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  1. Private Education, Positional Goods, and the Arms Race Problem.Daniel Halliday - 2016 - Politics, Philosophy and Economics 15 (2):150-169.
    This article defends the view that markets in education need to be restricted, in light of the problem posed by what I call the ‘educational arms race’. Markets in education have a tendency to distort an important balance between education’s role as a gatekeeper – its ‘screening’ function – and its role in helping children develop as part of a preparation for adult life. This tendency is not merely a contingent fact about markets: It can be traced to ways in (...)
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  • Social Class, Merit and Equality of Opportunity in Education.Gideon Elford - 2016 - Res Publica 22 (3):267-284.
    The paper offers to substantiate a claim about the so-called Meritocratic Conception of how educational opportunities ought to be distributed. Such a conception holds an individual’s prospects for educational achievement may be a function of that individual’s talent or effort levels but should not be influenced by their social class background. The paper highlights the internal tension in the Meritocratic Conception between on the one hand a prohibition on the influence of social class on educational opportunities and on the other (...)
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  • Distributive Justice in Education and Conflicting Interests: Not (Remotely) as Bad as You Think.Tammy Harel Ben-Shahar - 2015 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 49 (4):491-509.
    The importance of education and its profound effect on people's life make it a central issue in discussions of distributive justice. However, promoting distributive justice in education comes at a price: prioritising the education of some, as is often entailed by the principles of justice, inevitably has negative effects on the education of others. As a result, all theories of distributive justice in education face the challenge of balancing their requirements with conflicting interests. This article aims to contribute to developing (...)
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  • Ends, Principles, and Causal Explanation in Educational Justice.Jenn Dum - 2017 - Ethics and Education 12 (2):184-200.
    Many principles characterize educational justice in terms of the relationship between educational inputs, outputs and distributive standards. Such principles depend upon the causal pathway view of education. It is implicit in this view that the causally effective aspects of education can be understood as separate from the normative aspects of education. Yet this view relies on an impossible division of labor between empirical and normative work in educational research: it treats the causal roles that are understood and explained objectively through (...)
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  • Inadequate for Democracy: How (Not) to Distribute Education.Alexandra Oprea - forthcoming - Politics, Philosophy and Economics:1470594X2092466.
    There is widespread agreement among philosophers and legal scholars that the distribution of educational resources in the US is unjust, but little agreement about why. An increasingly prominent view posits a sufficientarian standard based on the requirements of democratic citizenship. This view, which I refer to as democratic sufficientarianism, argues that inequalities in educational resources or opportunities above the threshold required for democratic citizenship are morally unobjectionable if and only if all children are provided with an education sufficient to meet (...)
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  • Poverty, Partiality, and the Purchase of Expensive Education.Christopher Freiman - 2017 - Politics, Philosophy and Economics 16 (1):25-46.
    Prioritarianism doesn’t value equality as such – any reason to equalize is due to the benefits for the worse off. But some argue that prioritarianism and egalitarianism coincide in their implications for the distribution of education: Equalizing educational opportunities improves the socioeconomic opportunities of the worse off. More specifically, a system that prohibits parents from making differential private educational expenditures would result in greater gains to the worse off than a system that permits these expenditures, all else equal. This article (...)
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  • Educational Adequacy and Educational Equality: A Merging Proposal.Fernando de los Santos Menéndez - forthcoming - Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy:1-22.
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  • From Rawlsian Autonomy to Sufficient Opportunity in Education.Liam Shields - 2015 - Politics, Philosophy and Economics 14 (1):53-66.
    Equality of Opportunity is widely thought of as the normative ideal most relevant to the design of educational institutions. One widely discussed interpretation of this ideal is Rawls' principle of Fair Equality of Opportunity. In this paper I argue that theories, like Rawls, that give priority to the achievement of individual autonomy, are committed to giving that same priority to a principle of sufficient opportunity. Thus, the Rawlsian's primary focus when designing educational institutions should be on sufficiency and not equality. (...)
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  • The Prospects for Sufficientarianism.Liam Shields - 2012 - Utilitas 24 (1):101-117.
    Principles of sufficiency are widely discussed in debates about distributive ethics. However, critics have argued that sufficiency principles are vulnerable to important objections. This paper seeks to clarify the main claims of sufficiency principles and to examine whether they have something distinctive and plausible to offer. The paper argues that sufficiency principles must claim that we have weighty reasons to secure enough and that once enough is secured the nature of our reasons to secure further benefits shifts. Having characterized sufficientarianism (...)
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  • Adequacy in Education and Normative School Choice.Adelin Dumitru - 2018 - Studies in Philosophy and Education 37 (2):123-146.
