Results for 'Islam, Susfism, Shah Kazim, Holy place, Sufi saint, Qalander, spiritual guide'

4 found
Order:
  1. हज़रत शाह काज़िम कलन्दर.सुहैल काकोरवी - 2014 - SOCRATES 2 (1):262-269.
    Muslim Sufi ideology had been spread by the saints who came from various Islamic countries. The cultural and religious atmosphere of India was very favourable for Sufism which has a power to move the minds towards humanity and philanthropy. Quran teaches us that we must love God vehemently and the effect of which produces love for his creations. Sufis in their effort followed the commands of Almighty. They tried to come near all sorts of human beings and understood their (...)
    Download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  2. Philosophy of Sufism and Islam.Desh Raj Sirswal - 2016 - Lokayata: Journal of Positive Philosophy (01):34-38.
    Many different meanings are attributed to the term Sufi. From the philosophical standpoint the sufi sect leans towards the mystic tradition, while taken etymologically the word implies anything which is extracted from wool. Sufi was the term applied to those individuals who went through life wearing a woolen gown, spending their life in mediation and prayer. Other scholars are of the opinion that the terms sufi is derived from the root “Suffa” which is applicable to the (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  3.  43
    Discernment of Good and Evil in Dostoevsky’s Novels: The Madman and the Saint.Christoph Schneider - 2020 - European Journal for Philosophy of Religion 12 (4):117-137.
    This article discusses madness and saintliness in Dostoevsky’s novels and investigates how the madman and the saint discern between good and evil. I first explore the metaphysical, spiritual, and moral universe of Dostoevsky’s characters by drawing on William Desmond’s philosophy of the between. Second, I argue that the madman’s misconstrual of reality can be grasped as an idolatrous, divisive, and parodic imitation of the good. Third, I reflect on disembodied discernment. In some cases, due to the weakness of the (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  4.  91
    Not Without a Guide: The Role of Reason in the Orthodox Tradition.Todd Trembley - manuscript
    Reading only the contemporary and popular literature on the Orthodox spiritual life, it is possible to get the impression that Orthodox Christianity affirms only mystical theology and that it has no place for philosophical investigation, rational inquiry, or thinking for oneself. In this paper I show that this view of the relationship between philosophy and the Orthodox Christian life is one-sided and distorted. For while it is certainly true that reason is impotent to lay bare the very nature of (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark