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  1. A User's Guide to Thought and Meaning.Ray Jackendoff - 2012 - Oxford University Press.
    A profoundly arresting integration of the faculties of the mind - of how we think, speak, and see the world. Written with an informality that belies the originality of its insights and the radical nature of its conclusions this is the author's most important book since his groundbreaking Foundations of Language in 2002.
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  • Turning the Tables: Language and Spatial Reasoning.Peggy Li & Lila Gleitman - 2002 - Cognition 83 (3):265-294.
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  • Cognitive Effects of Language on Human Navigation.Anna Shusterman, Sang Ah Lee & Elizabeth S. Spelke - 2011 - Cognition 120 (2):186-201.
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  • Does Language Guide Event Perception? Evidence From Eye Movements.Anna Papafragou, Justin Hulbert & John Trueswell - 2008 - Cognition 108 (1):155.
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  • Spatial Reasoning in Tenejapan Mayans.Peggy Li, Linda Abarbanell, Lila Gleitman & Anna Papafragou - 2011 - Cognition 120 (1):33-53.
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  • Categories and Induction in Young Children.Susan A. Gelman & Ellen M. Markman - 1986 - Cognition 23 (3):183-209.
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  • Time in the Mind: Using Space to Think About Time.Daniel Casasanto & Lera Boroditsky - 2008 - Cognition 106 (2):579-593.
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  • How Words Mean: Lexical Concepts, Cognitive Models, and Meaning Construction.Vyvyan Evans - 2009 - Oxford University Press.
    These are central to the accounts of lexical representation and meaning construction developed, giving rise to the Theory of Lexical Concepts and Cognitive ...
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  • Consistent Names as Invitations to Form Object Categories: New Evidence From 12-Month-Old Infants.Sandra R. Waxman & Irena Braun - 2005 - Cognition 95 (3):B59-B68.
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  • Language as Context, Language as Means: Spatial Cognition and Habitual Language Use.Eric Pederson - 1995 - Cognitive Linguistics 6 (1):33-62.
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  • Critical Notices: The Language of Thought. [REVIEW]Thomas Wasow - 1978 - Synthese 38 (1):161-167.
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  • The Cognitive Functions of Language.Peter Carruthers - 2002 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 25 (6):657-674.
    This paper explores a variety of different versions of the thesis that natural language is involved in human thinking. It distinguishes amongst strong and weak forms of this thesis, dismissing some as implausibly strong and others as uninterestingly weak. Strong forms dismissed include the view that language is conceptually necessary for thought (endorsed by many philosophers) and the view that language is _de facto_ the medium of all human conceptual thinking (endorsed by many philosophers and social scientists). Weak forms include (...)
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  • Thought, Language, and the Argument From Explicitness.Agustín Vicente & Fernando Martínez-Manrique - 2008 - Metaphilosophy 39 (3):381–401.
    This article deals with the relationship between language and thought, focusing on the question of whether language can be a vehicle of thought, as, for example, Peter Carruthers has claimed. We develop and examine a powerful argument—the "argument from explicitness"—against this cognitive role of language. The premises of the argument are just two: (1) the vehicle of thought has to be explicit, and (2) natural languages are not explicit. We explain what these simple premises mean and why we should believe (...)
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  • Semantic Underdetermination and the Cognitive Uses of Language.Agustin Vicente & Fernando Martinez-Manrique - 2005 - Mind and Language 20 (5):537–558.
    According to the thesis of semantic underdetermination, most sentences of a natural language lack a definite semantic interpretation. This thesis supports an argument against the use of natural language as an instrument of thought, based on the premise that cognition requires a semantically precise and compositional instrument. In this paper we examine several ways to construe this argument, as well as possible ways out for the cognitive view of natural language in the introspectivist version defended by Carruthers. Finally, we sketch (...)
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  • Thinking Through Language.Paul Bloom & Frank C. Keil - 2001 - Mind and Language 16 (4):351–367.
    What would it be like to have never learned English, but instead only to know Hopi, Mandarin Chinese, or American Sign Language? Would that change the way you think? Imagine entirely losing your language, as the result of stroke or trauma. You are aphasic, unable to speak or listen, read or write. What would your thoughts now be like? As the most extreme case, imagine having been raised without any language at all, as a wild child. What—if anything—would it be (...)
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  • The Origins of Concepts.Daniel A. Weiskopf - 2008 - Philosophical Studies 140 (3):359 - 384.
    Certain of our concepts are innate, but many others are learned. Despite the plausibility of this claim, some have argued that the very idea of concept learning is incoherent. I present a conception of learning that sidesteps the arguments against the possibility of concept learning, and sketch several mechanisms that result in the generation of new primitive concepts. Given the rational considerations that motivate their deployment, I argue that these deserve to be called learning mechanisms. I conclude by replying to (...)
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  • The Origin of Concepts.Susan Carey - 2009 - Oxford University Press.
    Only human beings have a rich conceptual repertoire with concepts like tort, entropy, Abelian group, mannerism, icon and deconstruction. How have humans constructed these concepts? And once they have been constructed by adults, how do children acquire them? While primarily focusing on the second question, in The Origin of Concepts , Susan Carey shows that the answers to both overlap substantially. Carey begins by characterizing the innate starting point for conceptual development, namely systems of core cognition. Representations of core cognition (...)
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  • Can Language Restructure Cognition? The Case for Space.Asifa Majid, Melissa Bowerman, Sotaro Kita, Daniel B. M. Haun & Stephen C. Levinson - 2004 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 8 (3):108-114.
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  • The Language of Thought.J. A. Fodor - 1978 - Critica 10 (28):140-143.
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  • Language, Thought, and Color: Whorf Was Half Right.Terry Regier & Paul Kay - 2009 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 13 (10):439-446.
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  • The Role of Language in Acquiring Object Kind Concepts in Infancy.Fei Xu - 2002 - Cognition 85 (3):223-250.
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  • Who's Afraid of the Big Bad Whorf? Crosslinguistic Differences in Temporal Language and Thought.Daniel Casasanto - unknown
    The idea that language shapes the way we think, often associated with Benjamin Whorf, has long been decried as not only wrong but also fundamentally wrong-headed. Yet, experimental evidence has reopened debate about the extent to which language influences nonlinguistic cognition, particularly in the domain of time. In this article, I will first analyze an influential argument against the Whorfian hypothesis and show that its anti-Whorfian conclusion is in part an artifact of conflating two distinct questions: Do we think in (...)
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  • When Language Affects Cognition and When It Does Not: An Analysis of Grammatical Gender and Classification.Maria D. Sera, Chryle Elieff, James Forbes, Melissa Clark Burch, Wanda Rodríguez & Diane Poulin Dubois - 2002 - Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 131 (3):377-397.
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  • A User's Guide to Thought and Meaning.Ray Jackendoff - 2012 - Oxford University Press.
    A profoundly arresting integration of the faculties of the mind - of how we think, speak, and see the world. Written with an informality that belies the originality of its insights and the radical nature of its conclusions, this is the author's most important book since his groundbreaking Foundations of Language in 2002.
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  • Sortal Concepts, Object Individuation, and Language.Fei Xu - 2007 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 11 (9):400-406.
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  • Special Issue.[author unknown] - 1987 - Journal of Phenomenological Psychology 18 (1-2):100-100.
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  • What Makes Us Smart? Core Knowledge and Natural Language.Elizabeth S. Spelke - 2003 - In Dedre Getner & Susan Goldin-Meadow (eds.), Language in Mind: Advances in the Study of Language and Thought. MIT Press. pp. 277--311.
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  • Sex, Syntax, and Semantics.Lera Boroditsky, Lauren A. Schmidt & Webb Phillips - 2003 - In Dedre Getner & Susan Goldin-Meadow (eds.), Language in Mind: Advances in the Study of Language and Thought. MIT Press. pp. 61--79.
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  • From “Thought and Language” to “Thinking for Speaking”.Dan I. Slobin - 1996 - In J. Gumperz & S. Levinson (eds.), Rethinking Linguistic Relativity. Cambridge University Press. pp. 70--96.
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  • Rethinking Linguistic Relativity.J. Gumperz & S. Levinson (eds.) - 1996 - Cambridge University Press.
    This book reexamines ideas about linguistic relativity in the light of new evidence and changes in theoretical climate.
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  • Language and Thought.Lila Gleitman & Anna Papafragou - 2005 - In K. Holyoak & B. Morrison (eds.), Cambridge Handbook of Thinking and Reasoning. Cambridge University Press. pp. 633--661.
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  • Language in Cognition.Peter Carruthers - 2008 - In E. Margolis, R. Samuels & S. Stich (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Philosophy of Cognitive Science. Oxford University Press.
    In E. Margolis, R. Samuels, and S. Stich (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Philosophy of Cognitive Science. Oxford University Press, 2008.
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  • Words and the Mind: How Words Capture Human Experience.Barbara Malt & Phillip Wolff (eds.) - 2010 - Oxford University Press USA.
    The study of word meanings promises important insights into the nature of the human mind by revealing what people find to be most cognitively significant in their experience. However, as we learn more about the semantics of various languages, we are faced with an interesting problem. Different languages seem to be telling us different stories about the mind. For example, important distinctions made in one language are not necessarily made in others. What are we to make of these cross-linguistic differences? (...)
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  • Introduction to Part III.John Gumperz & Stephen Levinson - 1996 - In J. Gumperz & S. Levinson (eds.), Rethinking Linguistic Relativity. Cambridge University Press. pp. 17--225.
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