    In this paper I make a contribution to three distinct, but deeply interwoven subjects. Firstly, I argue that, at the level of ideal theory, the distribution of educational goods should follow a sufficientarian pattern and that the evaluative space of children’s advantage should be inspired by the capability approach. Secondly, the paper is delving into the more policy-oriented debates on the desirability of school choice. I argue that, given the non-ideal circumstances in which decision makers have to act, giving parents (...)
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  • Introduction: Education and Migration.Julian Culp & Danielle Zwarthoed - 2018 - Journal of Global Ethics 14 (1):5-10.
    This introduction expounds educational problems that arise from transnational migration. It argues that it is high time to critically analyze normative issues of and in education under conditions of globalization because dominant approaches in normative philosophy of education tend to suffer from both a nationalist bias and a sedentary bias. The contributions to this special issue address normative problems pertaining to migration-related education from a variety of ethical and philosophical perspectives, including analytic applied ethics, continental philosophy, care ethics, Hegelian philosophy, (...)
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  • Égalité des Chances Et Justice Scolaire. Une Interprétation de la Conception Égalitariste de la Justice En Éducation.Alexandra Malenfant-Veilleux - 2019 - Dialogue 58 (1):91-105.
    Cet article propose deux arguments principaux. D’abord, que la théorie égalitariste de la justice en éducation non-seulement englobe, mais supporte la théorie suffisantiste, et donc que le débat égalitarisme/suffisantisme — du moins celui qui a cours entre Brighouse et Swift d’une part et Anderson et Satz d’autre part — n’a pas lieu d’être. Ensuite, que l’application qu’opèrent Brighouse et Swift de leur propre théorie est excessive — quant aux choix parentaux et quant à ce qu’ils considèrent comme étant des comportements (...)
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  • Evaluating School Choice Policies: A Response to Harry Brighouse.Johannes Giesinger - 2009 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 43 (4):589-596.
    In his writings on school choice and educational justice, Harry Brighouse presents normative evaluations of various choice systems. This paper responds to Brighouse's claim that it is inadequate to criticise these evaluations with reference to empirical data concerning the effects of school choice.
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  • Justifying Private Schools.John White - 2016 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 50 (4):496-510.
    The paper looks at arguments for and against private schools, first in general and then, at greater length, in their British form. Here it looks first at defences against the charge that private schooling is unfair, discussing on the way problems with equality as an intrinsic value and with instrumental appeals to greater equality, especially in access to university and better jobs. It turns next to charges of social exclusiveness, before looking in more detail at claims about the dangers private (...)
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  • Equality in Education – Why We Must Go All the Way.Tammy Harel Ben-Shahar - 2016 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 19 (1):83-100.
    In this paper I present and defend a highly demanding principle of justice in education that has not been seriously discussed thus far. According to the suggested approach, “all the way equality”, justice in education requires nothing short of equal educational outcome between all individual students. This means not merely between equally able children, or between children from different groups and classes, but rather between all children, regardless of social background, race, sex and ability. This approach may seem implausible at (...)
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  • If You’Re a Luck Egalitarian, How Come You Read Bedtime Stories to Your Children?Shlomi Segall - 2011 - Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 14 (1):23-40.
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  • Admitting a Sense of Superiority: Aggrandized Higher Education Status as an Objection to Educational Inequality.John Fantuzzo - 2018 - Studies in Philosophy and Education 37 (6):579-593.
    Recalling the landmark US Supreme Court case Brown v. Board of Education, the advancement of educational equality is often associated with the reduction of stigmatizing differences in status or “sense of inferiority” engendered by separately and differentially educated citizens. This essay takes up the obverse concern, the sense of superiority sustained by educational inequality, with particular focus on the inequality signaled by higher education status. I contend that the presence of aggrandized HES in a democratic society provides reasons to object (...)
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  • Is Educational Adequacy Adequate for Just Education?Abdullah Almutairi - 2015 - Educational Studies: Journal of the American Educational Studies Association 51 (6):510-524.
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  • Fair Educational Opportunity and the Distribution of Natural Ability: Toward a Prioritarian Principle of Educational Justice.Gina Schouten - 2012 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 46 (3):472-491.
    In this article, I develop and defend a prioritarian principle of justice for the distribution of educational resources. I argue that this principle should be conceptualized as directing educators to confer a general benefit, where that benefit need not be mediated by improved academic outcomes. I go on to argue that it should employ a metric of all-things-considered flourishing over the course of the student's lifetime. Finally, I discuss the relationship between my proposed prioritarian principle and the meritocratic principle that (...)
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  • Philosophy of Education.D. C. Phillips - 2008 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
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