Switch to: Citations

Add references

You must login to add references.
  1. A New Account of Thick Concepts.Andrew Payne - 2005 - Journal of Value Inquiry 39 (1):89-103.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  • Through Thick and Thin: Good and its Determinates.Christine Tappolet - 2004 - Dialectica 58 (2):207-221.
    What is the relation between the concept good and more specific or ‘thick’ concepts such as admirable or courageous? I argue that good or more precisely good pro tanto is a general concept, but that the relation between good pro tanto and the more specific concepts is not that of a genus to its species. The relation of an important class of specific evaluative concepts, which I call ‘affective concepts’, to good pro tanto is better understood as one between a (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   16 citations  
  • Thick Concepts.Debbie Roberts - 2013 - Philosophy Compass 8 (8):677-688.
    In ethics, aesthetics and increasingly in epistemology, a distinction is drawn between thick and thin evaluative concepts. A common characterisation of the distinction is that thin concepts have only evaluative content, whereas thick concepts combine evaluative and descriptive content. Because of this combination, it is again commonly thought that thick concepts have various distinctive powers including the power to undermine the distinction between fact and value. This paper discusses the accuracy of this view of the thick concepts debate, as well (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   19 citations  
  • Knowledge as a Thick Concept: Explaining Why the Gettier Problem Arises.Brent G. Kyle - 2013 - Philosophical Studies 165 (1):1-27.
    The Gettier problem has stymied epistemologists. But, whether or not this problem is resolvable, we still must face an important question: Why does the Gettier problem arise in the first place? So far, philosophers have seen it as either a problem peculiar to the concept of knowledge, or else an instance of a general problem about conceptual analysis. But I would like to steer a middle course. I argue that the Gettier problem arises because knowledge is a thick concept, and (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • Good and Evil.P. T. Geach - 1956 - Analysis 17 (2):33 - 42.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   139 citations  
  • Thick Concepts and Variability.Pekka Väyrynen - 2011 - Philosophers' Imprint 11:1-17.
    Some philosophers hold that so-called "thick" terms and concepts in ethics (such as 'cruel,' 'selfish,' 'courageous,' and 'generous') are contextually variable with respect to the valence (positive or negative) of the evaluations that they may be used to convey. Some of these philosophers use this variability claim to argue that thick terms and concepts are not inherently evaluative in meaning; rather their use conveys evaluations as a broadly pragmatic matter. I argue that one sort of putative examples of contextual variability (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  • Thick Concepts.Brent G. Kyle - 2016 - Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    A term expresses a thick concept if it expresses a specific evaluative concept that is also substantially descriptive. It is a matter of debate how this rough account should be unpacked, but examples can help to convey the basic idea. Thick concepts are often illustrated with virtue concepts like courageous and generous, action concepts like murder and betray, epistemic concepts like dogmatic and wise, and aesthetic concepts like gaudy and brilliant. These concepts seem to be evaluative, unlike purely descriptive concepts (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Courage, Cowardice, and Maher’s Misstep.Brent G. Kyle - 2017 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 47 (4):565-587.
    Could a Nazi soldier or terrorist be courageous? The Courage Problem asks us to answer this sort of question, and then to explain why people are reluctant to give this answer. The present paper sheds new light on the Courage Problem by examining a controversy sparked by Bill Maher, who claimed that the 9/11 terrorists’ acts were ‘not cowardly.’ It is shown that Maher's controversy is fundamentally related to the Courage Problem. Then, a unified solution to both problems is provided. (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Conversational Impliciture.Kent Bach - 1994 - Mind and Language 9 (2):124-162.
    Confusion in terms inspires confusion in concepts. When a relevant distinction is not clearly marked or not marked at all, it is apt to be blurred or even missed altogether in our thinking. This is true in any area of inquiry, pragmatics in particular. No one disputes that there are various ways in which what is communicated in an utterance can go beyond sentence meaning. The problem is to catalog the ways. It is generally recognized that linguistic meaning underdetermines speaker (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   228 citations  
  • The Shapelessness Hypothesis.Simon T. Kirchin - 2010 - Philosophers' Imprint 10.
    In this paper I discuss the shapelessnesss hypothesis, which is often referred to and relied on by certain sorts of ethical and evaluative cognitivist, and which they use primarily in arguing against a certain, influential form of noncognitivism. I aim to (i) set out exactly what the hypothesis is; (ii) show that its original and traditional use is left wanting; and (iii) show that there is some rehabilitation on offer that might have a chance of convincing neutrals.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   12 citations  
  • What Are Thick Concepts?Matti Eklund - 2011 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 41 (1):25-49.
    Many theorists hold that there is, among value concepts, a fundamental distinction between thin ones and thick ones. Among thin ones are concepts like good and right. Among concepts that have been regarded as thick are discretion, caution, enterprise, industry, assiduity, frugality, economy, good sense, prudence, discernment, treachery, promise, brutality, courage, coward, lie, gratitude, lewd, perverted, rude, glorious, graceful, exploited, and, of course, many others. Roughly speaking, thick concepts are value concepts with significant descriptive content. I will discuss a number (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   13 citations  
  • Depending on the Thick.Debbie Roberts - 2017 - Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 91 (1):197-220.
    The claim that the normative depends on the non-normative is just as entrenched in metanormative theory as the claim that the normative supervenes on the non-normative. It is widely held to be a genuine truism, a conceptual truth that operates as a constraint on competence with normative concepts. Call it the dependence constraint. I argue that this status is unwarranted. While it is true that the normative is dependent, it is not a genuine truism, or a conceptual truth, that it (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • Is Anything Just Plain Good?Mahrad Almotahari & Adam Hosein - 2015 - Philosophical Studies 172 (6):1485-1508.
    Geach and Thomson have argued that nothing is just plain good, because ‘good’ is, logically, an attributive adjective. The upshot, according to Geach and Thomson, is that consequentialism is unacceptable, since its very formulation requires a predicative use of ‘good’. Reactions to the argument have, for the most part, been uniform. Authors have converged on two challenging objections . First, although the logical tests that Geach and Thomson invoke clearly illustrate that ‘good’, as commonly used, is an attributive, they don’t (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   8 citations  
  • Normativity.J. J. Thomson - 2010 - Analysis 70 (4):713-715.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   105 citations  
  • Who Needs ‘Just Plain’ Goodness: A Reply to Almotahari and Hosein.Fergus Peace - 2017 - Philosophical Studies 174 (12):2991-3004.
    I address an argument in value theory which threatens to render nonsensical many debates in modern ethics. Almotahari and Hosein’s :1485–1508, 2015) argument against the property of goodness simpliciter is presented. I criticise the linguistic tests they use in their argument, suggesting they do not provide much support for their conclusion. I draw a weaker conclusion from their argument, and argue that defenders of goodness simpliciter have not responded adequately to this milder conclusion. I go on to argue that moral (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Ethics Without Principles.Jonathan Dancy - 2004 - Oxford University Press.
    In this much-anticipated book, Jonathan Dancy offers the only available full-scale treatment of particularism in ethics, a view with which he has been associated for twenty years. Dancy now presents particularism as the view that the possibility of moral thought and judgement does not in any way depend on an adequate supply of principles. He grounds this claim on a form of reasons-holism, holding that what is a reason in one case need not be any reason in another, and maintaining (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   412 citations  
  • The Emotive Meaning of Ethical Terms.Charles Leslie Stevenson - 1937 - Mind 46 (181):14-31.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   139 citations  
  • Väyrynen, Pekka. The Lewd, the Rude and the Nasty: A Study of Thick Concepts in Ethics.Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2013. Pp. 288. $49.95. [REVIEW]Debbie Roberts - 2015 - Ethics 125 (3):910-915.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Drawing the Line Between Meaning and Implicature—and Relating Both to Assertion.Scott Soames - 2008 - Noûs 42 (3):440-465.
    Paul Grice’s theory of Conversational Implicature is, by all accounts, one of the great achievements of the past fifty years -- both of analytic philosophy and of the empirical study of language. Its guiding idea is that constraints on the use of sentences, and information conveyed by utterances of them, arise not only from their conventional meanings (the information they semantically encode) but also from the communicative uses to which they are put. In his view, the overriding goal of most (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   20 citations  
  • The Excluded Middle: Semantic Minimalism Without Minimal Propositions. [REVIEW]Kent Bach - 2006 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 73 (2):435–442.
