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  1. What is a Text?Adrian Wilson - 2012 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 43 (2):341-358.
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  • The Body as an “Object” of Historical Knowledge.Doug Mann - 1996 - Dialogue 35 (4):753-776.
    Body theory is the work of historians, sociologists, philosophers, and other scholars in the past twenty to twenty-five years that explicitly focuses on the body, especially on sexuality and gender. The body is seen as an ideological surface on which history and politics inscribe their truths. It is, in short, a corporeal epistemology standing in opposition to all the old cognitive epistemologies. Régimes of power are known through the way they oppress, manipulate, and construct the human body. Body theory includes (...)
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  • Oh Death, Where is Thy Sting? Reflections on Dealing with Dying Patients.Erich H. Loewy - 1988 - Journal of Medical Humanities 9 (2):135-142.
    This paper examines the reactions of physicians and other health-professionals when they become involved in decisions about the death of their patients. The way people understand the condition of death has a profound influence on attitudes towards death and dying issues. Four traditional views of death are explored. The problem that physicians have in helping patients die is analyzed. Physicians, in dealing with such patients, must be mindful of their own, and their patients beliefs as well as mindful of the (...)
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  • Review of C. Koopman, Pragmatism as Transition. Historicity and Hope in James, Dewey, and Rorty. [REVIEW]Roberto Frega - 2009 - European Journal of Pragmatism and American Philosophy 1 (1).
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  • “All History is the History of Thought”: Competing British Idealist Historiographies.Colin Tyler - 2020 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 28 (3):573-593.
    Along with utilitarianism, British idealism was the most important philosophical and practical movement in Britain and its Empire during the late-nineteenth and early-twentieth centuries. Even thou...
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  • Can There Be a Credible Philosophy of History?Davit Mosinyan - 2017 - Wisdom 9 (2):43-47.
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  • The Explanation of Action in History.Constantine Sandis - 2006 - Essays in Philosophy 7 (2):12.
    This paper focuses on two conflations which frequently appear within the philosophy of history and other fields concerned with action explanation. The first of these, which I call the Conflating View of Reasons, states that the reasons for which we perform actions are reasons why (those events which are) our actions occur. The second, more general conflation, which I call the Conflating View of Action Explanation, states that whatever explains why an agent performed a certain action explains why (that event (...)
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  • Collingwood, Metaphysics, and Historicism.Giuseppina D'oro - 2002 - Dialogue 41 (1):71.
    RÉSUMÉ: Cet article discute l'idée que la philosophie tardive de Collingwood soit d'orientation historiciste et relativiste. Je soutiens que cette accusation de relativisme historique est basée sur deux erreurs, l'une exégétique et l'autre philosophique. L'erreur exégétique est le résultat de l'hypothèse d'une prétendue «conversion radicale». L'erreur philosophique repose sur la conception selon laquelle il n'y a pas de différences substantielles entre le projet d'une métaphysique descriptive et le projet de la sociologie de la connaissance. L'article essaie de saper à la (...)
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  • Violence as Weakness: In China and Beyond.Kuang-Ming Wu - 2003 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 3 (1):7-28.
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  • Does Reflexivity Separate the Human Sciences From the Natural Sciences?Roger Smith - 2005 - History of the Human Sciences 18 (4):1-25.
    A number of writers have picked out the way knowledge in the human sciences reflexively alters the human subject as what separates these sciences from the natural sciences. Furthermore, they take this reflexivity to be a condition of moral existence. The article sympathetically examines this emphasis on reflexive processes, but it rejects the particular conclusion that the reflexive phenomenon enables us to demarcate the human sciences. The first sections analyse the different meanings that references to reflexivity have in the psychological (...)
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  • Timely Meditations?: Oswald Spengler’s Philosophy of History Reconsidered.Gregory Morgan Swer - 2018 - Prolegomena: Časopis Za Filozofiju 17 (2):137-154.
    This paper argues that the recent renewal of interest in the philosophy of Oswald Spengler, particularly concerning its warnings of the imminent demise of Western Civilisation, is misplaced. Arguments concerning the accuracy of his predictions or cultural analysis have overlooked the necessity of evaluating the coherence of the philosophical system that Spengler used to generate and justify his speculative declarations. Such an evaluation indicates a number of apparent contradictions at the heart of Spengler’s historical model. The attempt to resolve these (...)
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  • Imagination and the Distorting Power of Emotion.Peter Goldie - 2005 - Journal of Consciousness Studies 12 (8-10):127-139.
    _In real life, emotions can distort practical reasoning, typically in ways that it is_ _difficult to realise at the time, or to envisage and plan for in advance. This fea-_ _ture of real life emotional experience raises difficulties for imagining such expe-_ _riences through centrally imagining, or imagining ‘from the inside’. I argue_ _instead for the important psychological role played by another kind of imagin-_ _ing: imagining from an external perspective. This external perspective can draw_ _on the dramatic irony involved (...)
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  • Another Look at the Doctrine of Verstehen.Jane R. Martin - 1969 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 20 (1):53-67.
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  • Concrete Thinking.Kuang-Ming Wu - 2015 - Open Journal of Philosophy 5 (1):73-86.
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  • History, Narrative, and Meaning.Roberto Artigiani - 2007 - Cosmos and History : The Journal of Natural and Social Philosophy 3 (1):33-58.
    Recent developments in the natural sciences make a renewed dialogue with the humanities possible. Previously, humanists resisted transferring scientific paradigms into fields like history, fearing materialism and determinism would deprive experience of its meaning and people of their freedom. At the same time, scientists were realizing that deterministic materialism made understanding phenomena like life virtually impossible. Scientists escaped the irony of describing a nature to which they did not belong by also discovering that their knowledge can never be complete and (...)
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  • The Complicated History of Einfühlung.Magdalena Nowak - 2011 - Argument: Biannual Philosophical Journal 1 (2):301-326.
    The article analyses the history of the Einfühlung concept. Theories of ‘feeling into’ Nature, works of art or feelings and behaviours of other persons by German philosophers of the second half of the nineteenth century Robert and Friedrich Vischer and Theodor Lipps are evoked, as well as similar theory of understanding (Verstehen) by Wilhelm Dilthey and Friedrich Schleiermacher, to which Dilthey refers. The meaning of the term Einfühlung within Edith Stein’s thought is also analysed. Both Einfühlung and Verstehen were criticized (...)
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  • The Curious Case of the Self-Refuting Straw Man: Trafimow and Earp’s Response to Klein (2014).Stan Klein - 2016 - Theory and Psychology 26:549– 556.
    In their critique of Klein (2014a), Trafimow and Earp present two theses. First, they argue that, contra Klein, a well-specified theory is not a necessary condition for successful replication. Second, they contend that even when there is a well-specified theory, replication depends more on auxiliary assumptions than on theory proper. I take issue with both claims, arguing that (a) their first thesis confuses a material conditional (what I said) with a modal claim (T&E’s misreading of what I said), and (b) (...)
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  • Nominalism and History.Cody Franchetti - 2013 - Open Journal of Philosophy 3 (3):401-412.
    The paper focuses on Nominalism in history, its application, and its historiographical implications. By engaging with recent scholarship as well as classic works, a survey of Nominalism’s role in the discipline of history is made; such examination is timely, since it has been done but scantily in a purely historical context. In the light of recent theoretical works, which often display aporias over the nature and method of historical enquiry, the paper offers new considerations on historical theory, which in the (...)
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  • The Unplanned Obsolescence of Psychological Science and an Argument for its Revival.Stan Klein - 2016 - Pyshcology of Consciousness: Theory, Research, and Practice 3:357-379.
    I examine some of the key scientific pre-commitments of modern psychology, and argue that their adoption has the unintended consequence of rendering a purely psychological analysis of mind indistinguishable from a purely biological treatment. And, since these pre-commitments sanction an “authority of the biological”, explanation of phenomena traditionally considered the purview of psychological analysis is fully subsumed under the biological. I next evaluate the epistemic warrant of these pre-commitments and suggest there are good reasons to question their applicability to psychological (...)
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  • Universality and Particularity in the Philosophy of E. B. Bax and R. G. Collingwood.Mark Bevir - 1999 - History of the Human Sciences 12 (3):55-69.
    This article examines the ways in which E. B. Bax and R. G. Collingwood attempted to avoid relativism and irrationalism without postulating a pure and universal reason. Both philosophers were profound historicists who recognized the fundamentally particular nature of the world. Yet they also attempted to retain a universal aspect to thought - Bax through his distinction between the logical and alogical realms, and Collingwood through his doctrine of re-enactment. The article analyses both their metaphysical premises and their philosophies of (...)
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  • Entiteettien kategorioiden onttisesta statuksesta.Markku Keinänen - 2012 - Maailma.
    This paper (in Finnish) concerns the ontological status of categories of entities. I argue that categories are not be considered as further entities. Rather, it is suffcient for entities belonging to the same category that they are in exactly the same formal ontological relations and have the same general category features.
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  • Laws, Causality and the Intentional Explanation of Action.Zhu Xu - 2010 - Frontiers of Philosophy in China 5 (2):280-293.
    Whether or not an intentional explanation of action necessarily involves law-like statements is related to another question, namely, is it a causal explanation? The Popper-Hempel Thesis , which answers both questions affirmatively, inevitably faces a dilemma between realistic and universalistic requirements. However, in terms of W.C. Salmon’s concept of causal explanation, intentional explanation can be a causal one even if it does not rely on any laws. Based on this, we are able to refute three characteristic arguments for the claim (...)
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  • “Hacia un mundo moral”: el postulado del progreso como terapia en la filosofía de la historia kantiana.Luis Moisés López Flores - 2014 - Páginas de Filosofía (Universidad Nacional del Comahue) 15 (18):51-74.
    La Ilustración suele ser definida como la época del optimismo racional, es decir, de la confianza en la razón como motor del progreso humano. Sin embargo, dicho diagnóstico se ha convertido en estigma y ha llevado algunos autores a afirmar que la idea de progreso es un exceso metafísico y que la confianza en la razón es una ingenuidad. En contra de esta interpretación usual presento con Kant la idea de progreso como un postulado de la razón práctica con una (...)
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  • Perfection, Progress and Evolution : A Study in the History of Ideas.Marja E. Berclouw - unknown
    : The study of perfection, progress and evolution is a central theme in the history of ideas. This thesis explores this theme seen and understood as part of a discourse in the new fields of anthropology, sociology and psychology in the nineteenth century. A particular focus is on the stance taken by philosophers, scientists and writers in the discussion of theories of human physical and mental evolution, as well as on their views concerning the nature of social progress and historical (...)
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  • The Mental Simulation Debate: A Progress Report.Tony Stone & Martin Davies - 1996 - In Peter Carruthers & Peter K. Smith (eds.), Theories of Theories of Mind. Cambridge University Press. pp. 119--137.
    1. Introduction For philosophers, the current phase of the debate with which this volume is concerned can be taken to have begun in 1986, when Jane Heal and Robert Gordon published their seminal papers (Heal, 1986; Gordon, 1986; though see also, for example, Stich, 1981; Dennett, 1981). They raised a dissenting voice against what was becoming a philosophical orthodoxy: that our everyday, or folk, understanding of the mind should be thought of as theoretical. In opposition to this picture, Gordon and (...)
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  • The Structure of a Metaphysical Interpretation of Science of History.Yunlong Guo - 2018 - Dissertation, Cardiff University
    The aim of this research is to reconstruct a metaphysical interpretation of the philosophy of history with regard to the spirit of historical thinking. The spirit of historical thinking is to emphasize the relation between what happened in the past and historical thinking about the past in the present. However, current philosophies of history, which are largely epistemologically oriented, have not adequately explored this relation. In order to investigate the relation between past and present, I refer to an Aristotelian philosophy (...)
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  • Nature of Talk and Interaction in the Singapore History Classroom.Pamela Chellappah Thuraisingam - unknown
    History is a complex subject. It is more propositional than procedural in nature, and involves adductive thinking, where historical evidence and facts are 'teased out' and a convincing account of the past is then reconstructed through speculation, imagination and empathy. The teaching and learning of history should not just be the transmission of knowledge, but rather it should involve a process whereby students and teachers interact in order to analyze evidence, raise questions and hypotheses, synthesize facts, and communicate their ideas, (...)
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  • Representing the Past.Ludovica Lorusso - unknown
    In my dissertation I define historical disciplines as disciplines that aim to give a historical interpretation of the evidence. Phylogenetic systematics is a historical discipline and therefore in my definition phylogenies should be thought of as historical interpretations of relationships between taxa.
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  • Freud's Own Blend : Functional Analysis, Idiographic Explanation and the Extension of Ordinary Psychology.Neil C. Manson - 2003 - Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 103 (1):179-195.
    If we are to understand why psychoanalysis extends ordinary psychology in the precise ways that it does, we must take account of the existence of, and the interplay between, two distinct kinds of explanatory concern: functional and idiographic. The form and content of psychoanalytic explanation and its unusual methodology can, at least in part, be viewed as emerging out of Freud's attempt to reconcile these two types of explanatory concern. We must also acknowledge the role of the background theoretical context (...)
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  • Who Wrote the Trisvabhāvanirdeśa? Reflections on an Enigmatic Text and Its Place in the History of Buddhist Philosophy.Matthew Kapstein - 2018 - Journal of Indian Philosophy 46 (1):1-30.
    In recent decades, scholars of Buddhist philosophy have frequently treated the Trisvabhāvanirdeśa, or “Teaching of the Three Natures,” attributed to Vasubandhu, as an authentic and authoritative representation of that celebrated thinker’s mature work within the Yogācāra tradition. However, serious questions may be posed concerning the status and authority of the TSN within Yogācāra, its true authorship, and the relation of its contents to trends in early Yogācāra thought. In the present article, we review the actual state of our knowledge of (...)
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  • Introduction: Beyond Empiricism in the Social Explanation of Action.Robrecht Vanderbeeken * & Stefaan E. Cuypers - 2004 - Philosophical Explorations 7 (3):197-200.
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  • Longing, Dread and Care: Spengler’s Account of the Existential Structure of Human Experience.Gregory Morgan Swer - 2019 - Journal of the British Society for Phenomenology 51 (1):71-87.
    ABSTRACTIn The Decline of the West Spengler puts forward a type of philosophical anthropology, an account of the structures of human experiential consciousness and a method of “physiognomic” analys...
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  • Non-Reductivism and the Metaphilosophy of Mind.Giuseppina D’oro, Paul Giladi & Alexis Papazoglou - 2019 - Inquiry: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy 62 (5):477-503.
    ABSTRACTThis paper discusses the metaphilosophical assumptions that have dominated analytic philosophy of mind, and how they gave rise to the central question that the best-known forms of non-reductivism available have sought to answer, namely: how can mind fit within nature? Its goal is to make room for forms of non-reductivism that have challenged the fruitfulness of this question, and which have taken a different approach to the so-called “placement” problem. Rather than trying to solve the placement problem, the forms of (...)
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  • A Moderate Hermeneutical Approach to Empathy in History Education.Tyson Retz - 2015 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 47 (3):1-13.
    The concept of empathy in history education involves students in the attempt to think within the context of historical agents’ particular predicaments. Tracing the concept’s philosophical heritage to R. G. Collingwood’s philosophy of history and ‘re-enactment doctrine’, this article argues that our efforts in history classrooms to understand historical agents by their own standards are constrained by a tension that arises out of the need to disconnect ourselves from a present that provides the very means for understanding the past. Though (...)
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  • Language, Aesthetics and Emotions in the Work of the British Idealists.Colin Tyler & James Connelly - 2018 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 26 (4):643-659.
    ABSTRACTThis article surveys and contextualizes the British idealists’ philosophical writings on language, aesthetics and emotions, starting with T. H. Green and concluding with Michael Oakeshott. It highlights ways in which their philosophical insights have been wrongly overlooked by later writers. It explores R. L. Nettleship’s posthumous publications in this field and notes that they exerted significant influences on British idealists and closely related figures, such as Bernard Bosanquet and R. G. Collingwood. The writing of other figures are also explored, not (...)
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  • The Touch of King Midas: Collingwood on Why Actions Are Not Events.Giuseppina D’Oro - 2018 - Philosophical Explorations 21 (1):160-169.
    It is the ambition of natural science to provide complete explanations of reality. Collingwood argues that science can only explain events, not actions. The latter is the distinctive subject matter of history and can be described as actions only if they are explained historically. This paper explains Collingwood’s claim that the distinctive subject matter of history is actions and why the attempt to capture this subject matter through the method of science inevitably ends in failure because science explains events, not (...)
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  • The Present's Historical Task: Kracauer as Reader of Collingwood.James Kent - 2016 - Critical Horizons 17 (3-4):338-357.
    Siegfried Kracauer's reading of the work of R.G. Collingwood illuminates the crisis point in the relation between philosophy, history and how the present is thought. In this paper I argue that Kracauer's dismissal of Collingwood illuminates a misunderstanding of the latter's philosophical project, and takes no account of a certain affinity between the two thinkers. Collingwood not only shared Kracauer's view that a philosophically oriented historical investigation of the past might offer some hope for the present, but also had a (...)
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  • A Critical Assessment of the Programmes of Producing ‘Islamic Science’ and ‘Islamisation of Science/Knowledge’.Ali Paya - 2015 - International Studies in the Philosophy of Science 29 (3):311-335.
    In the present article, working from within the framework of critical rationalism and focusing mostly on the views developed by some Iranian writers, I argue that the programmes of producing ‘Islamic Science’ and ‘Islamisation of Science/Knowledge’ are doomed to failure. I develop my arguments in three parts. I start by explaining that the advocates of the programmes of producing cIS or IoK subscribe to mistaken images of science that are shaped by either a positivist or outmoded culturalist/interpretivist theories of science. (...)
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  • In Defence of Hume's Historical Method.Alix Cohen - 2005 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 13 (3):489 – 502.
    A tradition among certain Hume scholars, best known as the ‘New Humeans’, proposes a novel reading of Hume’s work, and in particular of his conception of causality.2 The purpose of this paper is to conduct a similar move regarding Hume’s historical method. It is similar for two reasons: firstly, it is intended to reintegrate Hume’s theory into present-day debates on the nature of history; and secondly, the reading I propose is directed against the standard interpretation of Hume’s history. This interpretation (...)
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  • The Limits of Instrumental Rationality in Social Explanation.Doug Mann - 1999 - Critical Review 13 (1-2):165-189.
    Abstract The goal of social explanation is to understand human action, both individual and collective. To do so successfully we must explain action on three distinct (but intertwined) levels: the actors? intentions, the meaning that actors and interpreters ascribe to action, and the structural ideals that govern action. Each level of explanation has certain types of rationality associated with it. Only on the level of intentionality does instrumental rationality assume a prime importance, yet even there it must compete with normative (...)
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  • Limits to Problem Solving in Science.Struan Jacobs - 2001 - International Studies in the Philosophy of Science 15 (3):231 – 242.
    Popper, Polanyi and Duncker represent the widely held position that theoretical and experimental scientific research are motivated by problems to which discoveries are solutions. According to the argument here, their views are unsupported and - in light of counter-instances, anomalous chance discoveries, and the force of curiosity - over-generalized.
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  • The Ethical Dimension of Folk Psychology?Karsten R. Stueber - 2009 - Inquiry: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy 52 (5):532-547.
    Participants in the debate about the nature of folk psychology tend to share one fundamental assumption: that its primary purpose consists in the prediction and explanation of another person's behavior. The following essay will evaluate recent challenges to this assumption by philosophers such as Joshua Knobe who insist that folk psychology and its concepts are intimately linked to our ethical concerns. I will show how conceiving of folk psychology in an engaged manner enables one to account for the evidence cited (...)
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  • On Studying the Past Scientifically.Theodore Schatzki - 2006 - Inquiry: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy 49 (4):380 – 399.
    This critical review of Aviezer Tucker's Our Knowledge of the Past: A Philosophy of Historiography examines the character, scope, and limits of scientific historiography, the overall topic of Tucker's book. The review begins by arguing that the book both unwittingly juggles two criteria for scientific, as opposed to nonscientific, historiography - the production of knowledge and Kuhnian disciplinary matrices - and wrongly construes the subject matter of such historiography to be present evidence for the past as opposed to this evidence (...)
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  • Folk Psychology as Simulation.Robert Gordon - 1986 - Mind and Language 1 (2):158-71.
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  • Tales of Wonder: Ian Hacking: Why is There Philosophy of Mathematics at All? Cambridge University Press, 2014, 304pp, $80 HB.Brendan Larvor - 2015 - Metascience 24 (3):471-478.
    Why is there Philosophy of Mathematics at all? Ian Hacking. in Metascience (2015).
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  • Sociology as a Science.David V. McQueen - 1981 - Zeitschrift Für Allgemeine Wissenschaftstheorie 12 (2):263-284.
    Summary Presented here is an overview from the standpoints of sociology, history of science, philosophy of science and pure science of the lingering question of whether sociology is a form of scientific pursuit. The conclusion is drawn that sociology barely meets any of the rigid criteria traditionally associated with the natural sciences. Sociology is viewed as having a position of theory and argument which is labeled inconoclastic scepticism.
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  • Lebenswelt Structures of Galilean Physics: The Case of Galileo's Pendulum. [REVIEW]Dušan I. Bjelic - 1996 - Human Studies 19 (4):409 - 432.
    The aim of this paper is to give a self-reflective account of the building of Galileo's pendulum in order to discover what were the practical contingencies of building and using the pendulum for demonstrating the law of isochronism. In doing this, the unique Lebenswelt structures of Galilean physics are explicated through the ethnomethodological concepts developed by Harold Garfinkel. The presupposition is that the practical logic of Galilean physics is embedded in the instruments themselves. In building the pendulum and recovering its (...)
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  • In What Sense is Understanding an Intellectual Virtue?Xingming Hu - forthcoming - Synthese:1-13.
    In this paper, I distinguish between two senses of “understanding”: understanding as an epistemic good and understanding as a character trait or a distinctive power of the mind. I argue that understanding as a character trait or a distinctive power of the mind is an intellectual virtue while understanding as an epistemic good is not. Finally, I show how the distinction can help us better appreciate Aristotle’s account of intellectual virtue.
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  • Collingwood, Psychologism and Internalism.Giuseppina D'Oro - 2004 - European Journal of Philosophy 12 (2):163-177.
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  • The Logical Priority of the Question: R. G. Collingwood, Philosophical Hermeneutics and Enquiry‐Based Learning.David Aldridge - 2013 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 47 (1):71-85.
    The thesis that all learning has the character of enquiry is advanced and its implications are explored. R. G. Collingwood's account of ‘the logical priority of the question’ is explained and Hans‐Georg Gadamer's hermeneutical justification and development, particularly the rejection of the re‐enactment thesis, is discussed. Educators are encouraged to consider the following implications of the character of the question implied in all learning: that it is a question that is constituted in the event rather than prepared or given in (...)
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