Switch to: Citations

Add references

You must login to add references.
  1. The Rationality of Emotion.Robert M. Gordon - 1991 - Philosophical Review 100 (2):284.
    How should we understand the emotional rationality? This first part will explore two models of cognition and analogy strategies, test their intuition about the emotional desire. I distinguish between subjective and objective desire, then presents with a feeling from the "paradigm of drama" export semantics, here our emotional repertoire is acquired all the learned, and our emotions in the form of an object is fixed. It is pretty well in line with the general principles of rationality, especially the lowest reasonable (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   66 citations  
  • How We Hope: A Moral Psychology.Adrienne Martin - 2014 - Princeton University Press.
    What exactly is hope and how does it influence our decisions? In How We Hope, Adrienne Martin presents a novel account of hope, the motivational resources it presupposes, and its function in our practical lives. She contends that hoping for an outcome means treating certain feelings, plans, and imaginings as justified, and that hope thereby involves sophisticated reflective and conceptual capacities. Martin develops this original perspective on hope--what she calls the "incorporation analysis"--in contrast to the two dominant philosophical conceptions of (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   42 citations  
  • The Varieties of Wonder.Patrick Sherry - 2013 - Philosophical Investigations 36 (4):340-354.
    Although wonder is a response to what is extraordinary or regarded as such, this covers a variety of things. Hence, wonder covers a spectrum from mere surprise or puzzlement to stronger responses like dread or amazement; moreover, it is often linked to other powerful responses like fear or admiration, and it can lead people into many pursuits and areas of reflection. I look at the variety of the objects of wonder, and of the neighbouring responses and conceptual connections found here, (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  • Awe: An Aristotelian Analysis of a Non-Aristotelian Virtuous Emotion.Kristján Kristjánsson - 2017 - Philosophia 45 (1):125-142.
    While interest in the emotion of awe has surged in psychology, philosophers have yet to devote a single self-standing article to awe’s conceptual contours and moral standing. The present article aims to rectify this imbalance and begin to make up for the unwarranted philosophical neglect. In order to do so, awe is given the standard Aristotelian treatment to uncover its conceptual contours and moral relevance. Aristotelianism typically provides the most useful entry point to ‘size up’ any emotion – more problematically (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  • Loss of Affect in Intellectual Activity.Peter Goldie - 2012 - Emotion Review 4 (2):122-126.
    In this article I will consider how loss of affect in our intellectual lives, through depression for example, can be as debilitating as loss of affect elsewhere in our lives. This will involve showing that there are such things as intellectual emotions, that their role in intellectual activity is not merely as an aid to the intellect, and that loss of affect changes not only one’s motivations, but also one’s overall evaluative take on the world.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  • Awe or Envy: Herder Contra Kant on the Sublime.Rachel Zuckert - 2003 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 61 (3):217–232.
    I present and evaluate Johann Gottfried Herder's criticisms of Kant's account of the sublime and Herder's own theory of the sublime, as presented in his work, Kalligone. Herder's account and criticisms ought to be taken seriously, I argue, as (respectively) a non-reductive, naturalist aesthetics of the sublime, and as illuminating the metaphysical, moral, and political presuppositions underlying Kant's (and Burke's) accounts of the sublime.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   13 citations  
  • Emotions and Formal Objects.Fabrice Teroni - 2007 - Dialectica 61 (3):395-415.
    It is often claimed that emotions are linked to formal objects. But what are formal objects? What roles do they play? According to some philosophers, formal objects are axiological properties which individuate emotions, make them intelligible and give their correctness conditions. In this paper, I evaluate these claims in order to answer the above questions. I first give reasons to doubt the thesis that formal objects individuate emotions. Second, I distinguish different ways in which emotions are intelligible and argue that (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   93 citations  
  • Action, Emotion and Will.Keith S. Donnellan - 1965 - Philosophical Review 74 (4):526.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   117 citations  
  • The Expression of Feeling in Imagination.Richard Moran - 1994 - Philosophical Review 103 (1):75-106.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   115 citations  
  • The Nature of Awe: Elicitors, Appraisals, and Effects on Self-Concept.Michelle N. Shiota, Dacher Keltner & Amanda Mossman - 2007 - Cognition and Emotion 21 (5):944-963.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   56 citations  
  • Hume's Cognitive Theory of Pride.Donald Davidson - 1976 - Journal of Philosophy 73 (19):744-757.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   28 citations  
  • Causes, Objects, and Producers of the Emotions.Keith S. Donnellan - 1970 - Journal of Philosophy 67 (November):947-950.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  • Arguments as Abstract Objects.Paul Simard Smith, Andrei Moldovan & G. C. Goddu - unknown
    In recent discussions concerning the definition of argument, it has been maintained that the word ‘argument’ exhibits the process-product ambiguity, or an act/object ambi-guity. Drawing on literature on lexical ambiguity we argue that ‘argument’ is not ambiguous. The term ‘argument’ refers to an object, not to a speech act. We also examine some of the important implications of our argument by considering the question: what sort of abstract objects are arguments?
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   14 citations  
  • A Special Way of Being Afraid.Kathy Behrendt - 2010 - Philosophical Psychology 23 (5):669-682.
    I am interested in fear of non-existence, which is often discussed in terms of fear one’s own death, or as it is sometimes called, fear of death as such. This form of fear has been denied by some philosophers. Cognitive theories of the emotions have particular trouble in dealing with it, granting it a status that is simultaneously paradigmatic yet anomalous with respect to fear in general. My paper documents these matters, and considers a number of responses. I provide examples (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  • Upheavals of Thought: The Intelligence of Emotions.Martha C. Nussbaum - 2004 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 68 (2):458-464.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   195 citations  
  • Action, Emotion and Will.Anthony Kenny - 1963 - Philosophy 39 (149):277-278.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   64 citations  
  • Eighteenth Century British Aesthetics.James Shelley - 2018 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    18th-century British aesthetics addressed itself to a variety of questions: What is taste? What is beauty? Is there is a standard of taste and of beauty? What is the relation between the beauty of nature and that of artistic representation? What is the relation between one fine art and another? How ought the fine arts be ranked one against another? What is the nature of the sublime and ought it be ranked with the beautiful? What is the nature of genius (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  • Approaching Awe, a Moral, Spiritual, and Aesthetic Emotion.Dacher Keltner & Jonathan Haidt - 2003 - Cognition and Emotion 17 (2):297-314.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   104 citations  
  • Upheavals of Thought. The Intelligence of Emotions.Martha C. Nussbaum - 2003 - Tijdschrift Voor Filosofie 65 (1):174-175.
    Download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   210 citations  
  • Wonder, the Rainbow, and the Aesthetics of Rare Experiences.Philip Fisher - 2006 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 64 (2):295-297.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations