Results for 'Allan Gibbard'

151 found
Order:
  1. Allan Gibbard Meaning and Normativity. Oxford University Press, 2012. xiv + 310 pp. isbn 9780199646074. [REVIEW]Daan Evers - 2015 - Theoria 81 (1):82-86.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  2. Gibbard on Quasi-realism and Global Expressivism.Huw Price - 2023 - Topoi 42 (3):683-697.
    In recent work Allan Gibbard claims to be both a local quasi-realist, in Blackburn’s sense, and a global expressivist. His local quasi-realism rests on an argument that for naturalistic discourse but not ethical discourse, the semantic relation of denotation and the causal relation of tracking can and should be identified; that denoting simply is tracking, for naturalistic vocabulary. I argue that Gibbard’s case for this conclusion is unconvincing, and poorly motivated by his own expressivist standards. I also (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  3. Can Edgington Gibbard counterfactuals?Adam Morton - 1997 - Mind 106 (421):101-105.
    A criticism of Dorothy Edgington's attempt to make Gibbard's problem for indicative conditionals apply to counterfactuals.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  4. Skookumchuck, Kiidk’yaas, Gibbard: normativity, meaning, and idealization.Adam Morton - 2014 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 44 (1):148-161.
    I tried to tease out what Gilbert means by "normative". It isn't obvious. I conclude that assumptions about ideal agents – not just ideal in the sense of error-free but also ideal in the sense of unlimited – and assumptions about ideal placement of oneself in another person's situation, are essential to what he means. I conclude that what he says is very plausible given these assumptions, though they themselves are very problematic. Especially problematic is the idea of an unlimited (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  5. Intuitions about Disagreement Do Not Support the Normativity of Meaning.Derek Baker - 2016 - Dialectica 70 (1):65-84.
    Allan Gibbard () argues that the term ‘meaning’ expresses a normative concept, primarily on the basis of arguments that parallel Moore's famous Open Question Argument. In this paper I argue that Gibbard's evidence for normativity rests on idiosyncrasies of the Open Question Argument, and that when we use related thought experiments designed to bring out unusual semantic intuitions associated with normative terms we fail to find such evidence. These thought experiments, moreover, strongly suggest there are basic requirements (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  6. Higher-Order Epistemic Attitudes and Intellectual Humility.Allan Hazlett - 2012 - Episteme 9 (3):205-223.
    This paper concerns would-be necessary connections between doxastic attitudes about the epistemic statuses of your doxastic attitudes, or ‘higher-order epistemic attitudes’, and the epistemic statuses of those doxastic attitudes. I will argue that, in some situations, it can be reasonable for a person to believe p and to suspend judgment about whether believing p is reasonable for her. This will set the stage for an account of the virtue of intellectual humility, on which humility is a matter of your higher-order (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   89 citations  
  7. Unrealistic Fictions.Allan Hazlett & Christy Mag Uidhir - 2011 - American Philosophical Quarterly 48 (1):33--46.
    In this paper, we develop an analysis of unrealistic fiction that captures the everyday sense of ‘unrealistic’. On our view, unrealistic fictions are a species of inconsistent fictions, but fictions for which such inconsistency, given the supporting role we claim played by genre, needn’t be a critical defect. We first consider and reject an analysis of unrealistic fiction as fiction that depicts or describes unlikely events; we then develop our own account and make an initial statement of it: unrealistic fictions (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  8. Factive Presupposition and the Truth Condition on Knowledge.Allan Hazlett - 2012 - Acta Analytica 27 (4):461-478.
    In “The Myth of Factive Verbs” (Hazlett 2010), I had four closely related goals. The first (pp. 497-99, p. 522) was to criticize appeals to ordinary language in epistemology. The second (p. 499) was to criticize the argument that truth is a necessary condition on knowledge because “knows” is factive. The third (pp. 507-19) – which was the intended means of achieving the first two – was to defend a semantics for “knows” on which <S knows p> can be true (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   33 citations  
  9. Entitlement and mutually recognized reasonable disagreement.Allan Hazlett - 2013 - Episteme (1):1-25.
    Most people not only think that it is possible for reasonable people to disagree, but that it is possible for people to recognize that they are parties to a reasonable disagreement. The aim of this paper is to explain how such mutually recognized reasonable disagreements are possible. I appeal to an which implies a form of relativism about reasonable belief, based on the idea that whether a belief is reasonable for a person can depend on the fact that she has (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   29 citations  
  10. Towards Social Accounts of Testimonial Asymmetries.Allan Hazlett - 2017 - Noûs 51 (1):49–73.
    there seems to be some kind of asymmetry, at least in some cases, between moral testimony and non-moral testimony, between aesthetic testimony and non-aesthetic testimony, and between religious testimony and non-religious testimony. In these domains, at least in some cases, we object to deference, and for this reason expect people to form their beliefs on non-testimonial grounds, in a way that we do not object to deference in paradigm cases of testimonial knowledge. Our philosophical puzzle is therefore: what explains these (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   13 citations  
  11. Can There Be Global Justice?Allan Layug - 2008 - Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 50:407-417.
    This paper argues that the possibility of global justice is premised on the solutions of three-fold interrelated problem: (1) problem of heterogeneity, (2) problem of inequality, (3) problem of realpolitik. The problem of heterogeneity questions the assumed globality equated as universality or commonality underpinning global justice in view of the empirical human diversity and plurality that cannot be assumed away by the desirability of the normativity of global justice. The problem of inequality highlights the ineradicability of global inequality as a (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  12. False Intellectual Humility.Allan Hazlett - 2021 - In Mark Alfano, Michael Patrick Lynch & Alessandra Tanesini (eds.), The Routledge Handbook of the Philosophy of Humility. New York, NY: Routledge.
    This chapter explores a species of false modesty, false intellectual humility, which is defined as affected or pretended intellectual humility concealing intellectual arrogance. False intellectual humility is situated in a virtue epistemological framework, where it is contrasted with intellectual humility, understood as excellence in self-attribution of intellectual weakness. False intellectual humility characteristically takes the form of insincere expressions of ignorance or uncertainty – as when dogmatically committed conspiracy theorists insist that they just want to know what’s going on – and, (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  13. Non‐Moral Evil.Allan Hazlett - 2012 - Midwest Studies in Philosophy 36 (1):18-34.
    There is, I shall assume, such a thing as moral evil (more on which below). My question is whether is also such a thing as non-moral evil, and in particular whether there are such things as aesthetic evil and epistemic evil. More exactly, my question is whether there is such a thing as moral evil but not such a thing as non-moral evil, in some sense that reveals something special about the moral, as opposed to such would-be non-moral domains as (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   10 citations  
  14. Understanding and Structure.Allan Hazlett - 2017 - In Stephen R. Grimm (ed.), Making Sense of the World: New Essays on the Philosophy of Understanding. New York, NY, United States of America: Oxford University Press.
    In the Phaedrus, Socreates sympathetically describes the ability “to cut up each kind according to its species along its natural joints, and to try not to splinter any part, as a bad butcher might do.” (265e) In contemporary philosophy, Ted Sider (2009, 2011) defends the same idea. As I shall put it, Plato and Sider’s idea is that limning structure is an epistemic goal. My aim in this paper is to articulate and defend this idea. First, I’ll articulate the notion (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   8 citations  
  15. A Task that Exceeded the Technology: Early Applications of the Computer to the Lunar Three-body Problem.Allan Olley - 2018 - Revue de Synthèse 139 (3-4):267-288.
    The lunar Three-Body problem is a famously intractable problem of Newtonian mechanics. The demand for accurate predictions of lunar motion led to practical approximate solutions of great complexity, constituted by trigonometric series with hundreds of terms. Such considerations meant there was demand for high speed machine computation from astronomers during the earliest stages of computer development. One early innovator in this regard was Wallace J. Eckert, a Columbia University professor of astronomer and IBM researcher. His work illustrates some interesting features (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  16. Investigating modes of being in the world: an introduction to Phenomenologically grounded qualitative research.Allan Køster & Anthony Vincent Fernandez - 2021 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 22 (1):149-169.
    In this article, we develop a new approach to integrating philosophical phenomenology with qualitative research. The approach uses phenomenology’s concepts, namely existentials, rather than methods such as the epoché or reductions. We here introduce the approach to both philosophers and qualitative researchers, as we believe that these studies are best conducted through interdisciplinary collaboration. In section 1, we review the debate over phenomenology’s role in qualitative research and argue that qualitative theorists have not taken full advantage of what philosophical phenomenology (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   17 citations  
  17. Intellectual Pride.Allan Hazlett - 2017 - In Joseph Adam Carter & Emma C. Gordon (eds.), The Moral Psychology of Pride. London: Rowman & Littlefield.
    Intellectual pride is pride about intellectual matters – for example, knowledge about what you know, about your intellectual virtues, or about your intellectual achievements. It is the opposite of intellectual humility (e.g. knowledge about what you don’t know, about your intellectual vices, or about your intellectual failures). In this paper I will advocate for intellectual pride by explaining its importance in the contexts of education (where a lack of pride threatens to undermine motivation), intellectual marginalization (where a lack of pride (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  18. Testimony, Understanding, and Art Criticism.Allan Hazlett - forthcoming - In Christy Mag Uidhir (ed.), Philosophy and Art: New Essays at the Intersection. Oxford University Press.
    I present a puzzle – the “puzzle of aesthetic testimony” – along with a solution to it that appeals to the impossibility of testimonial understanding. I'll criticize this solution by defending the possibility of testimonial understanding, including testimonial aesthetic understanding.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  19. Plan‐based expressivism and innocent mistakes.Steve Daskal - 2009 - Ethics 119 (2):310-335.
    In this paper I develop an objection to the version of expressivism found in Allan Gibbard’s book Thinking How to Live, and I suggest that the difficulty faced by Gibbard’s analysis is symptomatic of a problem for expressivism more generally. The central claim is that Gibbard’s expressivism is unable to account for certain normative judgments that arise in the process of evaluating cases of innocent mistakes. I begin by considering a type of innocent mistake that (...)’s view is able to capture, one that can occur in situations in which our judgments of what it makes sense to do come apart from our judgments of what it makes sense to plan to do. Whether or not such mistakes are possible is a normative question, and I argue against Gibbard that we should adopt a normative stance that rules out such mistakes. This leads me to consider a second type of innocent mistake, one that can arise when an agent is constituted in such a way as to be incapable of recognizing the appropriate course of action. I argue here that our full normative assessment of the situation incorporates judgments that cannot be captured by Gibbard’s expressivism. I conclude by suggesting that any form of expressivism that shares Gibbard’s commitment to account for an intimate tie between normative judgments and action will face a similar problem. (shrink)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  20. Qua-lification.Allan Bäck - unknown
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  21. Skepticism.Allan Hazlett - 2019 - In Heather Battaly (ed.), The Routledge Handbook of Virtue Epistemology.
    In this chapter I sympathetically consider the idea that skepticism is an epistemic virtue. I argue that this depends on whether skepticism is admirable, and articulate three defenses of skepticism as admirable: a Pyrrhonian defense (on which skepticism leads to tranquility), a Cartesian defense (on which skepticism is prophylactic against error), and a liberal defense (on which skepticism counteracts dogmatism and closed-mindedness). I give the liberal defense the most attention: I distinguish skepticism from several species of dogmatism that are sometimes (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  22. Understanding and Testimony.Allan Hazlett - 2024 - In Jennifer Lackey & Aidan McGlynn (eds.), Oxford Handbook of Social Epistemology. Oxford University Press.
    Can understanding be transmitted by testimony, in the same sense that propositional knowledge can be transmitted by testimony? Some contemporary philosophers – call them testimonial understanding pessimists – say No, and others – call them testimonial understanding optimists – say Yes. In this chapter I will articulate testimonial understanding pessimism (§1) and consider some arguments for it (§2).
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  23. Two Aristotelian Theories of Existential Import.Allan Bäck - 2011 - Aportía 2:4-24.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  24. Process, structure, and form: An evolutionary transpersonal psychology of consciousness.Allan Combs & Stanley Krippner - 2003 - International Journal of Transpersonal Studies 22 (1):47-60.
    In the spirit of William James, we present a process view of human consciousness. Our approach, however, follows upon Charles Tart’s original systems theory analysis of states of consciousness, although it differs in its reliance on the modern sciences of complexity, especially dynamical systems theory and its emphasis on process and evolution. We argue that consciousness experience is constructive in the sense that it is the result of ongoing self-organizing and self-creating processes in the mind and body. These processes follow (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  25. Populism, Expertise, and Intellectual Autonomy.Allan Hazlett - forthcoming - In M. Berhow, G. Petersen & G. Tsakiridis (eds.), Engaging Populism: Democracy and the Intellectual Virtues. Palgrave.
    Populism, as I shall understand the term here, is a style of political rhetoric that posits a Manichean conflict between the people and corrupt elites. In the present decade, populism has played a particularly salient role in the politics of the United States and Europe. Moreover, populism is commonly associated with a kind of skepticism about expertise, on which the opinions of non- experts are to be preferred to any expert consensus. In light of all this, populist expertise skepticism appears (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  26. Expressivism and Convention-Relativism about Epistemic Discourse.Allan Hazlett - forthcoming - In A. Fairweather & O. Flanagan (eds.), Naturalizing Epistemic Virtue. Cambridge University Press.
    Consider the claim that openmindedness is an epistemic virtue, the claim that true belief is epistemically valuable, and the claim that one epistemically ought to cleave to one’s evidence. These are examples of what I’ll call “ epistemic discourse.” In this paper I’ll propose and defend a view called “convention-relativism about epistemic discourse.” In particular, I’ll argue that convention-relativismis superior to its main rival, expressivism about epistemic discourse. Expressivism and conventionalism both jibe with anti-realism about epistemic normativity, which is motivated (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  27. The Ki to Strength in the Martial Arts.Allan Bäck - 2010 - In M. Holowchak & Terry Todd (eds.), Philosophical Reflections on Physical Strength. Mellen Press. pp. 91-114.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  28. Insights of Avicenna.Allan Bäck - 2009 - In A. Storck (ed.), Aristotelis analytica posteriora: estudos acerca da rexepacao medieval dos segundos analiticos. Porto Algere: Linus Editores. pp. 111-148.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  29. Truthfulness without Truth.Allan Hazlett - 2002 - Journal of Philosophical Research 45:115-131.
    It is natural to think that the badness of false belief explains the badness of lying. In this paper, I argue against this: I argue that the badness of false belief does not explain the badness of lying and that, given a popular account of the badness of lying, the badness of false belief is orthogonal to the badness of lying.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  30. Avicenna the Commentator.Allan Bäck - 2008 - In Lloyd Newton (ed.), Medieval commentaries on Aristotle's Categories. Boston: Brill. pp. 31-71.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  31. Islamic Logic.Allan Bäck - 2008 - In S. Rahman, T. Street & H. Tahiri (eds.), The Unity of Science in the Islamic Tradition. Berlin:
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  32. A Gricean Approach to the Gettier Problem.Allan Hazlett - manuscript
    David Lewis maintained that epistemological contextualism (on which the truth-conditions for utterances of “S knows p” change in different contexts depending on the salient “alternative possibilities”) could solve the problem of skepticism as well as the Gettier problem. Contextualist approaches to skepticism have become commonplace, if not orthodox, in epistemology. But not so for contextualist approaches to the Gettier problem: the standard approach to this has been to add an “anti-luck” condition to the analysis of knowledge.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  33. Developing the Silver Economy and Related Government Resources for Seniors: A Position Paper.Maristella Agosti, Moira Allan, Ágnes Bene, Kathryn L. Braun, Luigi Campanella, Marek Chałas, Cheah Tuck Wing, Dragan Čišić, George Christodoulou, Elísio Manuel de Sousa Costa, Lucija Čok, Jožica Dorniž, Aleksandar Erceg, Marzanna Farnicka, Anna Grabowska, Jože Gričar, Anne-Marie Guillemard, An Hermans, Helen Hirsh Spence, Jan Hively, Paul Irving, Loredana Ivan, Miha Ješe, Isaac Kabelenga, Andrzej Klimczuk, Jasna Kolar Macur, Annigje Kruytbosch, Dušan Luin, Heinrich C. Mayr, Magen Mhaka-Mutepfa, Marian Niedźwiedziński, Gyula Ocskay, Christine O’Kelly, Nancy Papalexandri, Ermira Pirdeni, Tine Radinja, Anja Rebolj, Gregory M. Sadlek, Raymond Saner, Lichia Saner-Yiu, Bernhard Schrefler, Ana Joao Sepúlveda, Giuseppe Stellin, Dušan Šoltés, Adolf Šostar, Paul Timmers, Bojan Tomšič, Ljubomir Trajkovski, Bogusława Urbaniak, Peter Wintlev-Jensen & Valerie Wood-Gaiger - manuscript
    The precarious rights of senior citizens, especially those who are highly educated and who are expected to counsel and guide the younger generations, has stimulated the creation internationally of advocacy associations and opinion leader groups. The strength of these groups, however, varies from country to country. In some countries, they are supported and are the focus of intense interest; in others, they are practically ignored. For this is reason we believe that the creation of a network of all these associations (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  34. Intellectual Trust and the Marketplace of Ideas.Allan Hazlett - 2021 - In Michael P. Lynch & Allesandra Tanesini (eds.), Polarization, Arrogance, and Dogmatism: Philosophical Perspectives.
    Here is a familiar liberal argument: just as it can be beneficial to establish a marketplace, in which producers of goods freely compete for the custom of consumers, it can be beneficial to establish a “marketplace of ideas,” in which defenders of ideas freely compete for the acceptance of those ideas by others. This paper is about the preconditions for the proper functioning of liberal marketplaces, and of marketplaces of ideas in particular. I will argue that, just as the proper (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  35. A Partir da Causalidade em Davidson: Uma Discussão Acerca dos Relata e Leis da Natureza.Allan Patrick de Lucena Costa - 2007 - Dissertation, Universidade Federal da ParaíBa, Brazil
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  36. Understanding What We Ought and Shall Do: A Hyperstate Semantics for Descriptive, Prescriptive, and Intentional Sentences.Preston Stovall - 2021 - In Ladislav Koreň, Hans Bernhard Schmid, Preston Stovall & Leo Townsend (eds.), Groups, Norms and Practices: Essays on Inferentialism and Collective Intentionality. Cham: Springer. pp. 215-238.
    This essay is part of a larger project aimed at making sense of rational thought and agency as part of the natural world. It provides a semantic framework for thinking about the contents of: 1) descriptive thoughts and sentences having a representational or mind-to-world direction of fit, and which manifest our capacity for theoretical rationality; and 2) prescriptive and intentional sentences having an expressive or world-to-mind direction of fit, and which manifest our capacity for practical rationality. I use a modified (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  37. ‘What’s Teleology Got To Do With It?’ A Reinterpretation of Aristotle’s Generation of Animals V.Mariska Leunissen & Allan Gotthelf - 2010 - Phronesis 55 (4):325-356.
    Despite the renewed interest in Aristotle’s Generation of Animals in recent years, the subject matter of GA V, its preferred mode(s) of explanation, and its place in the treatise as a whole remain misunderstood. Scholars focus on GA I-IV, which explain animal generation in terms of efficient-final causation, but dismiss GA V as a mere appendix, thinking it to concern (a) individual, accidental differences among animals, which are (b) purely materially necessitated, and (c) are only tangentially related to the topics (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  38. Fitting Inconsistency and Reasonable Irresolution.Simon D. Feldman & Allan Hazlett - 2020 - In Berit Brogaard & Dimitria Electra Gatzia (eds.), The Philosophy and Psychology of Ambivalence: Being of Two Minds. New York, NY: Routledge.
    The badness of having conflicting emotions is a familiar theme in academic ethics, clinical psychology, and commercial self-help, where emotional harmony is often put forward as an ideal. Many philosophers give emotional harmony pride of place in their theories of practical reason.1 Here we offer a defense of a particular species of emotional conflict, namely, ambivalence. We articulate an conception of ambivalence, on which ambivalence is unresolved inconsistent desire (§1) and present a case of appropriate ambivalence (§2), before considering two (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  39. La tecnopolítica de las multitudes inteligentes: un análisis del #25S en Twitter.Allan Marquez, Gabriel Herkenhoff Coelho Moura & Fábio Malini - 2014 - In Javier Toret, Eunate Serrano & Antonio Calleja-López (eds.), 15MP2P. Una mirada transdisciplinar del 15M. Universitat Oberta de Catalunya.
    La fuerza del movimiento español se debe bastante a su constitución como tecnopolítica. La capacidad demostrada de construir dispositivos que transitan entre la calle y la red torna el movimiento potente en ambos los espacios y tiene ayudado en la movilización de la sociedad española. Ese uso táctico de las nuevas tecnologías de comunicación y de la internet permiten que el #15M forme una especie de consciencia de red, o mejor, la subjetividad de red hace parte de la actuación dentro (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  40. Propositional Logic – A Primer.Leslie Allan - manuscript
    This tutorial is for beginners wanting to learn the basics of propositional logic; the simplest of the formal systems of logic. Leslie Allan introduces students to the nature of arguments, validity, formal proofs, logical operators and rules of inference. With many examples, Allan shows how these concepts are employed through the application of three different methods for proving the formal validity of arguments.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  41. Multi‐Peer Disagreement and the Preface Paradox.Kenneth Boyce & Allan Hazlett - 2014 - Ratio 29 (1):29-41.
    The problem of multi-peer disagreement concerns the reasonable response to a situation in which you believe P1 … Pn and disagree with a group of ‘epistemic peers’ of yours, who believe ∼P1 … ∼Pn, respectively. However, the problem of multi-peer disagreement is a variant on the preface paradox; because of this the problem poses no challenge to the so-called ‘steadfast view’ in the epistemology of disagreement, on which it is sometimes reasonable to believe P in the face of peer disagreement (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  42.  61
    Malraux, Art, and Modernity.Derek Allan - forthcoming - la Revue des Lettres Modernes 2024.
    For Malraux, modernity in art is not only about modern art; it is also about the birth of what he aptly terms “the first universal world of art.” This event was a consequence of the process of metamorphosis which is central to Malraux’s account of the relationship between art and time. The article explains this event, noting also that modern aesthetics has not provided an explanation.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  43. Can Utilitarianism Ground Human Rights?Leslie Allan - manuscript
    Leslie Allan demonstrates how human rights are unproblematic for utilitarian moral theory and how, upon consideration, utilitarianism turns out to be the best theory for justifying human rights. Using case studies of historical and contemporary human rights conventions and recent psychological research, he argues how our concept of human rights is founded on the satisfaction of fundamental human needs and the consequences for human happiness.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  44. Authenticity and Self‐Knowledge.Simon D. Feldman & Allan Hazlett - 2013 - Dialectica 67 (2):157-181.
    We argue that the value of authenticity does not explain the value of self-knowledge. There are a plurality of species of authenticity; in this paper we consider four species: avoiding pretense (section 2), Frankfurtian wholeheartedness (section 3), existential self-knowledge (section 4), and spontaneity (section 5). Our thesis is that, for each of these species, the value of (that species of) authenticity does not (partially) explain the value of self-knowledge. Moreover, when it comes to spontaneity, the value of (that species of) (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  45. A Necessary Transgression: Malraux, Art, and History.Derek Allan - 2023 - la Revue des Lettres Modernes 2023 – 9. L’Homme Précaire Et la Littérature 9:135 - 149.
    Modern aesthetics is divided into two branches – the Anglo-American and the Continental. A major cause of this division is their divergent views about the place of history in aesthetics, the first tending to minimize historical considerations, while the second readily embraces them. This article explores the place of history in André Malraux's theory of art and argues that his thinking quickly resolves this long-standing disagreement. (This text is a translation of the published French version.).
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  46. Norm-expressivism and regress.Tanyi Attila - 2017 - South African Journal of Philosophy 36 (3):362-376.
    This paper aims to investigate Allan Gibbard’s norm-expressivist account of normativity. In particular, the aim is to see whether Gibbard’s theory is able to account for the normativity of reason-claims. For this purpose, I first describe how I come to targeting Gibbard’s theory by setting out the main tenets of quasi-realism cum expressivism. After this, I provide a detailed interpretation of the relevant parts of Gibbard’s theory. I argue that the best reading of his account (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  47. A Defence of Emotivism.Leslie Allan - manuscript
    As a non-cognitivist analysis of moral language, Charles Stevenson's sophisticated emotivism is widely regarded by moral philosophers as a substantial improvement over its historical antecedent, radical emotivism. None the less, it has come in for its share of criticism. In this essay, Leslie Allan responds to the key philosophical objections to Stevenson's thesis, arguing that the criticisms levelled against his meta-ethical theory rest largely on a too hasty reading of his works.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  48. Is Morality Subjective?Leslie Allan - manuscript
    Subjectivists claim that the absence of a theological or metaphysical grounding to moral judgements renders them all as simply statements about our subjective wants and preferences. Leslie Allan argues that the subjectivists' case rests on a misunderstanding of the nature of moral objectivity. He presents the view that subjectivists mistakenly counterpoise the ideal of moral objectivity with the expression of individual preferences. Being objective in moral deliberation, Allan argues, should be regarded instead as the antithesis of parochial and (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  49. The Problem of Evil.Leslie Allan - manuscript
    The existence of evil, pain and suffering is considered by many philosophers to be the most vexed question concerning the existence of an omnipotent, omniscient and morally perfect deity. Why would a loving God permit wanton acts of cruelty and misery on the scale witnessed throughout human history? In this essay, Leslie Allan evaluates four common theistic responses to this problem, highlighting the benefits and challenges faced by each approach. He concludes with a critical examination of a theistic defence (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  50. Laclos and the Dark Side of the Enlightenment.Derek Allan - manuscript
    The conventional view is that Enlightenment thinkers all believed that the fruits of Reason would always be beneficial. Is this accurate? Laclos's celebrated novel "Les Liaisons dangereueses", published in 1782, provides a perspective on the world of Reason that certainly does not square with that view. Working at the level of individual psychology, Reason in Laclos's novel divides the world into the strong and the weak – more specifically, the astute and the naïve. It defines human worth in terms of (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
1 — 50 / 151