    Insensitive Semantics is mainly a protracted assault on semantic Contextualism, both moderate and radical. Cappelen and Lepore argue that Moderate Contextualism leads inevitably, like marijuana to heroin or masturbation to blindness, to Radical Contextualism and in turn that Radical Contextualism is misguided. Assuming that the only alternative to Contextualism is their Semantic Minimalism, they think they’ve given an indirect argument for it. But they overlook a third view, one that splits the difference between the other two. Like Contextualism it rejects (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   18 citations  
  • 'Thick' Concepts Revised.Stephan L. Burton - 1992 - Analysis 52 (1):28 - 32.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   8 citations  
  • Ecumenical Expressivism: Finessing Frege.Michael Ridge - 2006 - Ethics 116 (2):302-336.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   83 citations  
  • In Defense of Thick Concepts.Jonathan Dancy - 1995 - Midwest Studies in Philosophy 20 (1):263-279.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   24 citations  
  • Insensitive Semantics. A Defence of Semantic Minimalism and Speech Act Pluralism.Herman Cappelen & Ernest Lepore - 2008 - Critica 40 (120):148-152.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   121 citations  
  • Freedom and Reason.R. M. Hare - 1963 - Journal of Philosophy 61 (4):139-150.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   90 citations  
  • Thick Ethical Concepts.Pekka Väyrynen - 2016 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    Evaluative terms and concepts are often divided into “thin” and “thick”. We don’t evaluate actions and persons merely as good or bad, or right or wrong, but also as kind, courageous, tactful, selfish, boorish, and cruel. The latter evaluative concepts are "descriptively thick": their application somehow involves both evaluation and a substantial amount of non-evaluative description. This article surveys various attempts to answer four fundamental questions about thick terms and concepts. (1) A “combination question”: how exactly do thick terms and (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  • Shapelessness and the Thick.Debbie Roberts - 2011 - Ethics 121 (3):489-520.
    This article aims to clarify the view that thick concepts are irreducibly thick. I do this by putting the disentangling argument in its place and then setting out what nonreductivists about the thick are committed to. To distinguish the view from possible reductive accounts, defenders of irreducible thickness are, I argue, committed to the claim that evaluative concepts and properties are nonevaluatively shapeless. This in turn requires a commitment to (radical) holism and particularism. Nonreductivists are also committed to the claim (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   15 citations  
  • The Metaphysics of Meaning: Propositions and Possible Worlds.Scott Soames - 2010 - In Philosophy of Language. Princeton University Press. pp. 109-130.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  • How Are Thick Terms Evaluative?Brent G. Kyle - 2013 - Philosophers' Imprint 13:1-20.
    Ethicists are typically willing to grant that thick terms (e.g. ‘courageous’ and ‘murder’) are somehow associated with evaluations. But they tend to disagree about what exactly this relationship is. Does a thick term’s evaluation come by way of its semantic content? Or is the evaluation pragmatically associated with the thick term (e.g. via conversational implicature)? In this paper, I argue that thick terms are semantically associated with evaluations. In particular, I argue that many thick concepts (if not all) conceptually entail (...)
    Download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   9 citations  
  • From Thick to Thin: Two Moral Reduction Plans.Daniel Y. Elstein & Thomas Hurka - 2009 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 39 (4):pp. 515-535.
    Many philosophers of the last century thought all moral judgments can be expressed using a few basic concepts — what are today called ‘thin’ moral concepts such as ‘good,’ ‘bad,’ ‘right,’ and ‘wrong.’ This was the view, fi rst, of the non-naturalists whose work dominated the early part of the century, including Henry Sidgwick, G.E. Moore, W.D. Ross, and C.D. Broad. Some of them recognized only one basic concept, usually either ‘ought’ or ‘good’; others thought there were two. But they (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   30 citations  
  • Language, Truth and Logic.Alfred J. Ayer - 1937 - Erkenntnis 7:123-125.
    Download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   315 citations  
  • Review of 'The Lewd, the Rude, and the Nasty: A Study of Thick Concepts in Ethics' by Pekka Väyrynen. [REVIEW]Brent G. Kyle - 2015 - Philosophical Quarterly 65 (260):576-582.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Morality and Thick Concepts.Allan Gibbard & Simon Blackburn - 1992 - Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 66 (1):267 - 299.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   21 citations