Switch to: References

Citations of:

Change Detection

Annual Review of Psychology 53 (1):245-277 (2002)

Add citations

You must login to add citations.
  1. Types of Attention Matter for Awareness: A Study with Color Afterimages.Shruti Baijal & Narayanan Srinivasan - 2009 - Consciousness and Cognition 18 (4):1039-1048.
    It has been argued that attention and awareness might oppose each other given that attending to an adapting stimulus weakens its afterimage. We argue instead that the type of attention guided by the spread of attention and the level of processing is critical and might result in differences in awareness using afterimages. Participants performed a central task with small, large, local or global letters and a blue square as an adapting stimulus in two experiments and indicated the onset and offset (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • Styled Morphogeometry.Liliana Albertazzi - 2020 - Axiomathes 30 (3):227-250.
    The paper presents analysis of form in different domains. It draws on the commonalities and their potential unified classifications based on how forms subjectively appear in perception—as opposed to their standard specification in Euclidean geometry or other objective quantitative methods. The paper provides an overview aiming to offer elements for thought for researchers in various fields.
    Download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Automatic Change Detection: Mismatch Negativity and the Now-Classic Rensink, O’Reagan, and Clark (1997) Stimuli.Domonkos File, Bela Petro, Zsófia Anna Gaál, Nóra Csikós & István Czigler - 2022 - Frontiers in Psychology 13.
    Change blindness experiments had demonstrated that detection of significant changes in natural images is extremely difficult when brief blank fields are placed between alternating displays of an original and a modified scene. On the other hand, research on the visual mismatch negativity component of the event-related potentials identified sensitivity to events different from the regularity of stimulus sequences, even if the deviant and standard events are non-attended. The present study sought to investigate the apparent controversy between the experience under the (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Attention.Christopher Mole - 2010 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   34 citations  
  • Undetected Changes in Visible Stimuli Influence Subsequent Decisions.Axel Cleeremans - 2008 - Consciousness and Cognition 17 (3):646-656.
    Change blindness—our inability to detect changes in a stimulus—occurs even when the change takes place gradually, without any disruption [Simons, D. J., Franconeri, S. L., & Reimer, R. L. . Change blindness in the absence of a visual disruption. Perception, 29, 1143–1154]. Such gradual changes are more difficult to detect than changes that involve a disruption. Using this method, David et al. [David, E., Laloyaux, C., Devue, C., & Cleeremans, A. . Change blindness to gradual changes in facial expressions. Psychologica (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  • A Unified Cognitive Model of Visual Filling-In Based on an Emergic Network Architecture.David Pierre Leibovitz - 2013 - Dissertation, Carleton University
    The Emergic Cognitive Model (ECM) is a unified computational model of visual filling-in based on the Emergic Network architecture. The Emergic Network was designed to help realize systems undergoing continuous change. In this thesis, eight different filling-in phenomena are demonstrated under a regime of continuous eye movement (and under static eye conditions as well). -/- ECM indirectly demonstrates the power of unification inherent with Emergic Networks when cognition is decomposed according to finer-grained functions supporting change. These can interact to raise (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Embodied Cognition and the Magical Future of Interaction Design.David Kirsh - 2013 - ACM Transactions on Computer-Human Interaction 20 (1):30.
    The theory of embodied cognition can provide HCI practitioners and theorists with new ideas about interac-tion and new principles for better designs. I support this claim with four ideas about cognition: (1) interacting with tools changes the way we think and perceive – tools, when manipulated, are soon absorbed into the body schema, and this absorption leads to fundamental changes in the way we perceive and conceive of our environments; (2) we think with our bodies not just with our brains; (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   21 citations  
  • A Psychologically-Based Taxonomy of Misdirection.Gustav Kuhn, Hugo A. Caffaratti, Robert Teszka & Ronald A. Rensink - 2014 - Frontiers in Psychology 5.
    Magicians use misdirection to prevent you from realizing the methods used to create a magical effect, thereby allowing you to experience an apparently impossible event. Magicians have acquired much knowledge about misdirection, and have suggested several taxonomies of misdirection. These describe many of the fundamental principles in misdirection, focusing on how misdirection is achieved by magicians. In this article we review the strengths and weaknesses of past taxonomies, and argue that a more natural way of making sense of misdirection is (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   13 citations  
  • Changes.Ronald A. Rensink - 2002 - Progress in Brain Research 140:199-209.
    This past decade has seen a great resurgence of interest in the perception of change. Change has, of course, long been recognized as a phenomenon worthy of study, and vision scientists have given their attention to it at various times in the past (for a review, see Rensink, 2002a). But things seem different this time around. This time, there is an emerging belief that instead of being just another visual ability, the perception of change may be something central to our (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • The Management of Visual Attention in Graphic Displays.Ronald A. Rensink - 2011 - In Human Attention in Digital Environments. Cambridge University Press. pp. 63-92.
    This chapter presents an overview of several recent developments in vision science, and outlines some of their implications for the management of visual attention in graphic displays. These include ways of sending attention to the right item at the right time, techniques to improve attentional efficiency, and possibilities for offloading some of the processing typically done by attention onto nonattentional mechanisms. In addition it is argued that such techniques not only allow more effective use to be made of visual attention, (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Change Blindness: Past, Present, and Future.Daniel J. Simons & Ronald A. Rensink - 2005 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 9 (1):16-20.
    Change blindness is the striking failure to see large changes that normally would be noticed easily. Over the past decade this phenomenon has greatly contributed to our understanding of attention, perception, and even consciousness. The surprising extent of change blindness explains its broad appeal, but its counterintuitive nature has also engendered confusions about the kinds of inferences that legitimately follow from it. Here we discuss the legitimate and the erroneous inferences that have been drawn, and offer a set of requirements (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   114 citations  
  • Obscuring Length Changes During Animated Motion.Jason Harrison, Ronald A. Rensink & Michiel van de Panne - 2004 - ACM Transactions on Graphics 23:569-573.
    In this paper we examine to what extent the lengths of the links in an animated articulated figure can be changed without the viewer being aware of the change. This is investigated in terms of a framework that emphasizes the role of attention in visual perception. We conducted a set of five experiments to establish bounds for the sen-sitivity to changes in length as a function of several parameters and the amount of attention available. We found that while length changes (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Change Blindness.Ronald A. Rensink - 2005 - In Laurent Itti, Geraint Rees & John K. Tsotsos (eds.), Neurobiology of Attention. Academic Press. pp. 76--81.
    Large changes that occur in clear view of an observer can become difficult to notice if made during an eye movement, blink, or other such disturbance. This change blindness is consistent with the proposal that focused visual attention is necessary to see change, with a change becoming difficult to notice whenever conditions prevent attention from being automatically drawn to it. -/- It is shown here how the phenomenon of change blindness can provide new results on the nature of visual attention, (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   56 citations  
  • Temporal Coding of Visual Space.Michele Rucci, Ehud Ahissar & David Burr - 2018 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 22 (10):883-895.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Physical Time Within Human Time.Ronald P. Gruber, Richard A. Block & Carlos Montemayor - 2022 - Frontiers in Psychology 13.
    A possible solution is offered to help resolve the “two times problem” regarding the veridical and illusory nature of time. First it is recognized that the flow of time is part of a wider array of temporal experiences referred to as manifest time, all of which need to be reconciled. Then, an information gathering and utilizing system model is used as a basis for a view of manifest time. The model IGUS robot of Hartle that solves the “unique present” debate (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Breaking the Silence: Motion Silencing and Experience of Change.Ian Phillips - 2014 - Philosophical Studies 168 (3):693-707.
    The naïve view of temporal experience (Phillips, in: Lloyd D, Arstila V (eds) Subjective time: the philosophy, psychology, and neuroscience of temporality, forthcoming-a) comprises two claims. First, that we are perceptually aware of temporal properties, such as succession and change. Second, that for any temporal property apparently presented in experience, our experience itself possesses that temporal property. In his paper ‘Silencing the experience of change’ (forthcoming), Watzl argues that this second naïve inheritance thesis faces a novel counter-example in the form (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  • Intuitive And Reflective Responses In Philosophy.Nick Byrd - 2014 - Dissertation, University of Colorado
    Cognitive scientists have revealed systematic errors in human reasoning. There is disagreement about what these errors indicate about human rationality, but one upshot seems clear: human reasoning does not seem to fit traditional views of human rationality. This concern about rationality has made its way through various fields and has recently caught the attention of philosophers. The concern is that if philosophers are prone to systematic errors in reasoning, then the integrity of philosophy would be threatened. In this paper, I (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  • Mindfulness and the Cognitive Neuroscience of Attention and Awareness.Antonino Raffone, Angela Tagini & Narayanan Srinivasan - 2010 - Zygon 45 (3):627-646.
    Mindfulness can be understood as the mental ability to focus on the direct and immediate perception or monitoring of the present moment with a state of open and nonjudgmental awareness. Descriptions of mindfulness and methods for cultivating it originated in eastern spiritual traditions. These suggest that mindfulness can be developed through meditation practice to increase positive qualities such as awareness, insight, wisdom, and compassion. In this article we focus on the relationships between mindfulness, with associated meditation practices, and the cognitive (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  • Experience of and in Time.Ian Phillips - 2014 - Philosophy Compass 9 (2):131-144.
    How must experience of time be structured in time? In particular, does the following principle, which I will call inheritance, hold: for any temporal property apparently presented in perceptual experience, experience itself has that same temporal property. For instance, if I hear Paul McCartney singing ‘Hey Jude’, must my auditory experience of the ‘Hey’ itself precede my auditory experience of the ‘Jude’, or can the temporal order of these experiences come apart from the order the words are experienced as having? (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   23 citations  
  • Change Blindness and Priming: When It Does and Does Not Occur.Michael E. Silverman & Arien Mack - 2006 - Consciousness and Cognition 15 (2):409-422.
    In a series of three experiments, we explored the nature of implicit representations in change blindness . Using 3 × 3 letter arrays, we asked subjects to locate changes in paired arrays separated by 80 ms ISIs, in which one, two or three letters of a row in the second array changed. In one testing version, a tone followed the second array, signaling a row for partial report . In the other version, no PR was required. After Ss reported whether (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   16 citations  
  • Change Blindness Blindness: Beliefs About the Roles of Intention and Scene Complexity in Change Detection.Melissa R. Beck, Daniel T. Levin & Bonnie Angelone - 2007 - Consciousness and Cognition 16 (1):31-51.
    Observers have difficulty detecting visual changes. However, they are unaware of this inability, suggesting that people do not have an accurate understanding of visual processes. We explored whether this error is related to participants’ beliefs about the roles of intention and scene complexity in detecting changes. In Experiment 1 participants had a higher failure rate for detecting changes in an incidental change detection task than an intentional change detection task. This effect of intention was greatest for complex scenes. However, participants (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   9 citations  
  • Dynamic perceptual completion and the dynamic snapshot view to help solve the ‘two times’ problem.Ronald P. Gruber, Ryan P. Smith & Richard A. Block - 2020 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 19 (4):773-790.
    Perceptual completion fills the gap for discrete perception to become continuous. Similarly, dynamic perceptual completion provides an experience of dynamic continuity. Our recent discovery of the ‘happening’ element of DPC completes the total experience for dynamism in the flow of time. However, a phenomenological explanation for these experiences is essential. The Snapshot Hypotheses especially the Dynamic Snapshot View provides the most comprehensive explanation. From that understanding the ‘two times’ problem can be addressed. The static time of spacetime cosmologies has been (...)
    Download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • Simulation Theory and Interpersonal Utility Comparisons Reconsidered.Mauro Rossi - 2014 - Synthese 191 (6):1185-1210.
    According to a popular strategy amongst economists and philosophers, in order to solve the problem of interpersonal utility comparisons, we have to look at how ordinary people make such comparisons in everyday life. The most recent attempt to develop this strategy has been put forward by Goldman in his “Simulation and Interpersonal Utility” (Ethics 4:709–726, 1995). Goldman claims, first, that ordinary people make interpersonal comparisons by simulation and, second, that simulation is reliable for making interpersonal comparisons. In this paper, I (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Don’T Go Chasing Waterfalls: Motion Aftereffects and the Dynamic Snapshot Theory of Temporal Experience.Camden Alexander McKenna - 2021 - Review of Philosophy and Psychology 12 (4):825-845.
    The philosophical investigation of perceptual illusions can generate fruitful insights in the study of subjective time consciousness. However, the way illusions are interpreted is often controversial. Recently, proponents of the so-called dynamic snapshot theory have appealed to the Waterfall Illusion, a kind of motion aftereffect, to support a particular view of temporal consciousness according to which experience is structured as a series of instantaneous snapshots with dynamic qualities. This dynamism is meant to account for familiar features of the phenomenology of (...)
    Download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Neural Markers Associated with the Temporal Deployment of Attention: A Systematic Review of Non-Motor Psychophysical Measures Post-Stroke.Essie Low, Robin Laycock & Sheila Crewther - 2017 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 11.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Rethinking the Specious Present.Simon James Prosser - 2017 - In Ian Phillips (ed.), The Routledge Handbook of Philosophy of Temporal Experience. London, UK: pp. 146-156.
    In this chapter I argue that despite its current popularity the doctrine of the specious present, or at least every current version of it, should be rejected. I describe two alternative accounts, which deal with experiences of two different kinds of change. The first is what I call the dynamic snapshot theory, which accounts for the way we experience continuous changes such as motion and other motion-like phenomena. The second account deals with the way we experience discontinuous changes, those for (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  • Theory in Psychology: A Review Essay of Andre Kukla's Methods of Theoretical Psychology. [REVIEW]Huib Looren de Jong, Sacha Bem & Maurice Schouten - 2004 - Philosophical Psychology 17 (2):275 – 295.
    This review essay critically discusses Andre Kukla's Methods of theoretical psychology. It is argued that Kukla mistakenly tries to build his case for theorizing in psychology as a separate discipline on a dubious distinction between theory and observation. He then argues that the demise of empiricism implies a return of some form of rationalism, which entails an autonomous role for theorizing in psychology. Having shown how this theory-observation dichotomy goes back to traditional and largely abandoned ideas in epistemology, an alternative (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • Forming and Updating Object Representations Without Awareness: Evidence From Motion-Induced Blindness.Stephen R. Mitroff & Brian J. Scholl - 2005 - Vision Research 45 (8):961-967.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   11 citations  
  • Dreaming and Waking: Similarities and Differences Revisited.Tracey L. Kahan & Stephen P. LaBerge - 2011 - Consciousness and Cognition 20 (3):494-514.
    Dreaming is often characterized as lacking high-order cognitive skills. In two studies, we test the alternative hypothesis that the dreaming mind is highly similar to the waking mind. Multiple experience samples were obtained from late-night REM sleep and waking, following a systematic protocol described in Kahan . Results indicated that reported dreaming and waking experiences are surprisingly similar in their cognitive and sensory qualities. Concurrently, ratings of dreaming and waking experiences were markedly different on questions of general reality orientation and (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   18 citations  
  • Individual Differences in Change Blindness.Katharina Verena Bergmann - unknown
    The present work shows the existence of systematic individual differences in change blindness. It can be concluded that the sensitivity for changes is a trait. That is, persons differ in their ability to detect changes, independent from the situation or the measurement method. Moreover, there are two explanations for individual differences in change blindness: a) capacity differences in visual selective attention that may be influenced by top-down activated attention helping to focus attention onto relevant stimuli b) differences in working memory (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Limitations of Human Visual Working Memory.Maria-Barbara Wesenick - unknown
    The present empirical study investigates limitations of human visual working memory. The experiments of the present work involve the experimental paradigm of change detection using simple geometrical objects in the form of rectangles of different colour, length, and orientation. It can be shown, that a limited performance in the temporary storage of visual information has multiple sources. Limitations of VWM can be attributed to a limited capacity or a limited duration, but also to limitations in retrieval, which so far has (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Embedded Cognition and Mental Causation: Setting Empirical Bounds on Metaphysics. [REVIEW]Fred Keijzer & Maurice Schouten - 2007 - Synthese 158 (1):109 - 125.
    We argue that embedded cognition provides an argument against Jaegwon Kim’s neural reduction of mental causation. Because some mental, or at least psychological processes have to be cast in an externalist way, Kim’s argument can be said to lead to the conclusion that mental causation is as safe as any other form of higher-level of causation.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  • Musical Change Deafness: The Inability to Detect Change in a Non-Speech Auditory Domain.Kat R. Agres & Carol L. Krumhansl - 2008 - In B. C. Love, K. McRae & V. M. Sloutsky (eds.), Proceedings of the 30th Annual Conference of the Cognitive Science Society. Cognitive Science Society. pp. 969--974.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • From Physical Time to a Dualistic Model of Human Time.Ronald P. Gruber, Carlos Montemayor & Richard A. Block - 2020 - Foundations of Science 25 (4):927-954.
    There is a long standing debate as to whether or not time is ‘real’ or illusory, and whether or not human time is a direct reflection of physical time. Differing spacetime cosmologies have opposing views. Exactly what human time entails has, in our opinion, led to the failure to resolve this ‘two times’ problem. To help resolve this issue we propose a dualistic model of human time in which each component has both an illusory and non-illusory aspect. With the dualistic (...)
    Download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Dissecting Intentionality in the Lab: Meinong’s Theory. [REVIEW]Liliana Albertazzi - 2013 - Axiomathes 23 (3):579-596.
    Besides presenting a phenomenological-experimental analysis of consciousness, Meinong challenged one of the major indisputable axioms of current scientific research, i.e. that perception in awareness has to be veridical on the stimulus. Meinong’s analysis of consciousness, which he conducted through a kind of dissection of its structures from a systematic and an experimental viewpoint, offers relevant insights to contemporary consciousness studies.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Unblinking Eyes: The Ethics of Automating Surveillance.Kevin Macnish - 2012 - Ethics and Information Technology 14 (2):151-167.
    In this paper I critique the ethical implications of automating CCTV surveillance. I consider three modes of CCTV with respect to automation: manual, fully automated, and partially automated. In each of these I examine concerns posed by processing capacity, prejudice towards and profiling of surveilled subjects, and false positives and false negatives. While it might seem as if fully automated surveillance is an improvement over the manual alternative in these areas, I demonstrate that this is not necessarily the case. In (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   9 citations  
  • Recognising the Forest, but Not the Trees: An Effect of Colour on Scene Perception and Recognition.T. Nijboer, R. Kanai, E. DEhaan & M. VandersMagt - 2008 - Consciousness and Cognition 17 (3):741-752.
    Colour has been shown to facilitate the recognition of scene images, but only when these images contain natural scenes, for which colour is ‘diagnostic’. Here we investigate whether colour can also facilitate memory for scene images, and whether this would hold for natural scenes in particular. In the first experiment participants first studied a set of colour and greyscale natural and man-made scene images. Next, the same images were presented, randomly mixed with a different set. Participants were asked to indicate (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Recognising the Forest, but Not the Trees: An Effect of Colour on Scene Perception and Recognition.Tanja C. W. Nijboer, Ryota Kanai, Edward H. F. de Haan & Maarten J. van der Smagt - 2008 - Consciousness and Cognition 17 (3):741-752.
    Colour has been shown to facilitate the recognition of scene images, but only when these images contain natural scenes, for which colour is ‘diagnostic’. Here we investigate whether colour can also facilitate memory for scene images, and whether this would hold for natural scenes in particular. In the first experiment participants first studied a set of colour and greyscale natural and man-made scene images. Next, the same images were presented, randomly mixed with a different set. Participants were asked to indicate (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Change Blindness Is Influenced by Both Contrast Energy and Subjective Importance Within Local Regions of the Image.Wietske Zuiderbaan, Jonathan van Leeuwen & Serge O. Dumoulin - 2017 - Frontiers in Psychology 8.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Visual Exploration Patterns of Human Figures in Action: An Eye Tracker Study with Art Paintings.Daniela Villani, Francesca Morganti, Pietro Cipresso, Simona Ruggi, Giuseppe Riva & Gabriella Gilli - 2015 - Frontiers in Psychology 6.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • Monocular Presentation Attenuates Change Blindness During the Use of Augmented Reality.Akihiko Kitamura, Yasunori Kinosada & Kazumitsu Shinohara - 2019 - Frontiers in Psychology 10.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • The Role of Working Memory Gating in Task Switching: A Procedural Version of the Reference-Back Paradigm.Yoav Kessler - 2017 - Frontiers in Psychology 8.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Change Blindness in Pigeons : The Effects of Change Salience and Timing.Walter T. Herbranson - 2015 - Frontiers in Psychology 6.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Visual Working Memory for Faces and Facial Expressions as a Useful “Tool” for Understanding Social and Affective Cognition.Filippo Gambarota & Paola Sessa - 2019 - Frontiers in Psychology 10.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • This is the Final Published Version Of.Lars Hall, Petter Johansson, Betty Tärning, Sverker Sikström & Thérèse Deutgen - 2010 - Cognition 117 (1):54-61.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  • Magic at the Marketplace: Choice Blindness for the Taste of Jam and the Smell of Tea.Lars Hall, Petter Johansson, Betty Tärning, Sverker Sikström & Thérèse Deutgen - 2010 - Cognition 117 (1):54-61.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   25 citations  
  • The Capacity of Visual Short-Term Memory Within and Between Hemifields.Jean-François Delvenne - 2005 - Cognition 96 (3):B79-B88.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  • The Allocation of Attention in Scene Perception.Melissa Vo - unknown
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Failures to See: Attentive Blank Stares Revealed by Change Blindness.Gideon P. Caplovitz, Robert Fendrich & Howard C. Hughes - 2008 - Consciousness and Cognition 17 (3):877-886.
    Change blindness illustrates a remarkable limitation in visual processing by demonstrating that substantial changes in a visual scene can go undetected. Because these changes can ultimately be detected using top–down driven search processes, many theories assign a central role to spatial attention in overcoming change blindness. Surprisingly, it has been reported that change blindness can occur during blink-contingent changes even when observers fixate the changing location [O’Regan, J. K., Deubel, H., Clark, J. J., & Rensink, R. A. . Picture changes (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  • Why Visual Attention and Awareness Are Different.Victor A. F. Lamme - 2003 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 7 (1):12-18.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   207 citations