38 found
Order:
See also
Edmund Byrne
Indiana University Purdue University, Indianapolis
  1.  62
    Commentary on Lawrence Blum's "I'm Not a Racist, But...": The Moral Quandary of Race. [REVIEW]Edmund F. Byrne - 2004 - Social Philosophy Today 19:239-241.
    A complimentary assessment of Blum's award-winning book about racism and its affects. Well written as it is, it needs to be supplemented with a definition of racial injustice, and also to analyze racism not only on the level of individual morality but from a human rights perspective that discredits political and economic motives for racism (e.g., by drawing on Hannah Arendt's Origins of Totalitarianism).
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   32 citations  
  2. The U.S. Military-Industrial Complex is Circumstantially Unethical.Edmund F. Byrne - 2010 - Journal of Business Ethics 95 (2):153 - 165.
    Business ethicists should examine not only business practices but whether a particular type of business is even prima facie ethical. To illustrate how this might be done I here examine the contemporary U.S. defense industry. In the past the U.S. military has engaged in missions that arguably satisfied the just war self-defense rationale, thereby implying that its suppliers of equipment and services were ethical as well. Some recent U.S. military missions, however, arguably fail the self-defense rationale. At issue, then, is (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   10 citations  
  3. Assessing Arms Makers' Corporate Social Responsibility.Edmund F. Byrne - 2007 - Journal of Business Ethics 74 (3):201 - 217.
    Corporate social responsibility (CSR) has become a focal point for research aimed at extending business ethics to extra-corporate issues; and as a result many companies now seek to at least appear dedicated to one or another version of CSR. This has not affected the arms industry, however. For, this industry has not been discussed in CSR literature, perhaps because few CSR scholars have questioned this industry's privileged status as an instrument of national sovereignty. But major changes in the organization of (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  4. Business Ethics Should Study Illicit Businesses: To Advance Respect for Human Rights.Edmund F. Byrne - 2011 - Journal of Business Ethics 103 (4):497-509.
    Business ethics should include illicit businesses as targets of investigation. For, though such businesses violate human rights they have been largely ignored by business ethicists. It is time to surmount this indifference in view of recent international efforts to define illicit businesses for regulatory purposes. Standing in the way, however, is a meta-ethical question as to whether any business can be declared unqualifiedly immoral. In support of an affirmative answer I address a number of counter-indications by comparing approaches to organized (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  5. Business Ethics: A Helpful Hybrid in Search of Integrity.Edmund F. Byrne - 2002 - Journal of Business Ethics 37 (2):121 - 133.
    What sort of connection is there between business ethics and philosophy? The answer given here: a weak one, but it may be getting stronger. Comparatively few business ethics articles are structurally dependent on mainstream academic philosophy or on such sub-specialities thereof as normative ethics, moral theory, and social and political philosophy. Examining articles recently published in the Journal of Business Ethics that declare some dependence, the author finds that such declarations often constitute only a pro forma gesture which could be (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   8 citations  
  6. In Lieu of a Sovereignty Shield, Multinational Corporations Should Be Responsible for the Harm They Cause.Edmund F. Byrne - 2014 - Journal of Business Ethics 124 (4):609-621.
    Some progress has been made in recent decades to articulate corporate social responsibility (CSR) and, more recently, to associate CSR with international enforcement of human rights. This progress continues to be hampered, however, by the ability of a multinational corporation (MNC) that violates human rights not only to shift liability from itself to a nation-state but even to win compensation from that nation-state for loss of profits due to restrictions on its business activities. In the process, the nation-state’s sovereignty is (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  7.  53
    Appropriating Resources: Land Claims, Law, and Illicit Business.Edmund F. Byrne - 2012 - Journal of Business Ethics 106 (4):453-466.
    Business ethicists should examine ethical issues that impinge on the perimeters of their specialized studies (Byrne 2011 ). This article addresses one peripheral issue that cries out for such consideration: the international resource privilege (IRP). After explaining briefly what the IRP involves I argue that it is unethical and should not be supported in international law. My argument is based on others’ findings as to the consequences of current IRP transactions and of their ethically indefensible historical precedents. In particular I (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  8.  96
    The Post-9/11 State of Emergency: Reality Versus Rhetoric.Edmund F. Byrne - 2004 - Social Philosophy Today 19:193-215.
    After the 9/11 attacks the U.S. administration went beyond emergency response towards imperialism, but cloaked its agenda in the rhetoric of fighting ‘terrorists’ and ‘terrorism.’ After distinguishing between emergency thinking and emergency planning, I question the administration’s “war on terrorism” rhetoric in three stages. First, upon examining the post-9/11 antiterrorism discourse I find that it splits into two agendas: domestic, protect our infrastructure; and foreign, select military targets. Second, I review approaches to emergency planning already in place. Third, after reviewing (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  9.  97
    Review Article: Just War Theory and Peace Studies. [REVIEW]Edmund F. Byrne - 2009 - Teaching Philosophy 32 (3):297-304.
    Scholarly critiques of the just war tradition have grown in number and sophistication in recent years to the point that available publications now provide the basis for a more philosophically challenging Peace Studies course. Focusing on just a few works published in the past several years, this review explores how professional philosophers are reclaiming the terrain long dominated by the approach of political scientist Michael Walzer. On center stage are British philosopher David Rodin’s critique of the self-defensejustification for war and (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  10.  60
    Towards Enforceable Bans on Illicit Businesses: From Moral Relativism to Human Rights.Edmund F. Byrne - 2014 - Journal of Business Ethics 119 (1):119-130.
    Many scholars and activists favor banning illicit businesses, especially given that such businesses constitute a large part of the global economy. But these businesses are commonly operated as if they are subject only to the ethical norms their management chooses to recognize, and as a result they sometimes harm innocent people. This can happen in part because there are no effective legal constraints on illicit businesses, and in part because it seems theoretically impossible to dispose definitively of arguments that support (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  11.  49
    Leave No Oil Reserves Behind, Including Iraq's: The Geopolitics of American Imperialism.Edmund F. Byrne - 2006 - Radical Philosophy Today 2006:39-54.
    Just war theory needs to become a real-time critique of government war propaganda in order to facilitate peace advocacy ante bellum. This involves countering asserted justificatory reasons with demonstrable facts that reveal other motives, thereby yielding reflective understanding which can be collectivized via electronic media. As a case in point, I compare here the publicly declared reasons for the U.S./U.K. invasion of Iraq in 2003 with reasons discussed internally months and even years before in government and think-tank documents. These sources (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  12.  48
    Business-Inflicted Social Harm.Edmund F. Byrne - 1998 - In Yeager Hudson (ed.), Technology, Morality and Social Policy. Lewiston: Edwin Mellen Press. pp. 55-73.
    Businesses cause social harm, meaning harm to society at large and not just to those with whom a business is contractually linked. Evidence introduced: normative claims that businesses should be "socially responsible"; positive claims that they contribute to social well-being; and negative claims that they are sometimes military-like, causing extensive harm for which no one is held personally responsible. The latter point to corporate survivalism, which acknowledges no mandatory civil responsibilities. Neither law nor social pressure has yet counteracted this mind (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  13.  80
    Ethical Aspects of Information Technology, by Richard A. Spinello. [REVIEW]Edmund F. Byrne - 1988 - Teaching Philosophy 21 (2):198-200.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  14.  66
    The President of Good & Evil: The Ethics of George W. Bush, by Peter Singer. [REVIEW]Edmund F. Byrne - 2004 - Teaching Philosophy 27 (4):388-391.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  15.  59
    The Two-Tiered Ethics of EDP.Edmund F. Byrne - 1995 - Journal of Business Ethics 14 (1):53-61.
    Ethical questions regarding access to and use of electronically generated data are (if asked) commonly resolved by distinguishing in Lockean fashion between raw (unworked) and refined (worked) data. The former is thought to belong to no one, the latter to the collector and those to whom the collector grants access. Comparative power separates free riders from rightful owners. The resulting two-tiered ethics of access is here challenged on the grounds that it inequitably establishes a rule of law for the strong (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  16.  26
    Reviewing Academic Books: Are There Ethical Issues?Edmund F. Byrne - 2002 - Journal of Information Ethics 11 (1):57-65.
    The process of deciding which books academics submit should be published favors authors who are associated with the most prestigious universities and other research institutions. Some feel this bias could be minimized if the review of academic books were carried out as anonymously as is the review of articles for journal publication. Not likely to happen soon, however, because both academic and publishing industries promote the hierarchy of perceived excellence that permeates the process of publishing academic books. To find this (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  17.  60
    Review of Democracy and Difference: Contesting the Boundaries of the Political, Edited by Seyla Benhabib. [REVIEW]Edmund F. Byrne - 1999 - Teaching Philosophy 22 (1):99-101.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  18.  56
    Violence and Democracy, by John Keane. [REVIEW]Edmund F. Byrne - 2005 - Teaching Philosophy 28 (4):376-378.
    John Keane’s book is an important intervention in the debate on the persistent proliferation of violence and its role in political life, especially in democracies.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  19.  68
    Review of Praying for a Cure: When Medical and Religious Practices Conflict, by Peggy DesAutels, Margaret P. Battin, and Larry May. [REVIEW]Edmund F. Byrne - 2002 - Teaching Philosophy 25 (1):75-77.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  20.  57
    Building Community Into Property.Edmund F. Byrne - 1988 - Journal of Business Ethics 7 (3):171 - 183.
    American business's fascination with both laborsaving devices and low wage environments is causing not only structural unemployment and dissipation of the nation's industrial base but also the deterioration of abandoned host communities. According to individualist understandings of the right of private property, this deterioration is beyond sanction except insofar as it affects the property rights of others. But corporate stockholders and managers should not be considered the only owners of property the value of which is due in part to the (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  21.  47
    The Compensatory Rights of Emerging Interest Groups.Edmund F. Byrne - 1993 - Social Philosophy Today 8:397-416.
    Author argues that an emerging interest group, especially one that seeks to reverse past discrimination against its predecessors in the public arena, is entitled to enhanced consideration as a means of achieving long denied but merited rights. First this thesis is defended by identifying both practical need and theoretical support for emerging interest groups. Then these findings are applied specifically to the rights of women as an emerging interest group. (Publisher left off last word of title: 'Groups'.).
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  22.  76
    Why Politics Needs Religion: The Place of Religious Arguments in the Public Square, by Brendan Sweetman. [REVIEW]Edmund F. Byrne - 2008 - Teaching Philosophy 31 (2):192-196.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  23.  50
    Can Arms Be Sold Responsibly in the Global Market?Edmund F. Byrne - 2007 - Social Philosophy Today 23:103-114.
    Corporate social responsibility (CSR) research has ignored the arms industry, in large part because of political assumptions that tie this industry to nation-state sovereignty. Bypassing this obsolescent Westphalian world-view, I examine the US arms industry on the basis of CSR requirements regarding the environment, social equity, profitability, and use of political power. I find the arms industry fails each of these four CSR requirements. In response to the assertion that the arms industry should not be subject to CSR requirements because (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  24.  39
    Displaced Workers: Whose Responsibility?Edmund F. Byrne - 1984 - Bowling Green Studies in Applied Philosophy 6:74-87.
    As a way of identifying factors that come into play in determining responsibility for displaced workers, author reviews a number of well known arguments for or against responsibility on the part of diverse actors in society. Key figures in this search for responsibility are corporations, unions, and government. No definitive responsibility is asserted.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  25.  48
    Controlling Technology: Contemporary Issues, Edited by William B. Thompson. [REVIEW]Edmund F. Byrne - 1994 - Teaching Philosophy 17 (2):185-188.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  26.  39
    Trade Barriers to the Public Good: Free Trade and Environmental Protection, by Alex Michalos. [REVIEW]Edmund F. Byrne - 2011 - Techné: Research in Philosophy and Technology 15 (3):235-237.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  27.  36
    Introduction.Edmund F. Byrne - 2001 - Journal of Business Ethics 29 (4):287 - 288.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  28.  44
    The Philosophical Challenge of September 11, Edited by Tom Rockmore, Joseph Margolis, and Armen T. Marsoobian. [REVIEW]Edmund F. Byrne - 2006 - Teaching Philosophy 29 (3):269-271.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  29.  61
    Terrorism and International Justice, Edited by James P. Sterba. [REVIEW]Edmund F. Byrne - 2004 - Teaching Philosophy 27 (2):181-184.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  30.  52
    Displaced Workers: America's Unpaid Debt.Edmund F. Byrne - 1985 - Journal of Business Ethics 4 (1):31 - 41.
    The U.S. doctrine of employment-at-will, modified legislatively for protected groups, is being less harshly applied to managerial personnel. Comparable compensation is not otherwise available in the U.S. to workers displaced by technology. Nine pairs of arguments are presented to show how fundamentally management and labor disagree about a company's responsibility for its former employees. These arguments, born of years of labor-management debate, are kaleidoscopic claims about which side has what power. Ultimately, however, not even both together can solve without creative (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  31.  20
    Review of Mark L. Greenberg and Lance Schacterle (Eds.) Literature and Technology. [REVIEW]Edmund F. Byrne - 1993 - Dialogue (Misc) 13 (5):235-237.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  32.  23
    The Philosopher's Voice: Philosophy, Politics, and Language in the Nineteenth Century, by Andrew Fiala. [REVIEW]Edmund F. Byrne - 2004 - Journal of Speculative Philosophy 18 (4):333-335.
    A positive review of a book about four nineteenth century German philosophers (Kant, Fichte, Hegel, and Marx) who sought to use philosophy to effect political change. To this end they each decided whom to address and how. Their objective: enhance freedom and/or enlightenment. Final topic: the relevance of these writers and their agenda to contemporary philosophy.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  33.  43
    Comments on Phillip Cole's Philosophies Of Exclusion. [REVIEW]Edmund F. Byrne - 2002 - Social Philosophy Today 18:185-189.
    This year's book award committee reviewed thirty nominated books. We identified seven finalists, each well worth our special attention: Milton Fisk's impressive Towards a Healthy Society, Gary Francione's feisty Introduction to Animal Rights, Timothy Gaffaney's engaging Freedom for the Poor, David Ingram's historically insightful Group Rights, Rachel Roth's poignant Making Women Pay, Karen Warren's finely articulated Ecofeminist Philosophy, and the eventual winning entry, Phillip Cole's Philosophies of Exclusion: Liberal Political Theory and Immigration. We're here today to discuss this important book.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  34.  36
    Review of Thinking Like an Engineer: Studies in the Ethics of a Profession, by Michael Davis. [REVIEW]Edmund F. Byrne - 2000 - Teaching Philosophy 23 (3):306-309.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  35.  49
    The Depersonalization of Violence: Reflections on the Future of Personal Responsibility.Edmund F. Byrne - 1973 - Journal of Value Inquiry 7 (3):161-172.
    The intent of this article is to discredit the much used concept (often unstated) of virtuous violence. To begin with, it is a paradox hence in need of not easily achieved justification. Here author's critique focuses on the political myth of prophetic righteousness, the ethical myth of a common good, and the myth of the infinite, which is utilized all too often to bypass finite systems. (Article sharply criticized when first presented to a faculty group.).
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  36.  37
    Give Peace a Chance: A Mantra for Business Strategy.Edmund F. Byrne - 1999 - Journal of Business Ethics 20 (1):27 - 37.
    The journalistic device of applying military imagery to describe business strategies is appropriate insofar as businesses implicitly base their strategies on a military model whose origins lie in Social Darwinism. What this involves is an unexamined understanding that any means may be adopted to achieve corporate objectives. Recent workforce reductions are manifestations of this understanding; but so are practices associated with mergers and acquisitions and with government-effectuated takings. Regulation, rather than being overbroad, cannot contain these corporate excesses; and social pressure (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  37.  42
    Public Goods and the Paying Public.Edmund F. Byrne - 1995 - Journal of Business Ethics 14 (2):117 - 123.
    This paper proposes a way to undercut anarchist objections to taxation without endorsing an authoritarian justification of government coercion. The argument involves public goods, as understood by economists and others. But I do not analyse options of autonomous prisoners and the like; for, however useful otherwise, these abstractions underestimate the real-world task of sorting out the prerogatives of and limits on ownership. Proceeding more contextually, I come to recommend a shareholder addendum to the doctrine of public goods. This recommendation involves (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  38.  29
    John M. Riteris 1935 - 1979.Edmund F. Byrne - 1979 - In Proceedings and Addresses of the American Philosophical Association. pp. 223.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark