Switch to: References

Add citations

You must login to add citations.
  1. Administrative Lies and Philosopher-Kings.David Simpson - 1996 - Philosophical Inquiry 18 (3-4):45-65.
    The question of whether lies by those who govern are acceptable receives a clear focus and an ideal case in the Republic. Against C. D. C. Reeve, and T. C. Brickhouse and N. D Smith, I argue that the Republic’s apparent recommendation of administrative lies is incoherent. While lies may be a necessary part of the City’s administration, the process and practice of lying undermines that nature which is necessary for any suitable ruler – rendering the ideal impossible. I argue (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Aristotle and the Origins of Evil.Jozef Müller - 2020 - Phronesis: A Journal for Ancient Philosophy 65 (2):179-223.
    The paper addresses the following question: why do human beings, on Aristotle’s view, have an innate tendency to badness, that is, to developing desires that go beyond, and often against, their natural needs? Given Aristotle’s teleological assumptions (including the thesis that nature does nothing in vain), such tendency should not be present. I argue that the culprit is to be found in the workings of rationality. In particular, it is the presence of theoretical reason that necessitates the limitless nature of (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Thrasymachus’ Unerring Skill and the Arguments of Republic 1.Tamer Nawar - 2018 - Phronesis 63 (4):359-391.
    In defending the view that justice is the advantage of the stronger, Thrasymachus puzzlingly claims that rulers never err and that any practitioner of a skill or expertise (τέχνη) is infallible. In what follows, Socrates offers a number of arguments directed against Thrasymachus’ views concerning the nature of skill, ruling, and justice. Commentators typically take a dim view of both Thrasymachus’ claims about skill (which are dismissed as an ungrounded and purely ad hoc response to Socrates’ initial criticisms) and Socrates’ (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • The Concept of Freedom in Plato’s Republic.Sergio Ariza - 2017 - Archai: Revista de Estudos Sobre as Origens Do Pensamento Ocidental 19:33-59.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Thrasymachus of Chalcedon on the Platonic Stage.Dorota Zygmuntowicz - 2019 - Journal of Ancient Philosophy 13 (1):1-39.
    The conviction that Plato manipulated Thrasymachus’ views is today accepted by the scholarly opinion. Given the absence of testimonies regarding the political and moral views held by the historical Thrasymachus, the degree of this manipulation can be gauged only by assessing the degree of incoherence and ambiguity in the views of the Platonic Thrasymachus. This perspective, of necessity a self-referential one, is overcome by the hypothesis presented in the following article, namely, that Plato manipulates not as much the views of (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Rehabilitating the ‘City of Pigs’.Joel De Lara - 2018 - Journal of Ancient Philosophy 12 (2):1-22.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • The Politics of Virtue in Plato's "Laws".John Melvin Armstrong - 1998 - Dissertation, The University of Arizona
    This dissertation identifies and explains four major contributions of the Laws and related late dialogues to Plato's moral and political philosophy. -/- Chapter 1: I argue that Plato thinks the purpose of laws and other social institutions is the happiness of the city. A happy city is one in which the city's parts, i.e. the citizens, are unified under the rule of intelligence. Unlike the citizens of the Republic, the citizens of the Laws can all share the same true judgments (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Plato on Well-Being.Eric Brown - 2016 - In Guy Fletcher (ed.), The Routledge Handbook of Philosophy of Well-Being. London, UK: pp. 9-19.
    Plato's dialogues use several terms for the concept of well-being, which concept plays a central ethical role as the ultimate goal for action and a central political role as the proper aim for states. But the dialogues also reveal sharp debate about what human well-being is. I argue that they endorse a Socratic conception of well-being as virtuous activity, by considering and rejecting several alternatives, including an ordinary conception that lists a variety of goods, a Protagorean conception that identifies one's (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Colloquium 8: Yet Another Way to Read the Republic?Alasdair Macintyre - 2008 - Proceedings of the Boston Area Colloquium of Ancient Philosophy 23 (1):205-224.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Departed Souls? Tripartition at the Close of Plato’s Republic.Nathan Bauer - 2017 - Logical Analysis and History of Philosophy 20:139-157.
    Plato’s tripartite soul plays a central role in his account of justice in the Republic. It thus comes as a surprise to find him apparently abandoning this model at the end of the work, when he suggests that the soul, as immortal, must be simple. I propose a way of reconciling these claims, appealing to neglected features of the city-soul analogy and the argument for the soul’s division. The original true soul, I argue, is partitioned, but in a finer manner (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Plato on the Philosophical Benefits of Musical Education.Naly Thaler - 2015 - Phronesis 60 (4):410-435.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Colloquium 3: The Unjust Philosophers of Republic VII.Roslyn Weiss - 2012 - Proceedings of the Boston Area Colloquium of Ancient Philosophy 27 (1):65-103.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Colloquium 7: The Relationship Between Justice and Happiness in Plato’s Republic.Daniel Devereux - 2005 - Proceedings of the Boston Area Colloquium of Ancient Philosophy 20 (1):265-312.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Ausland/Sanday Bibliography.Editors Proceedings of the Boston Ar - 2013 - Proceedings of the Boston Area Colloquium of Ancient Philosophy 28 (1):36-39.
    Download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Commentary on Rist: Is Plato Interested in Meta-Ethics?Rachel Barney - 1998 - Proceedings of the Boston Area Colloquium of Ancient Philosophy 14 (1):73-82.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Plato's Critique of the Democratic Character.Dominic Scott - 2000 - Phronesis 45 (1):19-37.
    This paper tackles some issues arising from Plato's account of the democratic man in Rep. VIII. One problem is that Plato tends to analyse him in terms of the desires that he fulfils, yet sends out conflicting signals about exactly what kind of desires are at issue. Scholars are divided over whether all of the democrat's desires are appetites. There is, however, strong evidence against seeing him as exclusively appetitive: rather he is someone who satisfies desires from all three parts (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  • Socratic Dialectic and the Resolution of Fallacy in Plato's Euthydemus.Carrie Elizabeth Swanson - unknown
    My dissertation is devoted to an examination of the resolution of fallacy in Plato's Euthydemus. It is a familiar claim that the Euthydemus champions Socratic argumentation over sophistical or eristic reasoning. No consensus however exists regarding either the nature or philosophical significance of Socrates’ treatment of the fallacies he confronts. I argue that a careful reading of the dialogue reveals that the Socratic response to fallacious reasoning is conducted at two different levels of philosophical sophistication. Socrates relies upon the resources (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Filosof U Platonovoj Državi.Aleksandar Nikitović - 2012 - Filozofija I Društvo 23 (3):388-406.
    Download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Socrates And The Patients: Republic IX, 583c-585a.James Warren - 2011 - Phronesis 56 (2):113-137.
    Republic IX 583c-585a presents something surprisingly unusual in ancient accounts of pleasure and pain: an argument in favour of the view that there are three relevant hedonic states: pleasure, pain, and an intermediate. The argument turns on the proposal that a person's evaluation of their current state may be misled by a comparison with a prior or subsequent state. The argument also refers to `pure' and anticipated pleasures. The brief remarks in the Republic may appear cursory or clumsy in comparison (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  • Anarchic Souls: Plato’s Depiction of the ‘Democratic Man’.Mark Johnstone - 2013 - Phronesis 58 (2):139-59.
    In books 8 and 9 of Plato’s Republic, Socrates provides a detailed account of the nature and origins of four main kinds of vice found in political constitutions and in the kinds of people that correspond to them. The third of the four corrupt kinds of person he describes is the ‘democratic man’. In this paper, I ask what ‘rules’ in the democratic man’s soul. It is commonly thought that his soul is ruled in some way by its appetitive part, (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  • Commentary on Reeve.Mark Schiefsky - 2000 - Proceedings of the Boston Area Colloquium of Ancient Philosophy 16 (1):223-228.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Early Education in Plato's Republic.Michelle Jenkins - 2015 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 23 (5):843-863.
    In this paper, I reconsider the commonly held position that the early moral education of the Republic is arational since the youths of the Kallipolis do not yet have the capacity for reason. I argue that, because they receive an extensive mathematical education alongside their moral education, the youths not only have a capacity for reason but that capacity is being developed in their early education. If this is so, though, then we must rethink why the early moral education is (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • Tyrannized Souls: Plato's Depiction of the ‘Tyrannical Man’.Mark A. Johnstone - 2015 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 23 (3):423-437.
    In book 9 of Plato's Republic, Socrates describes the nature and origins of the ‘tyrannical man’, whose soul is said to be ‘like’ a tyrannical city. In this paper, I examine the nature of the ‘government’ that exists within the tyrannical man's soul. I begin by demonstrating the inadequacy of three potentially attractive views sometimes found in the literature on Plato: the view that the tyrannical man's soul is ruled by his ‘lawless’ unnecessary appetites, the view that it is ruled (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  • Freedom of the Will in Plato and Augustine.Jonathan Hecht - 2014 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 22 (2):196-216.
    There has been a recent surge of interest in ancient accounts of free will. It is surprising, then, that there have been virtually no attempts to discuss whether Plato had such an account. Those who have made an attempt quickly deny that such an account is present in the dialogues. I shall argue that if we draw a distinction between two notions of free will, it is plausible that some account of free will is, in fact, present in the dialogues, (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • In Search of an Ethical University: A Proposed East–West Integrative Vision.David K. K. Chan - 2011 - Ethics and Education 6 (3):267 - 278.
    This article employs a sociological analysis of the changing role and mission of higher education from that of a ?public good? to that of a service industry. In this regard, the rise of modern universities as corporate enterprises in the recent decades has often neglected the important dimension of education as a process of enlightenment, with its ethical and moral dimensions. The author tries to put into perspective the relevance of searching for an ?ethical university? by proposing to integrate the (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Plato on the Rule of Reason.Fred D. Miller - 2005 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 43 (S1):50-83.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Pleasure and Illusion in Plato.Jessica Moss - 2006 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 72 (3):503 - 535.
    Plato links pleasure with illusion, and this link explains his rejection of the view that all desires are rational desires for the good. The Protagoras and Gorgias show connections between pleasure and illusion; the Republic develops these into a psychological theory. One part of the soul is not only prone to illusions, but also incapable of the kind of reasoning that can dispel them. Pleasure appears good; therefore this part of the soul (the appetitive part) desires pleasures qua good but (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   11 citations  
  • Why Women Must Guard and Rule in Plato's Kallipolis.Catherine Mckeen - 2006 - Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 87 (4):527–548.
    Plato's discussion of women in the Republic is problematic. For one, arguments in Book V which purport to establish that women should guard and rule alongside men do not deliver the advertised conclusion. In addition, Plato asserts that women are "weaker in all pursuits" than men. Given this assumption, having women guard and rule seems inimical to the health, security, and goodness of the kallipolis. I argue that we best understand the inclusion of women by seeing how women's inclusion contributes (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • Trasímaco E a Téchne Do Governo.Luiz Maurício Bentim da Rocha Menezes - 2019 - Trans/Form/Ação 42 (2):9-30.
    RESUMO: Ao associar governo à téchne, Trasímaco estabelece que o governo também exige um conhecimento específico. Esse saber permitiria que o governante pudesse beneficiar-se dos governados, tirando proveito deles. Em sua definição de governo, ele aproximará essa téchne do governo ao governante injusto, mais especificamente o tirano. Neste trabalho, pretende-se analisar a relevância dos argumentos de Trasímaco para a filosofia política. ABSTRACT: By associating government with téchne, Thrasymachus states that government requires specific knowledge. This knowledge allows the ruler to benefit (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Pleasure and Truth in Republic 9.David Wolfsdorf - 2013 - Classical Quarterly 63 (1):110-138.
    At Republic 9, 583b1–587a2, Socrates argues that the pleasure of the philosophical life is the truest pleasure. I will call this the ‘true pleasure argument’. The true pleasure argument is divisible into two parts: 583b1–585a7 and 585a8–587a2. Each part contains a sub-argument, which I will call ‘the misperception argument’ and ‘the true filling argument’ respectively. In the misperception argument Socrates argues that it is characteristic of irrational men to misperceive as pleasant what in fact is a condition of neither having (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • The Role of Money in Plato’s Republic, Book I.Thomas Noutsopoulos - 2015 - Historical Materialism 23 (2):131-156.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Images as Images: Commentary on Smith.David Roochnik - 1997 - Proceedings of the Boston Area Colloquium of Ancient Philosophy 13 (1):205-212.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Varieties of Moral Experience: Cephalic Erlebnis and Odyssean Erfahrung.Alan Kim - 2005 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 43 (Supplement):41-49.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • “Standing Apart in the Shelter of the City Wall”: The Contemplative Ideal Vs. The Politically Engaged Philosopher in Plato's Political Theory.Catherine McKeen - 2010 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 48 (2):197-216.
    Natural philosophers seem to have good reasons to prefer that the kallipolis, the maximally just community of the Republic, is never realized. If such a community is realized, philosophers are under the obligation of a just demand that they govern. However, a life that contains governance as a significant part is not the happiest life a philosopher can live. The happiest life for a philosopher is one consisting entirely or largely in philosophical contemplation. I confront this puzzle by arguing that (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • The Tripartite Theory of Motivation in Plato’s Republic.Rachel Singpurwalla - 2010 - Philosophy Compass 5 (11):880-892.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • How Should I Be? A Defense of Platonic Rational Egoism.Jyl Gentzler - 2012 - European Journal of Philosophy 20 (4):39-67.
    There has been a long tradition of interpreting Plato as a rational egoist. Over the past few decades, however, some scholars have challenged this reading. While Rational Egoism appeals to many ordinary folk, in sophisticated philosophical circles it has fallen out of favor as a general and complete account of the nature of reasons for action. I argue that while the theory of practical rationality that is often equated with rational egoism—a view that I call ‘Simple-Minded Rational Egoism'—is neither plausible (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Alief in Action (and Reaction).Tamar Szabó Gendler - 2008 - Mind and Language 23 (5):552--585.
    I introduce and argue for the importance of a cognitive state that I call alief. An alief is, to a reasonable approximation, an innate or habitual propensity to respond to an apparent stimulus in a particular way. Recognizing the role that alief plays in our cognitive repertoire provides a framework for understanding reactions that are governed by nonconscious or automatic mechanisms, which in turn brings into proper relief the role played by reactions that are subject to conscious regulation and deliberate (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   111 citations  
  • Socrates and Plato on the Possibility of Akrasia.Thomas Gardner - 2002 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 40 (2):191-210.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation