propensity to exploit a governance vacuum in society, a strong organizational identity that demarcates the inside from the outside, and an extreme profit motive. Instrumental CSR practices have the power to accelerate a firm’s transition to (...)
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  • A Problem From Washington: Samantha Power Enters the Foreign Policy Bureaucracy.Michael Barnett - 2020 - Ethics and International Affairs 34 (2):241-254.
    In her new memoir, The Education of an Idealist, Samantha Power reflects on her eight years in the Obama administration. Although she claims that the experience did little to change her views, there is a considerable disjuncture between her point of view in her award-winning earlier book “A Problem from Hell,” in which she criticizes U.S. officials for not doing the right thing, and her point of view in The Education of an Idealist, in which she defends indifference of U.S. (...)
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  • The Ultramodern Condition: On the Phenomenology of the Shadow as Transgression. [REVIEW]Bruce A. Arrigo - 2012 - Human Studies 35 (3):429-444.
    The ultramodern condition represents the "third wave" in postmodernist-inspired philosophy and cultural practice. Two of ultramodernism's critical theoretical components are the human/social forces, flows, and assemblages that sustain transgression; and the human/social intensities, fluctuations, and thresholds that make transcendence possible as both will and way. In the ultramodern age, then, transcendence is about overcoming and transforming the conditions (i.e., forces, flows, and assemblages) that co-produce harm-generating (i.e., transgressive) tendencies. This manuscript problematizes transgression by way of ultramodern theory. This critical investigation (...)
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  • Confessions Without Guilt: Public Confessions of State Violence in Turkey.Yeşim Yaprak Yıldız & Patrick Baert - forthcoming - Theory and Society.
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  • At Home and Not at Home in the National Museum: On Nostalgia and Education.SunInn Yun - forthcoming - Educational Philosophy and Theory:1-10.
    This paper discusses the educational significance of the national museum as a reminder of the nature of home and its relation to nostalgia. I contextualise the sense of home in various ways. First,...
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  • Dangerous and Severe Personality Disorder: An Ethical Concept?Sally Glen - 2005 - Nursing Philosophy 6 (2):98-105.
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  • Ethical Blindness.Guido Palazzo, Franciska Krings & Ulrich Hoffrage - 2012 - Journal of Business Ethics 109 (3):323-338.
    Many models of (un)ethical decision making assume that people decide rationally and are in principle able to evaluate their decisions from a moral point of view. However, people might behave unethically without being aware of it. They are ethically blind. Adopting a sensemaking approach, we argue that ethical blindness results from a complex interplay between individual sensemaking activities and context factors.
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  • Deadly Medicines and Organised Crime: How Big Pharma Has Corrupted Healthcare by Peter C. Gøtzsche.Henry Bauer - 2014 - Journal of Scientific Exploration 28 (2).
    Prescription drugs are the third leading cause of death in Europe and the USA, exceeded only by heart disease and cancer. Readers encounter the above-quoted assertion on page 1 of this book, following Forewords vouching for the trustworthiness of the book and its author; those Forewords are by former editors of the British Medical Journal and JAMA. The pharmaceutical industry, "Big Pharma," is directly and also indirectly responsible for this unacceptable death rate. The industry's behavior, fully documented here, is shown (...)
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  • Researching Professional Biographies of Educational Professionals in New Dark Times.Belinda C. Hughes, Steven J. Courtney & Helen M. Gunter - 2020 - British Journal of Educational Studies 68 (3):275-293.
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  • Untrol: Post-Truth and the New Normal of Post-Normal Science.Katharine N. Farrell - 2020 - Social Epistemology 34 (4):330-345.
    The idea that there exists a natural relationship between intellectual freedom, legitimate political authority and enjoyment of a dignified life was central to the European Enlightenment and to the...
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  • Narratives of Responsibility and Agency: Reading Margaret Walker's Moral Understandings.Lorraine Code - 2002 - Hypatia 17 (1):156-173.
    Naturalized moral epistemology eschews practices of assuming to know a priori the nature of situations and experiences that require moral deliberation. Thus it promises to close a gap between formal ethical theories and circumstances where people need guidelines for action. Yet according experience so central a place in inquiry risks "naturalizing" it, treating it as incontestable, separating its moral and political dimensions. This essay discusses these issues with reference to Margaret Walker's Moral understandings.
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  • Banal Evil and Useless Knowledge: Hannah Arendt and Charlotte Delbo on Evil After the Holocaust.Jennifer L. Geddes - 2003 - Hypatia 18 (1):104-115.
    : Hannah Arendt's and Charlotte Delbo's writings about the Holocaust trouble our preconceptions about those who do evil and those who suffer evil. Their jarring terms "banal evil" and "useless knowledge" point to limitations and temptations facing scholars of evil. While Arendt helps us to resist the temptation to mythologize evil, Delbo helps us to resist the temptation to domesticate suffering.
