Results for 'Gorgias'

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  1. Punishment and Psychology in Plato’s Gorgias.J. Clerk Shaw - 2015 - Polis 32 (1):75-95.
    In the Gorgias, Socrates argues that just punishment, though painful, benefits the unjust person by removing injustice from her soul. This paper argues that Socrates thinks the true judge (i) will never use corporal punishment, because such procedures do not remove injustice from the soul; (ii) will use refutations and rebukes as punishments that reveal and focus attention on psychological disorder (= injustice); and (iii) will use confiscation, exile, and death to remove external goods that facilitate unjust action.
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  2. "We Are the Disease": Truth, Health, and Politics From Plato's Gorgias to Foucault.C. T. Ricciardone - 2014 - Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy 18 (2):287-310.
    Starting from the importance of the figure of the parrhesiastes — the political and therapeutic truth- teller— for Foucault’s understanding of the care of the self, this paper traces the political figuration of the analogy between philosophers and physicians on the one hand, and rhetors and disease on the other in Plato’s Gorgias. I show how rhetoric, in the form of ventriloquism, infects the text itself, and then ask how we account for the effect of the “ contaminated ” (...)
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  3. Koncepcja apate u Gorgiasza z Leontinoi (Gorgias' Doctrine of Deception).Zbigniew Nerczuk - 2012 - In Iwona Kurz, Paulina Kwiatkowska & Łukasz Zaremba (eds.), Antropologia kultury wizualnej. Zagadnienia i wybór tekstów (Anthropology of visual Culture. Issues and selection of texts). Wydawnictwa Uniwersytetu Warszawskiego. pp. 127-133.
    These are the excerpts from the book "Sztuka a prawda. Problem sztuki w dyskusji między Gorgiaszem a Platonem" concerning Gorgias' theory of apate (deception).
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  4. Socrates Vs. Callicles: Examination and Ridicule in Plato's Gorgias.David Levy - 2013 - Plato: The Internet Journal of the International Plato Society 13:27-36.
    The Callicles colloquy of Plato’s Gorgias features both examination and ridicule. Insofar as Socrates’ examination of Callicles proceeds via the elenchus, the presence of ridicule requires explanation. This essay seeks to provide that explanation by placing the effort to ridicule within the effort to examine; that is, the judgment/pronouncement that something/someone is worthy of ridicule is a proper part of the elenchic examination. Standard accounts of the Socratic elenchus do not include this component. Hence, the argument of this essay (...)
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  5. The Sophistic Cross-Examination of Callicles in the Gorgias.Jyl Gentzler - 1995 - Ancient Philosophy 15 (1):17-43.
    Socrates' cross-examination of Callicles in the 'Gorgias' has traditionally been viewed as a paradigm of the Socratic method. I argue that, when he cross examines Callicles, Socrates behaves out of character. In fact, he acts like a Sophist and violates the very principles of persuasion that he advocates in the 'Gorgias'. I offer an explanation of Socrates' temporary transformation into a Sophist, and suggest that his role-reversal reinforces Plato's representation of Socrates as the model of the virtuous philosopher.
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  6. Truth and Falsehood for Non-Representationalists: Gorgias on the Normativity of Language.Juan Pablo Bermúdez - 2017 - Journal of Ancient Philosophy 11 (2):1-21.
    Sophists and rhetoricians like Gorgias are often accused of disregarding truth and rationality: their speeches seem to aim only at effective persuasion, and be constrained by nothing but persuasiveness itself. In his extant texts Gorgias claims that language does not represent external objects or communicate internal states, but merely generates behavioural responses in people. It has been argued that this perspective erodes the possibility of rationally assessing speeches by making persuasiveness the only norm, and persuasive power the only (...)
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  7. "Pochwała Heleny" Gorgiasza Z Leontinoi (Gorgias' "Helen").Zbigniew Nerczuk - 2012 - Studia Antyczne I Mediewistyczne 10:17-36.
    This is the introduction and the translation of Gorgias' "Helen". The speech is considered to be one of the most interesting pieces of early Greek rhetoric not only because of its rhetorical, but also because of its philosophical value. There is no doubt that it sets out the outlines of the sophistic conception of logos and (along with another Gorgias' speech Palamedes) represents the starting point for the Plato's critique of Gorgias' rhetoric in the dialogue "Gorgias'.
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  8. Gorgiasz z Leontinoi, "Obrona Palamedesa" (Gorgias' "Palamedes").Zbigniew Nerczuk - 2013 - Studia Antyczne I Mediewistyczne 11:3-22.
    This is the introduction and the translation with a vast commentary in the footnotes of Gorgias' "Palamedes".
