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  1. Review of Sumner, *Welfare, Happiness, and Ethics*. [REVIEW]Bruce Brower - 1998 - Philosophical Review 107 (2):309.
    Despite being co-opted by economists and politicians for their own purposes, ‘welfare’ traditionally refers to well-being, and it is in this sense that L. W. Sumner understands the term. His book is a clear, careful, and well-crafted investigation into major theories of welfare, accompanied by a one-chapter defense of “welfarism,” the view that welfare is the only foundational value necessary for ethics. Sumner himself is attracted to utilitarianism, but he makes no commitment to it in this work, which will be (...)
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  • The Philosophy of Well-Being: An Introduction.Guy Fletcher - 2016 - Routledge.
    Well-being occupies a central role in ethics and political philosophy, including in major theories such as utilitarianism. It also extends far beyond philosophy: recent studies into the science and psychology of well-being have propelled the topic to centre stage, and governments spend millions on promoting it. We are encouraged to adopt modes of thinking and behaviour that support individual well-being or 'wellness'. What is well-being? Which theories of well-being are most plausible? In this rigorous and comprehensive introduction to the topic, (...)
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  • Liberalism, Community, and Culture.Will Kymlicka - 1989 - Oxford University Press.
    in a very different sense, to refer to the cultural community, or cultural structure, itself On this view, the cultural community continues to exist even when its members arc free to modify the character of the culture, should they find its traditional ...
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  • Principles of Biomedical Ethics.Tom L. Beauchamp - 1979 - Oxford University Press.
    This edition represents a thorough-going revision of what has become a classic text in biomedical ethics. Major structural changes mark the revision. The authors have added a new concluding chapter on methods that, along with its companion chapter on moral theory, emphasizes convergence across theories, coherence in moral justification, and the common morality. They have simplified the opening chapter on moral norms which introduces the framework of prima facie moral principles and ways to specify and balance them. Together with the (...)
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  • A Defense of Abortion.Judith Jarvis Thomson - 1971 - Philosophy and Public Affairs 1 (1):47-66.
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  • Medically Assisted Death.Robert Young - 2007 - Cambridge University Press.
    Does a competent person suffering from a terminal illness or enduring an otherwise burdensome existence, who considers his life no longer of value but is incapable of ending it, have a right to be helped to die? Should someone for whom further medical treatment would be futile be allowed to die regardless of expressing a preference to be given all possible treatment? These are some of the questions that are asked and answered in this wide-ranging discussion of both the morality (...)
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  • Liberalism, Perfectionism and Restraint.Steven Wall - 1998 - Cambridge University Press.
    Are liberalism and perfectionism compatible? In this study Steven Wall presents and defends a perfectionist account of political morality that takes issue with many currently fashionable liberal ideas but retains the strong liberal commitment to the ideal of personal autonomy. He begins by critically discussing the most influential version of anti-perfectionist liberalism, examining the main arguments that have been offered in its defence. He then clarifies the ideal of personal autonomy, presents an account of its value and shows that a (...)
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  • Welfare, Happiness, and Ethics.L. W. Sumner - 1996 - Oxford University Press.
    Moral philosophers agree that welfare matters. But they disagree about what it is, or how much it matters. In this vital new work, Wayne Sumner presents an original theory of welfare, investigating its nature and discussing its importance. He considers and rejects all notable theories of welfare, both objective and subjective, including hedonism and theories founded on desire or preference. His own theory connects welfare closely with happiness or life satisfaction. Reacting against the value pluralism that currently dominates moral philosophy, (...)
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  • Reconceptualizing Autonomy: A Relational Turn in Bioethics.Bruce Jennings - 2016 - Hastings Center Report 46 (3):11-16.
    History's judgment on the success of bioethics will not depend solely on the conceptual creativity and innovation in the field at the level of ethical and political theory, but this intellectual work is not insignificant. One important new development is what I shall refer to as the relational turn in bioethics. This development represents a renewed emphasis on the ideographic approach, which interprets the meaning of right and wrong in human actions as they are inscribed in social and cultural practices (...)
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  • Setting a Principled Boundary'? Euthanasia as a Response to 'Life Fatigue.Richard Huxtable & Maaike Möller - 2007 - Bioethics 21 (3):117–126.
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  • Autonomy, Interdependence, and Assisted Suicide: Respecting Boundaries/Crossing Lines.Anne Donchin - 2000 - Bioethics 14 (3):187–204.
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  • The Ethics of Euthanasia: Advocates' Perspectives.Jurriaan de Haan - 2002 - Bioethics 16 (2):154–172.
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  • Amputees by Choice: Body Integrity Identity Disorder and the Ethics of Amputation.Tim Bayne & Neil Levy - 2005 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 22 (1):75–86.
    In 1997, a Scottish surgeon by the name of Robert Smith was approached by a man with an unusual request: he wanted his apparently healthy lower left leg amputated. Although details about the case are sketchy, the would-be amputee appears to have desired the amputation on the grounds that his left foot wasn’t part of him – it felt alien. After consultation with psychiatrists, Smith performed the amputation. Two and a half years later, the patient reported that his life had (...)
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  • Restricting Physician‐Assisted Death to the Terminally Ill.Martin Gunderson & David J. Mayo - 2000 - Hastings Center Report 30 (6):17-23.
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  • The Constitution and Hastening Inevitable Death.Robert A. Sedler - 1993 - Hastings Center Report 23 (5):20-25.
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  • Is There a Duty to Die?John Hardwig - 1997 - Hastings Center Report 27 (2):34-42.
    When Richard Lamm made the statement that old people have a duty to die, it was generally shouted down or ridiculed. The whole idea is just too preposterous to entertain. Or too threatening. In fact, a fairly common argument against legalizing physician-assisted suicide is that if it were legal, some people might somehow get the idea that they have a duty to die. These people could only be the victims of twisted moral reasoning or vicious social pressure. It goes without (...)
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  • When Self‐Detertnination Runs Amok.Daniel Callahan - 1992 - Hastings Center Report 22 (2):52-55.
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  • An Introduction to Ill-Being.Shelly Kagan - 2014 - Oxford Studies in Normative Ethics 4:261-88.
    Typically, discussions of well-being focus almost exclusively on the positive aspects of well-being, those elements which directly contribute to a life going well, or better. It is generally assumed, without comment, that there is no need to explicitly discuss ill-being as well—that is, the part of the theory of well-being that specifies the elements which directly contribute to a life going badly, or less well—since (or so it is thought) this raises no special difficulties or problems. But this common assumption (...)
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  • Relational Autonomy, Self-Trust, and Health Care for Patients Who Are Oppressed.Carolyn McLeod & Susan Sherwin - 2000 - In Catriona Mackenzie & Natalie Stoljar (eds.), Relational Autonomy: Feminist Perspectives on Autonomy, Agency, and the Social Self. Oxford University Press.
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  • Imagining Oneself Otherwise.Catriona Mackenzie - 2000 - In Catriona Mackenzie & Natalie Stoljar (eds.), Relational Autonomy: Feminist Perspectives on Autonomy, Agency, and the Social Self. Oup Usa.
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  • Should a Legal Option of Physician-Assisted Death Include Those Who Are "Tired of Life"?Franklin G. Miller - 2016 - Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 59 (3):351-363.
    Recently, Canada’s National Post described in detail the death by lethal injection of a 94-year-old man, living alone, who had multiple medical problems but was not terminally ill. His son helped find a physician willing to administer lethal medication soon after his father told him he “wasn’t planning on adding another digit” to his age. The physician who complied with the request is a leading advocate for assisted death in Canada, who reportedly has been responsible for more than 30 life-terminating (...)
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  • Physician-Assisted Death with Limited Access to Palliative Care.Joaquín Barutta & Jochen Vollmann - 2015 - Journal of Medical Ethics 41 (8):652-654.
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  • Do We Need a Concept of Disease?Germund Hesslow - 1993 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 14 (1).
    The terms health, disease and illness are frequently used in clinical medicine. This has misled philosophers into believing that these concepts are important for clinical thinking and decision making. For instance, it is held that decisions about whether or not to treat someone or whether to relieve someone of moral responsibility depend on whether the person has a disease. In this paper it is argued that the crucial role of the disease concept is illusory. The health/disease distinction is irrelevant for (...)
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  • Do We Need a Concept of Disease?Germund Hesslow - 1993 - Theoretical Medicine: An International Journal for the Philosophy and Methodology of Medical Research and Practice 14 (1):1-14.
    The terms "health", "disease" and "illness" are frequently used in clinical medicine. This has misled philosophers into believing that these concepts are important for clinical thinking and decision making. For instance, it is held that decisions about whether or not to treat someone or whether to relieve someone of moral responsibility depend on whether the person has a disease. In this paper it is argued that the crucial role of the 'disease' concept is illusory. The health/disease distinction is irrelevant for (...)
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  • Book Review:Liberalism, Community, and Culture. Will Kymlicka. [REVIEW]James P. Sterba - 1992 - Ethics 103 (1):152-.
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  • Life's Dominion.Melissa Lane & Ronald Dworkin - 1994 - Philosophical Quarterly 44 (176):413.
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  • Deciding for Others.Gerald Dworkin, Allen E. Buchanan & Dan W. Brock - 1991 - Philosophical Quarterly 41 (162):118.
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