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  1. The Ethics of Cloud Computing.Boudewijn de Bruin & Luciano Floridi - 2017 - Science and Engineering Ethics 23 (1):21-39.
    Cloud computing is rapidly gaining traction in business. It offers businesses online services on demand (such as Gmail, iCloud and Salesforce) and allows them to cut costs on hardware and IT support. This is the first paper in business ethics dealing with this new technology. It analyzes the informational duties of hosting companies that own and operate cloud computing datacenters (e.g., Amazon). It considers the cloud services providers leasing ‘space in the cloud’ from hosting companies (e.g, Dropbox, Salesforce). And it (...)
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  • Gruesome Freedom: The Moral Limits of Non-Constraint.John Lawless - 2018 - Philosophers' Imprint 18.
    Many philosophers conceive of freedom as non-interference. Such conceptions unify two core commitments. First, they associate freedom with non-constraint. And second, they take seriously a distinction between the interpersonal and the non-personal. As a result, they focus our attention exclusively on constraints attributable to other people’s choices – that is, on interference. I argue that these commitments manifest two distinct concerns: first, for a wide range of options; and second, for other people’s respect. However, construing freedom as non-interference unifies these (...)
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  • Agency in Social Context.John Lawless - 2017 - Res Philosophica 94 (4):471-498.
    Many political philosophers argue that interference threatens a person’s agency. And they cast political freedom in opposition to interpersonal threats to agency, as non-interference. I argue that this approach relies on an inapt model of agency, crucial aspects of which emerge from our relationships with other people. Such relationships involve complex patterns of vulnerability and subjection, essential to our constitution as particular kinds of agents: as owners of property, as members of families, and as participants in a market for labor. (...)
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  • Heteronomous Citizenship: Civic Virtue and the Chains of Autonomy.Lucas Swaine - 2010 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 42 (1):73-93.
    In this article, I distinguish personal autonomy from heteronomy, and consider whether autonomy provides a suitable basis for liberalism. I argue that liberal government should not promote autonomy in all its citizens, on the grounds that not all members of liberal democracies require autonomy for a good life. I then outline an alternative option that I call a liberalism of conscience, describing how it better respects heteronomous citizens. I subsequently clarify how a liberalism of conscience is different than, and superior (...)
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  • Education for Critical Thinking: Can It Be Non‐Indoctrinative?Stefaan E. Cuypers & Ishtiyaque Haji - 2006 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 38 (6):723–743.
    An ideal of education is to ensure that our children develop into autonomous critical thinkers. The ‘indoctrination objection’, however, calls into question whether education, aimed at cultivating autonomous critical thinkers, is possible. The core of the concern is that since the young child lacks even modest capacities for assessing reasons, the constituent components of critical thinking have to be indoctrinated if there is to be any hope of the child's attaining the ideal. Our primary objective is to defuse this objection. (...)
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  • The Concept of Voluntary Consent.Robert M. Nelson, Tom Beauchamp, Victoria A. Miller, William Reynolds, Richard F. Ittenbach & Mary Frances Luce - 2011 - American Journal of Bioethics 11 (8):6-16.
    Our primary focus is on analysis of the concept of voluntariness, with a secondary focus on the implications of our analysis for the concept and the requirements of voluntary informed consent. We propose that two necessary and jointly sufficient conditions must be satisfied for an action to be voluntary: intentionality, and substantial freedom from controlling influences. We reject authenticity as a necessary condition of voluntary action, and we note that constraining situations may or may not undermine voluntariness, depending on the (...)
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  • The Politics of Self‐Respect: A Feminist Perspective.Diana T. Meyers - 1986 - Hypatia 1 (1):83 - 100.
    Recent liberal moral and political philosophy has placed great emphasis on the good of self-respect. But it is not always evident what is involved in self-respect, nor is it evident how societies can promote it. Assuming that self-respect is highly desirable, I begin by considering how people can live in a self-respecting fashion, and I argue that autonomous envisaging and fulfillment of one's own life plans is necessary for self-respect. I next turn to the question of how societal implementation of (...)
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  • Governing [Through] Autonomy. The Moral and Legal Limits of “Soft Paternalism”.Bijan Fateh-Moghadam & Thomas Gutmann - 2014 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 17 (3):383-397.
    Legal restrictions of the right to self-determination increasingly pretend to be compatible with the liberal concept of autonomy: they act upon a ‘soft’ or autonomy-orientated paternalistic rationale. Conventional liberal critique of paternalism turns out to be insensitive to the intricate normative problems following from ‘soft’ or ‘libertarian’ paternalism. In fact, these autonomy-oriented forms of paternalism could actually be even more problematic and may infringe liberty rights even more intensely than hard paternalistic regulation. This paper contributes to the systematic differentiation of (...)
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  • Relational Selves, Personal Autonomy and Oppression.T. L. Zutlevics - 2002 - Philosophia 29 (1-4):423-436.
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  • Xin and Moral Failure: Reflections on Mencius' Moral Psychologyand Moral Failure: Reflections on Mencius' Moral Psychology.A. S. Cua - 2001 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 1 (1):31-53.
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  • The Rights Approach to Mental Illness.Tom Campbell - 1984 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Lectures 18:221-253.
    The concept of rights is now so dominant in the language of politics that it is becoming difficult to identify its use with any particular approach to the solution of social problems or to gain a clear picture of its significance, its advantages and its disadvantages as a way of conceptualizing and resolving contentious political issues. None the less there is a perceptible shift towards an emphasis on rights in contemporary politics which many welcome and encourage and others question and (...)
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  • Autonomy in R. S. Peters' Educational Theory.Stefaan E. Cuypers - 2009 - Philosophy of Education 43 (Supplement s1):189-207.
    Autonomy is, among other things, an actual psychological condition, a capacity that can be developed, and an educational ideal. This paper contextualises, analyses, criticises and extends the theory of Richard S. Peters on these three aspects of autonomy.
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  • Freedom Under an Indifferent Dictator: Intentionality and Responsibility.Frank Hindriks - 2017 - Economics and Philosophy 33 (1):25-41.
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  • 'I Did It My Way': Some Thoughts on Autonomy.Richard Norman - 1994 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 28 (1):25–34.
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  • Buddhism and Autonomy‐Facilitating Education.Jeffrey Morgan - 2013 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 47 (4):509-523.
    This article argues that Buddhists can consistently support autonomy as an educational ideal. The article defines autonomy as a matter of thinking and acting according to principles that one has oneself endorsed, showing the relationship between this ideal and the possession of an enduring self. Three central Buddhist doctrines of conditioned arising, impermanence and anatman are examined, showing a prima facie conflict between autonomy and Buddhist philosophy. Drawing on the ‘two truths’ theory of Nagarjuna, it is then shown that the (...)
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  • The 'Right to Education' and Compulsory Schooling.Graham Haydon - 1977 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 9 (1):1–15.
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  • Two Competing Theories of Personal Autonomy: A Critique of the Liberal Rationalist Attack on Progressivism.J. C. Walker - 1981 - Educational Theory 31 (3-4):285-306.
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  • The ‘Right to Education’ and Compulsory Schooling.Graham Haydon - 1977 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 9 (1):1-15.
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  • Parallels in Preschoolers' and Adults' Judgments About Ownership Rights and Bodily Rights.Julia W. Van de Vondervoort & Ori Friedman - 2015 - Cognitive Science 39 (1):184-198.
    Understanding ownership rights is necessary for socially appropriate behavior. We provide evidence that preschoolers' and adults' judgments of ownership rights are related to their judgments of bodily rights. Four-year-olds and adults evaluated the acceptability of harmless actions targeting owned property and body parts. At both ages, evaluations did not vary for owned property or body parts. Instead, evaluations were influenced by two other manipulations—whether the target belonged to the agent or another person, and whether that other person approved of the (...)
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