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  9. Mowa Gorgiasza w Platońskim dialogu „Gorgiasz” (456A1-457C3) (Gorgias' speech in Plato's dialogue "Gorgias" (456A1-457C3)).Zbigniew Nerczuk - 2014 - Studia Antyczne I Mediewistyczne 2014 12 (2014):3-12.
    This is the translation and interpretation of the Gorgias' speech from Plato's dialogue Gorgias (456A1-457C3). In the commentary it is argued that the Gorgias' speech in the dialogue is based on the philosophical and rhetorical motives which can be found both in Gorgias' epideictic speeches ("Helen" and "Palamedes") and doxographical accounts.
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  10.  15
    The Refutation of Gorgias: Notes on a Contradiction.Refik Güremen - 2017 - Peitho 8 (1):237-248.
    This paper claims that Socrates’ refutation of Gorgias in the eponymous dialogue is designed not to find out the truth about the nature of the art of rhetoric itself but to refute the master of rhetoric himself. I try to justify this claim by displaying some major contradictions between the conclusions reached at with Gorgias and those reached at with Polus. When these contradictions are taken into account, the discussion with Polus is to be seen as reflecting the (...)
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  11.  91
    Traktat Gorgiasza "O niebycie" w parafrazie Sekstusa Empiryka (Gorgias' work "On non-being" in the paraphrase of Sextus Empiricus).Zbigniew Nerczuk - 2004 - In Ireneusz Mikołajczyk (ed.), Sapere aude. Księga pamiątkowa ofiarowana profesorowi dr. hab. Marianowi Szarmachowi z okazji 65 rocznicy urodzin. Wydawnictwo UMK. pp. 185-201.
    The paper examines Gorgias' treatise "On non-being" in the paraphrasis of Sextus Empiricus (Adversus mathematicos, VII, 65-87).
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  12.  65
    Sztuka a prawda. Problem sztuki w dyskusji między Gorgiaszem a Platonem (Techne and Truth. The problem of techne in the dispute between Gorgias and Plato).Zbigniew Nerczuk - 2002 - Wydawnictwo Uniwersytetu Wrocławskiego.
    Techne and Truth. The problem of techne in the dispute between Gorgias and Plato -/- The source of the problem matter of the book is the Plato’s dialogue „Gorgias”. One of the main subjects of the discussion carried out in this multi-aspect work is the issue of the art of rhetoric. In the dialogue the contemporary form of the art of rhetoric, represented by Gorgias, Polos and Callicles, is confronted with Plato’s proposal of rhetoric and concept of (...)
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  13. Epistemologia a koncepcja sztuki w Pochwale Heleny i Obronie Palamedesa Gorgiasza z Leontinoi (Epistemology and the conception of techne in Gorgias' Helen and Palamedes).Zbigniew Nerczuk - 1999 - Acta Universitatis Nicolai Copernici, Historia XXXI 330:35-52.
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  14.  93
    Traktat "O Niebycie" Gorgiasza z Leontinoi (Gorgias' treatise "On non-being").Zbigniew Nerczuk - 1997 - Przeglad Filozoficzny - Nowa Seria 23 (3):79-94.
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  15. Kolokwia Platońskie - Gorgias.Artur Pacewicz (ed.) - 2009 - Instytut Filozofii Uniwersytetu Wrocławskiego.
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  16. The Cyrenaics and Gorgias on Language. Sextus, Math. 7. 196-198.Ugo Zilioli - 2013 - Akademia Verlag.
    In this paper I offer a reconstruction of the account of meaning and language the Cyrenaics appear to have defended on the basis of a famous passage of Sextus, as well as showing the philosophical parentage of that account.
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  17. Imitating the Myth in the Gorgias.Efren Alverio - 2001 - Social Science Diliman 2 (1):27-42.
    The advent of logical positivism contributed to the sharp definitional demarcation between what we consider mythical (mythos) and what we take to be a true account (logos). This essay attempts to go back to one of the sources of such a supposed distinction. By analyzing the Gorgias, I will show that even Plato did not make such a distinction. In fact, Plato even constructed a theory of justice that made use of myth as its medium. The Platonic Myth in (...)
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  18. Shame as a Tool for Persuasion in Plato's Gorgias: Plato.Gorgias.D. B. Futter - 2009 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 47 (3):451-461.
    In gorgias, socrates stands accused of argumentative "foul play" involving manipulation by shame. Polus says that Socrates wins the fight with Gorgias by shaming him into the admission that "a rhetorician knows what is right . . . and would teach this to his pupils" . And later, when Polus himself has been "tied up" and "muzzled" , Callicles says that he was refuted only because he was ashamed to reveal his true convictions . These allegations, if justified, (...)
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  19. The Imprint of the Soul: Psychosomatic Affection in Plato, Gorgias, and the “Orphic” Gold Tablets.Phillip Sidney Horky - 2006 - Mouseion 3 (6):383-398.
    Ancient intellectuals from Gorgias of Leontini forward employed the notion of 'imprinting' the soul in order to describe various sorts of psychic affections. The dominant context for this scientific language remains juridical both in 4th Century philosophy (e.g. Plato's description of the soul being whipped in the Gorgias) and in religion (e.g. the soul's imprint as keyword in "Orphic" Gold Tablets). This tradition continues in the fragments of Plutarch's de Libidine et Aegritudine, although without proper attention to its (...)
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  20. Gorgias' Defense: Plato and His Opponents on Rhetoric and the Good.Rachel Barney - 2010 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 48 (1):95-121.
    This paper explores in detail Gorgias' defense of rhetoric in Plato 's Gorgias, noting its connections to earlier and later texts such as Aristophanes' Clouds, Gorgias' Helen, Isocrates' Nicocles and Antidosis, and Aristotle's Rhetoric. The defense as Plato presents it is transparently inadequate; it reveals a deep inconsistency in Gorgias' conception of rhetoric and functions as a satirical precursor to his refutation by Socrates. Yet Gorgias' defense is appropriated, in a streamlined form, by later defenders (...)
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  21. The Rhetoric of Morality and Philosophy: Plato’s “Gorgias” and “Phaedrus”.Seth BENARDETE - 1991 - University of Chicago Press.
    Benardete here interprets and, for the first time, pairs two important Platonic dialogues, the Gorgias and the Phaedrus . In linking these dialogues, he places Socrates' notion of rhetoric in a new light and illuminates the way in which Plato gives morality and eros a place in the human soul.
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  22. Commentary on "A Man of No Substance: The Philosopher in Plato's Gorgias," by S. Montgomery Ewegen.Joseph M. Forte - forthcoming - Proceedings of the Boston Area Colloquium of Ancient Philosophy.
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  23.  55
    Eleatic Philosophy J. H. M. M. Loenen: Parmenides, Melissus, Gorgias. A Reinterpretation of Eleatic Philosophy. Pp. 207. Assen: Van Gorcum, 1959. Paper, Fl. 14.50. [REVIEW]G. B. Kerferd - 1961 - The Classical Review 11 (01):26-27.
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  24.  80
    Untying the Gorgianic ‘Not’: Argumentative Structure in on Not-Being.Evan Rodriguez - 2019 - Classical Quarterly 69 (1):87-106.
    Gorgias’ On Not-Being survives only in two divergent summaries. Diels–Kranz's classic edition prints the better-preserved version that appears in Sextus’ Aduersus Mathematicos. Yet, in recent years there has been rising interest in a second summary that survives as part of the anonymous De Melisso, Xenophane, Gorgia. The text of MXG is more difficult; it contains substantial lacunae that often make it much harder to make grammatical let alone philosophical sense of. As Alexander Mourelatos reports, one manuscript has a scribal (...)
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  25. Socrates and the True Political Craft.J. Clerk Shaw - 2011 - Classical Philology 106:187-207.
    This paper argues that Socrates does not claim to be a political expert at Gorgias 521d6-8, as many scholars say. Still, Socrates does claim a special grasp of true politics. His special grasp (i) results from divine dispensation; (ii) is coherent true belief about politics; and (iii) also is Socratic wisdom about his own epistemic shortcomings. This condition falls short of expertise in two ways: Socrates sometimes lacks fully determinate answers to political questions, and he does not grasp the (...)
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  26. Gorgiasz a Platon. Przyczynek do historii empiryzmu.Zbigniew Nerczuk - 1997 - Ruch Filozoficzny 54 (3):405-409.
    The paper is concerned with the epistemological foundation of Plato's criticism of Gorgias' rhetoric in the dialogue "Gorgias".
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  27. Do You Really Know How to Cook?Lisa Heldke - 2001 - Philosophy Now 31:12-15.
    In the Gorgias, Plato contrasts pastry cooking unfavorably with medicine, in order to illustrate the difference he believes exists between a mere knack and a genuine art. I attempt to show that Plato’s treatment of cooking distorts or misconceives that activity, and does so in order to shore up his arguments about the distinction between arts and knacks, and about the separation and hierarchy between minds and bodies. Plato’s treatment of cookery seems to be informed not by the activity (...)
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  28. The Problem of Alcibiades: Plato on Moral Education and the Many.Joshua Wilburn - 2015 - Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy 49:1-36.
    Socrates’ admirers and successors in the fourth century and beyond often felt the need to explain Socrates’ reputed relationship with Alcibiades, and to defend Socrates against the charge that he was a corrupting influence on Alcibiades. In this paper I examine Plato’s response to this problem and have two main aims. First, I will argue in Section 2 that (...)
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  29. The Sophistic Movement.Rachel Barney - 2006 - In M. L. Gill & P. Pellegrin (eds.), A Companion to Ancient Philosophy. Blackwell.
    This discussion emphasises the diversity, philosophical seriousness and methodological distinctiveness of sophistic thought. Particular attention is given to their views on language, ethics, and the social construction of various norms, as well as to their varied, often undogmatic dialectical methods. The assumption that the sophists must have shared common doctrines (not merely overlapping interests and professional practices) is called into question.
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  30. Socrates and Callicles on Pleasure.Scott Berman - 1991 - Phronesis 36 (2):117-140.
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  31. Sokrates sam ze sobą rozmawia o sprawiedliwości [Socrates Talks to Himself about Justice]. Piechowiak - 2009 - In Artur Pacewicz (ed.), Kolokwia Platońskie - Gorgias. Instytut Filozofii Uniwersytetu Wrocławskiego. pp. 71-92.
    The analysis focuses on the passage of Gorgias (506c–507c) in which Plato’s Socrates is having a dialog with himself. Socrates is talking to someone who, better than any other partner of discussion, is capable to discern the truth; this is an extraordinary way of expressing philosophical views by Plato. It suggests that in this passage Plato is considering questions which are of a primary importance. There are also other signs, both in the structure of the text and in the (...)
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  32.  82
    Platońska krytyka estetyki Gorgiasza w dialogu "Gorgiasz".Zbigniew Nerczuk - 1997 - Sztuka I Filozofia (Art and Philosophy) 13:112-122.
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  33.  63
    Traktat Gorgiasza O niebycie w parafrazie Sekstusa Empiryka.Zbigniew Nerczuk - 2004 - In Ireneusz Mikołajczyk (ed.), Sapere aude. Toruń. pp. 185-201.
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  34.  60
    The Unity of the Soul in Plato's Republic.Eric Brown - 2012 - In Rachel Barney, Tad Brennan & Charles Brittain (eds.), Plato and the Divided Self. Cambridge, UK: pp. 53-73.
    This essay argues that Plato in the Republic needs an account of why and how the three distinct parts of the soul are parts of one soul, and it draws on the Phaedrus and Gorgias to develop an account of compositional unity that fits what is said in the Republic.
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  35.  73
    Plato on Pleasures Mixed with Pains: An Asymmetrical Account.Mehmet M. Erginel - 2019 - Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy 56:73-122.
    In this paper I aim to show that the restoration model of pleasure as we find it in Plato’s Gorgias, Republic, Timaeus, and Philebus contain a common psychological core, despite the substantial developments and greater sophistication in the later works. I argue that, contrary to the scholarly consensus, all four dialogues take the necessary condition for pain to be a state of imbalance or disharmony rather than a process of destruction or deterioration. Given that the necessary condition for pleasure (...)
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  36.  42
    la ética calicleana.Javier Echenique - 2019 - Anales Del Seminario de Historia de la Filosofía 1 (36):11-28.
    The purpose of this article is to offer a reconstruction of the moral theory defended by Callicles in Plato’s Gorgias, aided by other contemporary texts that contribute to explain and refine such a theory. The first step of this reconstruction is to show that Callicles offers a perspectivist theory of moral judgements, according to which moral judgements can be issued from two radically distinct perspectives, the contractual and the natural one. The second step is to show that Callicles makes (...)
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  37. Platonism, Moral Nostalgia and the City of Pigs.Rachel Barney - 2001 - Proceedings of the Boston Area Colloquium of Ancient Philosophy 17 (1):207-27.
    Plato’s depiction of the first city in the Republic (Book II), the so-called ‘city of pigs’, is often read as expressing nostalgia for an earlier, simpler era in which moral norms were secure. This goes naturally with readings of other Platonic texts (including Republic I and the Gorgias) as expressing a sense of moral decline or crisis in Plato’s own time. This image of Plato as a spokesman for ‘moral nostalgia’ is here traced in various nineteenth- and twentieth-century interpretations, (...)
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  38. ¿Retórica O Verdad? La “tercera Vía” De Platón.Gabriela Rossi - 2003 - Revista Latinoamericana de Filosofia 29 (2):285-316.
    This paper deals with Plato’s theoretical views on rhetoric, its value, its conditions, and its genuine ethical-political function. My goal is to show that, even from the theoretical and/or metarhetorical point of view (Gorgias and Phaedrus), Plato would admit the practice of arguing from probabilities (eikós) and opinions, and would accept as a legitimate part of rhetoric –in order to persuade the mob– devices such as appeals to emotion. As it is well known, concrete uses of these devices can (...)
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  39. Pleasure.Cory Wimberly - 2015 - In Blackwell Encyclopedia of Political Thought. Chichester: Blackwell. pp. 2716-2720.
    The history of the political thought on pleasure is not a cloistered affair in which scholars only engage one another. In political thought, one commonly finds a critical engagement with the wider public and the ruling classes, which are both perceived to be dangerously hedonistic. The effort of many political thinkers is directed towards showing that other political ends are more worthy than pleasure: Plato battles vigorously against Calicles' pleasure seeking in the Gorgias, Augustine argues in The City of (...)
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  40. Koncepcja Logosu W Sofistyce (The Doctrine of Logos in the Sophistic Thought).Zbigniew Nerczuk - 2011 - In Dariusz Kubok & Dariusz Olesiński (eds.), Postacie i funkcje logosu w filozofii greckiej. Wydawnictwo Sto. pp. 19-26.
    The paper is concerned with the role of the logos in the sophistic thought. The author argues that the importance of logos is a result of the conviction that according to the Sophists human reality is somehow „created” through words in the process of constant communication and interpretation. This idea inspires the Sophists to research on the particular conditions of the process of persuasion and to analyze the factors which determine the persuasive power of speech. This interest in the power (...)
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  41. Introduction to "Sophistae".Rafael Ferber - 2014 - In Fulvia de Luise & Alessandro Stavru (eds.), Socratica III. Academia Verlag. pp. 201-203.
    Plato’s “Apology of Socrates” is a masterpiece of the philosophical literature. The question remains as to how much it has been influenced by earlier works, e.g. of Gorgias of Leontinoi and Euripides. Nevertheless, comparative studies on Hippolytus’ defense in Euripides’ tragedy of the same name, on Gorgias’ “Defense of Palamedes” and on Plato’s “Apology” do not exist. The short paper gives an introduction into the status quaestionis.
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  42. Gorgiasza meontologia vs. nihilizm.Seweryn Blandzi - 2012 - Argument: Biannual Philosophical Journal 2 (2):245 - 264.
    Meontology of Gorgias vs. Nihilism. The purpose of this paper is to challenge Gorgias’ image of a “nihilist existentialist”. The original thesis ouden estin, too frequently rendered as „nothing exists”, thus reducing the verb “to be” to denote “bare” existence, and ouden to denote “nothingness”. On close inspection, it turns out that, in Gorgias, neither do we have a negation of reality nor an affirmative treatment of the word “nothingness”.Therefore, ouden” should not be understood as a negation (...)
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  43. Miarą Jest Każdy Z Nas: Projekt Zwolenników Zmienności Rzeczy W Platońskim Teajtecie Na Tle Myśli Sofistycznej (Each of us is a measure. The project of advocates of change in Plato’s Theaetetus as compared with sophistic thought).Zbigniew Nerczuk - 2009 - Wydawn. Nauk. Uniwersytetu Mikołaja Kopernika.
    Each of us is a measure. The project of advocates of change in Plato’s Theaetetus as compared with sophistic thought -/- Summary -/- One of the most intriguing motives in Plato’s Theaetetus is its historical-based division of philosophy, which revolves around the concepts of rest (represented by Parmenides and his disciples) and change (represented by Protagoras, Homer, Empedocles, and Epicharmus). This unique approach gives an opportunity to reconstruct the views of marginalized trend of early Greek philosophy - so called „the (...)
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  44.  42
    Panorama Histórico dos Problemas Filosóficos.Emanuel Isaque Cordeiro da Silva - manuscript
    Antes de entrar cuidadosamente no estudo de cada filósofo, em suas respectivas ordens cronológicas, é necessário dar um panorama geral sobre eles, permitindo, de relance, a localização deles em tempos históricos e a associação de seus nomes com sua teoria ou tema central. l. OS FILÓSOFOS PRÉ-SOCRÁTICOS - No sétimo século antes de Jesus Cristo, nasce o primeiro filósofo grego: Tales de Mileto2 . Ele e os seguintes filósofos jônicos (Anaximandro: Ἀναξίμανδρος: 3 610-546 a.C.) e Anaxímenes: (Άναξιμένης: 586-524 a.C.) tentaram (...)
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