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  • Epistemologies of Discomfort: What Military-Family Anti-War Activists Can Teach Us About Knowledge of Violence.Shari Stone-Mediatore - 2010 - Studies in Social Justice 4 (1):25-45.
    This paper examines the particular relevance of feminist critiques of epistemic authority in contexts of institutionalized violence. Reading feminist criticism of “experts” together with theorists of institutionalized violence, Stone-Mediatore argues that typical expert modes of thinking are incapable of rigorous knowledge of institutionalized violence because such knowledge requires a distinctive kind of thinking-within-discomfort for which conventionally trained experts are ill-suited. The author demonstrates the limitations of “expert” modes of thinking with reference to writings on the Iraq war by Michael Ignatieff (...)
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  • Mass Violence and the Continuum of Destruction: A study of C. P. Taylor’s Good.James Hardie-Bick - 2020 - International Journal for the Semiotics of Law - Revue Internationale de Sémiotique Juridique 33 (2):477-495.
    There are important studies that have directly focused on how, in times of conflict, it is possible for previously law abiding people to commit the most atrocious acts of cruelty and violence. The work of Erich Fromm, Hannah Arendt, Zygmunt Bauman and Ernest Becker have all contemplated the driving force of aggression and mass violence to further our understanding of how people are capable of engaging in extreme forms of cruelty and violence. This paper specifically addresses these issues by focusing (...)
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  • Holes of Oblivion: The Banality of Radical Evil.Peg Birmingham - 2003 - Hypatia 18 (1):80-103.
    : This essay offers a reflection on Arendt's notion of radical evil, arguing that her later understanding of the banality of evil is already at work in her earlier reflections on the nature of radical evil as banal, and furthermore, that Arendt's understanding of the "banality of radical evil" has its source in the very event that offers a possible remedy to it, namely, the event of natality. Kristeva's recent work (2001) on Arendt is important to this proposal insofar as (...)
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  • Action and the Problem of Evil.Heine A. Holmen - 2015 - International Journal of Philosophy and Theology 76 (4):335-351.
    Most contemporary action theorists deny the possible existence of intentionally evil actions or diabolic agency. The reason for this is a normative interpretation of agency that appears to be motivated by action theoretic concerns, where agents are conceived as necessarily acting sub specie bonie or under ‘the guise of the good’. I argue that there is nothing in human agency to motivate this view and that diabolic evil is not at odds with inherent features of our nature.
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  • Propranolol and the Prevention of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder: Is It Wrong to Erase the “Sting” of Bad Memories?Michael Henry, Jennifer R. Fishman & Stuart J. Youngner - 2007 - American Journal of Bioethics 7 (9):12 – 20.
    The National Institute of Mental Health (Bethesda, MD) reports that approximately 5.2 million Americans experience post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) each year. PTSD can be severely debilitating and diminish quality of life for patients and those who care for them. Studies have indicated that propranolol, a beta-blocker, reduces consolidation of emotional memory. When administered immediately after a psychic trauma, it is efficacious as a prophylactic for PTSD. Use of such memory-altering drugs raises important ethical concerns, including some futuristic dystopias put forth (...)
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  • Value Pluralism, Realism and Pessimism.Kei Hiruta - forthcoming - Res Publica:1-18.
    Value pluralists see themselves as philosophical grown-ups. They profess to face reality as it is and accept resultant pessimism, while criticising their monist rivals for holding on to the naïve idea that the right, the good and the beautiful are ultimately harmonisable with each other. The aim of this essay is to challenge this self-image of value pluralists. Notwithstanding its usefulness as a means of subverting monist dominance, I argue that the self-image has the downside of obscuring various theoretical positions (...)
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  • Arendt on Language and Lying in Politics: Her Insights Applied to the ‘War on Terror’ and the U.S. Occupation of Iraq".Gail Presbey - 2008 - peace studies journal 1 (1):32-62.
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  • Reading Nietzsche in the Wake Of the 2008-09 War on Gaza.C. Heike Schotten - 2012 - Philosophy in the Contemporary World 19 (1):67-82.
    This paper argues for a psychological understanding of Nietzsche's categories of master and slave morality. Disentangling Nietzsche's parallel discourses of strength, superiority, and spirituality in the first essay of On the Genealogy of Morals, I argue that master and slave morality are better understood as ethical practices of the self than surrogates for either a binary classification of strength and weakness or a political demarcation of oppressor and oppressed. In doing so, I offer an application of this analysis to the (...)
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  • The Knowledge of People Disappeared During Argentina’s Military Rule.Ram Natarajan - 2018 - Human Studies 41 (2):293-311.
    Antonio Ruiz is an officer who took part in the Argentine 1976–1983 military rule and disappeared the body of a tortured woman. My aim is to offer an ethnographic account of the embodiment of the knowledge of bodies—the local moral worlds in which the officer Antonio and his wife lived and legitimated state violence by imagining themselves as victims, and Antonio subsequently followed his commander’s order and buried the body of a tortured woman. The armed forces provided soldiers of the (...)
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