Switch to: Citations

Add references

You must login to add references.
  1. Democracy and Education.Addison W. Moore - 1916 - International Journal of Ethics 26 (4):547-550.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   104 citations  
  • After Virtue: A Study in Moral Theory.John Casey - 1983 - Philosophical Quarterly 33 (132):296-300.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   116 citations  
  • After Virtue: A Study in Moral Theory.Samuel Scheffler - 1983 - Philosophical Review 92 (3):443.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   512 citations  
  • Commentary on 'Inquiry is No Mere Conversation'.Susan T. Gardner - 2015 - Journal of Philosophy in Schools 2 (1).
    There is a long standing controversy in education as to whether education ought to be teacher- or student- centered. Interestingly, this controversy parallels the parent- vs. child-centered theoretical swings with regard to good parenting. One obvious difference between the two poles is the mode of communication. “Authoritarian” teaching and parenting strategies focus on the need of those who have much to learn to “do as they are told,” i.e. the authority talks, the child listens. “Non-authoritarian” strategies are anchored in the (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  • Practicing Philosophy of Childhood: Teaching in the Evolutionary Mode.David Kennedy - 2015 - Journal of Philosophy in Schools 2 (1).
    This article explores the necessary requirements for effective teacher facilitation of community of philosophical inquiry sessions among children, and suggests that the first and most important prerequisite is the capacity to listen to children, which in turn is based on a critical and reflective interrogation of one’s own philosophy of childhood —the set of beliefs and assumptions about children and childhood which adults tend to project onto real children. It argues that the most effective way to explore these assumptions is (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  • The Cognitive Attitude of Rational Trust.Karen Frost-Arnold - 2014 - Synthese 191 (9).
    I provide an account of the cognitive attitude of trust that explains the role trust plays in the planning of rational agents. Many authors have dismissed choosing to trust as either impossible or irrational; however, this fails to account for the role of trust in practical reasoning. A can have therapeutic, coping, or corrective reasons to trust B to ${\phi}$ , even in the absence of evidence that B will ${\phi}$ . One can choose to engage in therapeutic trust to (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   17 citations  
  • The Epistemic Challenge of Hearing Child’s Voice.Karin Murris - 2013 - Studies in Philosophy and Education 32 (3):245-259.
    Classical conceptual distinctions in philosophy of education assume an individualistic subjectivity and hide the learning that can take place in the space between child (as educator) and adult (as learner). Grounded in two examples from experience I develop the argument that adults often put metaphorical sticks in their ears in their educational encounters with children. Hearers’ prejudices cause them to miss out on knowledge offered by the child, but not heard by the adult. This has to do with how adults (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   16 citations  
  • Communities of Inquiry: Politics, Power and Group Dynamics.Gilbert Burgh & Mor Yorshansky - 2011 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 43 (5):436-452.
    The notion of a community of inquiry has been treated by many of its proponents as being an exemplar of democracy in action. We argue that the assumptions underlying this view present some practical and theoretical difficulties, particularly in relation to distribution of power among the members of a community of inquiry. We identify two presuppositions in relation to distribution of power that require attention in developing an educational model that is committed to deliberative democracy: (1) openness to inquiry and (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   11 citations  
  • Leadership for Creating a Thinking School at Buranda State School.L. Golding, C., Gurr, D., and Hinton & Clinton Golding - 2012 - Journal of Australian Council of Educational Leaders 18 (1):91-106.
    ABSTRACT: This article explores the role of principal leadership in creating a thinking school. It contributes to the school leadership literature by exploring the intersection of two important areas of study in education  school leadership and education for thinking  which is a particularly apt area of study, because effective school leadership is crucial if students are to learn to be critical and creative thinkers, yet this connection has not be widely investigated. We describe how one principal, Hinton, turned (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • Benefits of Collaborative Philosophical Inquiry in Schools.Stephan Millett & Alan Tapper - 2012 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 44 (5):546-567.
    In the past decade well-designed research studies have shown that the practice of collaborative philosophical inquiry in schools can have marked cognitive and social benefits. Student academic performance improves, and so too does the social dimension of schooling. These findings are timely, as many countries in Asia and the Pacific are now contemplating introducing Philosophy into their curricula. This paper gives a brief history of collaborative philosophical inquiry before surveying the evidence as to its effectiveness. The evidence is canvassed under (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   23 citations  
  • The Many Faces of Constructivist Discussion.Clinton Golding - 2011 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 43 (5):467-483.
    Although constructivist discussions in the classroom are often treated as if they were all of the same kind, in this paper I argue that there are subtle but important distinctions that need to be made. An analysis of these distinctions shows that there is a continuum of different constructivist discussions. At one extreme are teacher-directed discussions where students are led to construct the ‘correct’ understanding of a pre-decided conclusion; at the other extreme are unstructured discussions where students are free to (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  • Identity, Citizenship and Moral Education.Laurance Splitter - 2011 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 43 (5):484-505.
    Questions of identity such as ‘Who am I?’ are often answered by appeals to one or more affiliations with a specific nation (citizenship), culture, ethnicity, religion, etc. Taking as given the idea that identity over time—including identification and re-identification—for objects of a particular kind requires that there be criteria of identity appropriate to things of that kind, I argue that citizenship, as a ‘collectivist’ concept, does not generate such criteria for individual citizens, but that the concept person—which specifies the kind (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   10 citations  
  • Overcoming Relativism and Absolutism: Dewey's Ideals of Truth and Meaning in Philosophy for Children.Jennifer Bleazby - 2011 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 43 (5):453-466.
    Different notions of truth imply and encourage different ideals of thinking, knowledge, meaning, and learning. Thus, these concepts have fundamental importance for educational theory and practice. In this paper, I intend to draw out and clarify the notions of truth, knowledge and meaning that are implied by P4C's pedagogical ideals. There is some disagreement amongst P4C theorists and practitioners about whether the community of inquiry implies either relativism or absolutism. I will argue that both relativism and absolutism are incompatible with (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  • The Reasons of Trust.Pamela Hieronymi - 2008 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 86 (2):213 – 236.
    I argue to a conclusion I find at once surprising and intuitive: although many considerations show trust useful, valuable, important, or required, these are not the reasons for which one trusts a particular person to do a particular thing. The reasons for which one trusts a particular person on a particular occasion concern, not the value, importance, or necessity of trust itself, but rather the trustworthiness of the person in question in the matter at hand. In fact, I will suggest (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   41 citations  
  • Learning to Dialogue in Kindergarden, A Case Study.Marie-France Daniel - 2006 - Analytic Teaching and Philosophical Praxis 25 (3):23-52.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  • On Empirically Equivalent Systems of the World.Willard V. Quine - 1975 - Erkenntnis 9 (3):313-28.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   163 citations  
  • Thinking in Education.Matthew Lipman - 1992 - British Journal of Educational Studies 40 (2):187-189.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   95 citations  
  • Trust and Antitrust.Annette Baier - 1986 - Ethics 96 (2):231-260.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   290 citations  
  • Constructivist Experimental Philosophy on Well-Being and Virtue.Matthew Braddock - 2010 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 48 (3):295-323.
    What is the nature of human well-being? This paper joins the ancient debate by rejuvenating an ancient claim that is quite unfashionable among moral philosophers today, namely, the Aristotelian claim that moral virtue is (non-instrumentally) necessary for human well-being. Call it the Aristotelian Virtue Condition (AVC). This view can be revived for contemporary debate by a state-of-the-art approach that we might call constructivist experimental philosophy, which takes as its goal the achievement of a reasonable constructivist account of well-being and takes (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  • Trusting People.Annette C. Baier - 1992 - Philosophical Perspectives 6:137-153.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   13 citations  
  • Trust.Carolyn McLeod - 2011 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    A summary of the philosophical literature on trust.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   25 citations  
  • Thinking in Education.Matthew Lipman - 2003 - British Journal of Educational Studies 51 (3):303-305.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   133 citations  
  • How Can I Be Trusted?: A Virtue Theory of Trustworthiness.Nancy Nyquist Potter - 2002 - Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    This work examines the concept of trust in the light of virtue theory, and takes our responsibility to be trustworthy as central. Rather than thinking of trust as risk-taking, Potter views it as equally a matter of responsibility-taking. Her work illustrates that relations of trust are never independent from considerations of power, and that asking ourselves what we can do to be trustworthy allows us to move beyond adversarial trust relationships and toward a more democratic, just, and peaceful society.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   18 citations  
  • Aristotle's Ethics.Richard Kraut - 2008 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    Aristotle conceives of ethical theory as a field distinct from the theoretical sciences. Its methodology must match its subject matter—good action—and must respect the fact that in this field many generalizations hold only for the most part. We study ethics in order to improve our lives, and therefore its principal concern is the nature of human well-being. Aristotle follows Socrates and Plato in taking the virtues to be central to a well-lived life. Like Plato, he regards the ethical virtues (justice, (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   25 citations  
  • Ethics and the Community of Inquiry: Education for Deliberative Democracy.Gilbert Burgh, Terri Field & Mark Freakley - 2006 - South Melbourne: Cengage/Thomson.
    Ethics and the Community of Inquiry gets to the heart of democratic education and how best to achieve it. The book radically reshapes our understanding of education by offering a framework from which to integrate curriculum, teaching and learning and to place deliberative democracy at the centre of education reform. It makes a significant contribution to current debates on educational theory and practice, in particular to pedagogical and professional practice, and ethics education.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   22 citations  
  • Listening-as-Usual: A Response to Michael Hand.Karin Murris - 2015 - Studies in Philosophy and Education 34 (3):331-335.
    In her book Epistemic Injustice: Power and the Ethics of Knowing , Miranda Fricker introduces the helpful notion of “identity prejudice” as “a label for prejudices against people qua social type” . She focuses on race, class and gender, and Michael Hand in his article What Do Kids Know? A response to Karin Murris is indeed correct when he states that I have applied her arguments to age as a category of epistemic exclusion.I argue that among the usual contenders of (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations