Results for 'Don McIntosh'

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  1.  51
    Horrendous Evil and Christian Theism: A Reply to John W. Loftus.Don McIntosh - 2024 - Trinity Journal of Natural and Philosophical Theology 2 (1):25-44.
    In his recent article, “God and Horrendous Suffering,” John W. Loftus argues that what he calls horrendous suffering is incompatible with traditional theism. The extent of horrendous suffering in the world, he says, “means that either God does not care enough to eliminate it, or God is not smart enough to eliminate it, or God is not powerful enough to eliminate it.” For Loftus, however, the problem is not simply evil, but horrendous suffering, a particularly acute form of evil which (...)
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  2.  23
    Is the History of Science Evidence for Naturalism? A Reply to Jeffery Jay Lowder.Don McIntosh - 2023 - Trinity Journal of Natural and Philosophical Theology 1 (2):69-87.
    As formulated by atheist Jeffery Jay Lowder, the Evidential Argument from the History of Science, or AHS, is premised on the observation that over the course of modern history, naturalistic explanations have progressively overtaken supernaturalistic explanations. That history, says Lowder, constitutes evidence that metaphysical naturalism is true (hence that theism is false). But it’s possible that the historical pattern as described is not actually the result of any genuine explanatory virtues of naturalistic over supernaturalistic explanations. If there are good reasons (...)
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  3. Idealism and Common Sense.C. A. McIntosh - 2021 - In Joshua R. Farris & Benedikt Paul Göcke (eds.), The Routledge Handbook of Idealism and Immaterialism. New York, NY: Routledge. pp. 496-505.
    The question I wish to explore is this: Does idealism conflict with common sense? Unfortunately, the answer I give may seem like a rather banal one: It depends. What do we mean by ‘idealism’ and ‘common sense?’ I distinguish three main varieties of idealism: absolute idealism, Berkeleyan idealism, and dualistic idealism. After clarifying what is meant by common sense, I consider whether our three idealisms run afoul of it. The first does, but the latter two don’t. I conclude that while (...)
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  4. Why does God exist?C. A. Mcintosh - 2022 - Religious Studies 58 (1):236-257.
    Many philosophers have appealed to the PSR in arguments for a being that exists a se, a being whose explanation is in itself. But what does it mean, exactly, for something to have its explanation ‘in itself’? Contemporary philosophers have said next to nothing about this, relying instead on phrases plucked from the accounts of various historical figures. In this article, I analyse five such accounts – those of Anselm, Aquinas, Descartes, Spinoza, and Leibniz – and argue that none are (...)
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  5. A Spectrum View of the Imago Dei.C. A. McIntosh - 2023 - Religions 14 (2).
    I explore the view that the imago Dei is essential to us as humans but accidental to us as persons. To image God is to resemble God, and resemblance comes in degrees. This has the straightforward—and perhaps disturbing—implication that we can be more or less human, and possibly cease to be human entirely. Hence, I call it the spectrum view. I argue that the spectrum view is complementary to the Biblical data, helps explain the empirical reality of horrendous evil, and (...)
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  6. How to understand the knowledge norm of assertion: Reply to Schlöder.Jonny McIntosh - 2020 - Thought: A Journal of Philosophy 9 (3):207-214.
    Julian Schlöder (2018) examines Timothy Williamson's proposal that knowledge is the norm of assertion within the context of deontic logic. He argues for two claims, one concerning the formalisation of the thesis that knowledge is a norm of assertion and another concerning the formalisation of the thesis that knowledge is the only norm of assertion. On the basis of these claims, Schlöder goes on to raise a series of problems for Williamson's proposal. In response, I argue that both of Schlöder's (...)
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  7. The God of the Groups: Social Trinitarianism and Group Agency.C. A. McIntosh - 2016 - Religious Studies 52 (2):167-186.
    I argue that Social Trinitarians can and should conceive of God as a group person. They can by drawing on recent theories of group agency realism that show how groups can be not just agents but persons distinct from their members – albeit, I argue, persons of a different kind. They should because the resultant novel view of the Trinity – that God is three ‘intrinsicist’ persons in one ‘functional’ person – is theologically sound, effectively counters the most trenchant criticisms (...)
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  8. For All the Right Reasons.C. A. McIntosh - 2019 - In Bob Fischer (ed.), Ethics, Left and Right: The Moral Issues that Divide Us. New York: Oxford University Press. pp. 94-101.
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  9. Houston, Do We Have a Problem?C. A. McIntosh & Tyler Dalton McNabb - 2021 - Philosophia Christi 23 (1):101-124.
    Would the existence of extraterrestrial intelligent life conflict in any way with Christian belief? We identify six areas of potential conflict. If there be no conflict in any of these areas—and we argue ultimately there is not—we are confident in declaring that there is no conflict, period. This conclusion underwrites the integrity of theological explorations into the existence of ETI, which has become a topic of increasing interest among theologians in recent years.
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  10. Why We Need the Arts: John Macmurray on Education and the Emotions.Esther McIntosh - 2015 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 47 (1):47-60.
    This article argues that Macmurray’s work on education is deserving of serious consideration, because it offers an account of the person that highlights the significance of the emotions and the arts. In particular, the article examines and teases out the areas of Macmurray’s concept of the person that are pertinent to the philosophy of education, which includes the contention that the emotions can and should be educated. Furthermore, on the basis of Macmurray’s work, this article argues that emotional competency is (...)
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  11. John Macmurray as a Scottish Philosopher: The Role of the University and the Means to Live Well.Esther McIntosh - 2015 - In Gordon Graham (ed.), Scottish Philosophy in the Nineteenth and Twentieth Centuries. Oxford, GB: Oxford University Press. pp. 270-302.
    John Macmurray (1891-1976) was born in Scotland and began his philosophical education in a Scottish university. As an academic philosopher, following in the footsteps of Caird’s Scottish idealism - a reaction against the debate between Hume’s scepticism and Reid’s ‘commonsense’ – Macmurray holds that a university education in moral philosophy is essential for producing virtuous citizens. Consequently, Macmurray’s philosophy of human nature includes a ‘thick’ description of the person, which is more holistic that Cartesianism and emphasizes the relation of persons. (...)
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  12. Technology and the Lifeworld: From Garden to Earth.Don Ihde - 1990 - Indiana University Press.
    "... Dr. Ihde brings an enlightening and deeply humanistic perspective to major technological developments, both past and present." —Science Books & Films "Don Ihde is a pleasure to read.... The material is full of nice suggestions and details, empirical materials, fun variations which engage the reader in the work... the overall points almost sneak up on you, they are so gently and gradually offered." —John Compton "A sophisticated celebration of cultural diversity and of its enabling technologies.... perhaps the best single (...)
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  13. Postphenomenology and Technoscience: The Peking University Lectures.Don Ihde - 2009 - State University of New York Press.
    Maps the future of phenomenological thought, accounting for how technology expands our means of experiencing the world.
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  14. Review: Linda Zagzebski, Omnisubjectivity: A Defense of a Divine Attribute. [REVIEW]Chad McIntosh - 2015 - European Journal for Philosophy of Religion 7 (4):254--259.
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  15. Review: Brian Leftow, God and Necessity. [REVIEW]C. A. McIntosh - 2014 - Philosophy in Review 34 (3-4):142-146.
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  16. Hume's Geography of Feeling in A Treatise of Human Nature.Don Garrett - forthcoming - In Elizabeth S. Radcliffe (ed.), Hume's A Treatise of Human Nature: A Critical Guide. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
    Hume describes “mental geography” as the endeavor to know “the different operations of the mind, to separate them from each other, to class them under their proper heads, and to correct all that seeming disorder, in which they lie involved, when made the object of reflection and enquiry.” While much has been written about his geography of thought in Treatise Book 1, relatively little has been written about his geography of feeling in Books 2 and 3, with the result that (...)
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  17. Notions of Cause: Russell’s Thesis Revisited.Don Ross & David Spurrett - 2007 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 58 (1):45-76.
    We discuss Russell's 1913 essay arguing for the irrelevance of the idea of causation to science and its elimination from metaphysics as a precursor to contemporary philosophical naturalism. We show how Russell's application raises issues now receiving much attention in debates about the adequacy of such naturalism, in particular, problems related to the relationship between folk and scientific conceptual influences on metaphysics, and to the unification of a scientifically inspired worldview. In showing how to recover an approximation to Russell's conclusion (...)
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  18. Abortion Revisited.Don Marquis - 2007 - In Bonnie Steinbock (ed.), The Oxford handbook of bioethics. New York: Oxford University Press.
    The three major classical accounts of the morality of abortion are all subject to at least one major problem. Can we do better? This article aims to discuss three accounts that purport to be superior to the classical accounts. First, it discusses the future of value argument for the immorality of abortion. It defends the claim that the future of value argument is superior to all three of the classical accounts. It then goes on to discuss Warren's attempt to fix (...)
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  19. From Chaos to Cosmos: Sacred Space in Genesis.Don Michael Hudson - 1996 - Zeitschrift Für Die Alttestamentliche Wissenschaft:88-97.
    With the appearance of Mircea Eliade's The Sacred and the Profane came the inauguration of theologians and philosophers questioning the preeminence of scholarly attention given to time to the virtual exclusion of space.
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  20. Searching for Our Fathers.Don Michael Hudson - 1998 - Mars Hill, USA: Mars Hill Review.
    "I tried to find out for myself, from the start, when I was a child, what was right and what was wrong-because no one around me could tell me. And now that everything is leaving me I realize I need someone to show me the way and to blame me and praise me, by right not ofp ower but ofa uthority, I need my father." -Albert Camus, The First Man.
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  21. When Time Stumbled: Judges as Postmodern.Don Michael Hudson - 1999 - Dissertation, Westminster Theological Seminary
    What do we do with Judges? This two-edged word? This ambidextrous book? These ambivalent heroes? The Judges were drawing their last fleeting breaths shipwrecked and scattered upon the shores of historical-critical-grammatical-linear-modernist-masculine interpretation. "The narrative is primitive," they said. "The editors have made a mess," they exclaimed. "The conclusion is really an appendix," another said. Then the bible-acrobats jumped in pretending there was no literary carnage while at the same time drawing our eyes away from the literary carnage. "No, no, there (...)
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  22. "And what of Beauty?" Compassionate Lifestyle.Don Michael Hudson - unknown - Sojourners (NA):42-46.
    We lose something central to our humanity when we divide our world into neat little packages of sacred and secular.
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  23. Newcomb's perfect predictor.Don Hubin & Glenn Ross - 1985 - Noûs 19 (3):439-446.
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  24. Forgetting to Remember: How We Run from Our Stories.Don Michael Hudson - 1997 - Mars Hill Review (8):41-65.
    Aimee did not want to survive; she neither wanted to live nor to die.
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  25. Love Language Lost: Martin Heidegger and the Fall of Language.Don Michael Hudson - 1999 - Mars Hill Review 15:47-55.
    It is quite fair to say that to the degree language works is also to the degree language does not work.
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  26. Erring on the side of life: the case of Terri Schiavo.Don A. Merrell - 2009 - Journal of Medical Ethics 35 (5):323-325.
    In debates over life and death it is often said that one should err on the side of caution—that is, on the side of life. In light of the recent case of Terri Schiavo, it is explained how the “err-on-the-side-of-life” argument proceeds, and an objection to it is offered.
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  27. Truths about Simpson's Paradox - Saving the Paradox from Falsity.Don Dcruz, Prasanta S. Bandyopadhyay, Venkata Raghavan & Gordon Brittain Jr - 2015 - In M. Banerjee & S. N. Krishna (eds.), LNCS 8923. pp. 58-75.
    There are three questions associated with Simpson’s paradox (SP): (i) Why is SP paradoxical? (ii) What conditions generate SP? and (iii) How to proceed when confronted with SP? An adequate analysis of the paradox starts by distinguishing these three questions. Then, by developing a formal account of SP, and substantiating it with a counterexample to causal accounts, we argue that there are no causal factors at play in answering questions (i) and (ii). Causality enters only in connection with action.
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  28. The Three Languages of Mentoring: Saul, Jonathan, and David--Which Will I Be?Don Michael Hudson - 1996 - Mars Hill Review:23-31.
    Our generation is turning to mentoring as an instrument of God to repair the ruin of our personal losses.
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  29. Numerically Aided Methods in Phenomenology: A Demonstration.Don Kuiken, Don Schopflocher & T. Wild - 1989 - Journal of Mind and Behavior 10 (4):373-392.
    Phenomenological psychology has emphasized that experience as it is immediately "given" to the experiencing individual is an appropriate subject matter for psychological investigation. Consideration of the methodological implications of this stance suggests that certain text analytic and cluster analytic methods could be used to discern the identifying properties of different types of experience. We present results of a study in which textual analysis was used to identify recurrent properties of participants' verbal accounts of their experience, cluster analysis was used to (...)
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  30. Ghosts and Ion Counters.Don A. Merrell - 2008 - Skeptical Inquirer 32 (6).
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  31. Living by Story.Don Michael Hudson - unknown - Foundations A New Series:36-37.
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  32. "Michelangelo's Pieta," Christianity and the Arts.Don Michael Hudson - 2001 - America's Guide to Christian Expresssion 8 (4):24.
    It was the summer of 1984, the American dollar was strong, and this was my first venture to Europe. I found her and didn't even know I was searching for her. Mysteriously she crossed my path one day in Rome. I should confess though- at this point in my life, I am an uneasy Protestant.
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  33. Living in a Land of Epithets: Anonymity in Judges 19-21.Don Michael Hudson - 1994 - Journal for the Study of the Old Testament 62:49-66.
    Judges is about loss: a loss of the individual which leads to a loss of the tribe, and, if circumstances remain unchecked, a loss of the nation.
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  34. "Afterword," Royer's Round Top Cafe: A Relational Odyssey.Don Michael Hudson - 1995 - Favorite Recipes Press:NA.
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  35. Polger on the Illusion of Contingent Identity.Don Merrell - 2011 - International Journal of Philosophical Studies 19 (4):593 - 602.
    Thomas Polger has argued in favor of the mind-brain type-identity theory, the view that mental states or processes are type-identical to states of the central nervous system. Acknowledging that the type-materialist must respond to Kripke's modal anti-materialist argument, Polger insists that Kripke's argument rests on dubious assumptions concerning the identity conditions of brain states. In brief, Polger claims that one knows that x and y are non-identical when one knows the identity conditions for both x and y. Replace x and (...)
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  36. The Atheological Argument from Geography.Don A. Merrell - 2019 - Southwest Philosophy Review 35 (1):229-235.
    Occasionally, in the introductory philosophy courses I teach, a student will give an interesting argument for non-belief in God. Though I have never seen this argument in print, it seems familiar. Basically, the argument goes like this. Religious belief is largely determined by geography – where you are born and raised largely determines your religious beliefs. But believing something just because of where you are born and raised is not a reliable indication of whether that belief turns out to be (...)
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  37. There, In the Shadows: The Grace of Art in a "River Runs Through It".Don Michael Hudson - 2013 - Imagination Et Ratio:1-10.
    "Any man-any artist, as Nietzsche or Cezanne would say- climbs the stairway in the tower of his perfection at the cost of a struggle with a deunde-not with an angel, as some have maintained, or with his muse. This fundamental distinction must be kept in mind if the root of a work of art is to be grasped." -Frederico Garcia Lorca.
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  38. Come, Bring Your Story.Don Michael Hudson - 1994 - Mars Hill Review:73-86.
    It is only the story... that saves our progeny from blundering like blind beggars into the spikes of the cactus fence. The story is our escort. Without we are blind. -Chinua Achebe, Anthills of the Savannah.
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  39. The Dance of Truth.Don Michael Hudson - manuscript
    We want God to make sense, to be reasonable, to act according to how we think God should act. This kind of thinking, though, is not far from where we live today. If I give money to the church, then God will bless me financially. If I have my “quiet time” in scripture, then God will bless my day. If I raise my children right, then surely they will turn out right. In themselves these actions are good and right; however, (...)
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  40. Afterword to Relational Odyssey.Don Michael Hudson - unknown - Afterword to Relational Odyssey:171.
    "Everything is a pretext for a good dinner.".
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  41. Living by Story--A Counselor's Creed.Don Michael Hudson - 1997 - Inklings Magazine:8.
    We live in a world of many odd-shaped pieces, a cosmic jigsaw puzzle that often seems to have been further complicated by cruel fate.
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  42. "On Earth As It Is In Heaven": Is Art Necessary for the Christian?Don Michael Hudson - 1995 - Mars Hill Review (2):31-40.
    Narcissus has no need of art because his own reflection preoccupies him.
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  43. Reading the Word(l)d. Art, Beauty, and the Voice of God.Don Michael Hudson - 2003 - Sojourners Press:42-47.
    Art, beauty, and the voice of God. And what of beauty?
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  44. Dictionary of Biblical Imagery.Don Michael Hudson - 1998 - Unknown: Intervarsity Press.
    An encyclopedic exploration of the images, symbols, motifs, metaphors, figures of speech and literary patterns of the Bible.
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  45. Everyday Study Bible: "Garden of Eden, Adam, Flood, and Deborah".Don Michael Hudson - 1996 - Nashville, USA: Nelson Bibles.
    What is the relationship between prophetic vision and vision in terms for a hoped-for future? How might vision for a church or person best be defined today?
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  46. To FInd a Place: Sacred Living in a Secular World.Don Michael Hudson - 1997 - Mars Hill, USA: Mars Hill Review Fall.
    Compassion is called out of us when we see situations where there is an obvious absence of something or someone life-giving.
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  47. The Glory of His Discontent: The Inconsolable Suffering of God.Don Michael Hudson - 1996 - Mars Hill, USA: Mars Hill Review Fall.
    "He who is satisfied has never truly craved. And he who craves for the light of God neglects his ease for ardor." -Rabbi Abraham J. Heschel.
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  48. Lost in Translation? The Upaniṣadic Story about “Da” and Interpretational Issues in Analytic Philosophy.Don Dcruz, Prasanta S. Bandyopadhyay & Venkata Raghavan - 2015 - Apa Newsletter on Asian and Asian-American Philosophers and Philosophies 2 (14):15-18.
    In the Bṛhadāraṇyaka Upaniṣad, one of the principal Upaniṣads, we find a venerable and famous story where the god Prajāpati separately instructs three groups of people (gods, humans, and demons) simply by uttering the syllable “Da.” In this paper, our concern is not with ethics but theories of meaning and interpretation: How can all divergent interpretations of a single expression be correct, and, indeed, endorsed by the speaker? As an exercise in cross-cultural philosophical reflection, we consider some of the leading (...)
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  49. Truth.Don Deere - 2014 - In Leonard Lawlor & John Nale (eds.), The Cambridge Foucault Lexicon. New York City: Cambridge University Press. pp. 517-527.
    In his final works, Foucault explains his overall project as a “history of truth” centered on the relations between subjectivity and truth. While the early archaeology focuses primarily on the formation of new objects and discourses of knowledge, and later, genealogy on techniques of power, the problematic of truth is the overriding framework through which Foucault develops these analyses. Throughout all of his work, in fact, Foucault’s question is how discourse, institutions, politics, and subjects are established within regimes of truth.
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  50. The trap of nothing: the (archaic) consubstantiality of My Man Godfrey.Don Kunze - 2022 - Vestigia 3 (1):151-172.
    Gregory La Cava’s 1936 screwball comedy film My Man Godfrey is structured by consubstantiality, which will be defined here as the reification of a second, oppositional element in response to the negation of a first. Because the second element is conditioned by the very thing it negated, a third element is required to reverse the (subjective) point of view as corollary to the first, objective reversal. The film takes place in the depths of the Great Depression; its story centers on (...)
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