Results for 'Philosophy for Children'

995 found
Order:
  1. Philosophy for Children in Australia: Then, Now, and Where to From Here?Gilbert Burgh & Simone Thornton - 2016 - Re-Engaging with Politics: Re-Imagining the University, 45th Annual Conference of the Philosophy of Education Society of Australasia, ACU, Melbourne, 5-8 Dec 2015.
    In the late 1960s Matthew Lipman and his colleagues at IAPC developed an educational philosophy he called Philosophy for Children. At the heart of Philosophy for Children is the community of Inquiry, with its emphasis on classroom dialogue, in the form of collaborative philosophical inquiry. In this paper we explore the development of educational practice that has grown out of Philosophy for Children in the context of Australia. -/- Australia adapted Lipman’s ideas on (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  2. Philosophy for Children Meets the Art of Living: A Holistic Approach to an Education for Life.L. D'Olimpio & C. Teschers - 2016 - Philosophical Inquiry in Education 23 (2):114-124.
    This article explores the meeting of two approaches towards philosophy and education: the philosophy for children approach advocated by Lipman and others, and Schmid’s philosophical concept of Lebenskunst. Schmid explores the concept of the beautiful or good life by asking what is necessary for each individual to be able to develop their own art of living and which aspects of life are significant when shaping a good and beautiful life. One element of Schmid’s theory is the practical (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  3.  94
    Philosophy for Children in China:: A Late Preliminary Anti-Report.David Kennedy & Walter Kohan - 2002 - Analytic Teaching and Philosophical Praxis 22 (1):37-49.
    At the very least, even though Chinese schools do not look very different from those in the West, China offers an opportunity for Philosophy for Children to question its basis, its methodology, its aims. It seems to be expressing a different cultural voice, and to be disposed to the kind of dialogue we are more used to claiming than practicing. Both Kunming and Shanghai provide, in their own ways, formidable contexts: the deep, strong and disciplined educators of Railway (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  4.  42
    Philosophy for Children: A Model Curriculum for Model Schools.Tony W. Johnson - 1989 - Analytic Teaching and Philosophical Praxis 10 (1):77-86.
    As many as you know, the title of this article was also the title of an international philosophy for children symposium held at the Menger Hotel in downtown San Antonio on April 12-14, 1989. The symposium was the culminating event of a year-long project in which third, fourth, and fifth grade teachers from four area schools implemented the philosophy for children program in their schools. In addition to a brief history of this project and a summary (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  5. Philosophy for Children and Other People.William J. Rapaport - 1987 - American Philosophical Association Newsletter on Teaching Philosophy (Summer):19-22.
    It is a matter of fact—and has been so for a considerable amount of time—that philosophy is taught at the pre—college level. However, to teach philosophy at that (or at any) level is one thing; to teach it well is quite another. Fortunately, it can be taught well, as a host of successful experiences and programs have shown. But in what ways can it be taught? Are there differences in the ways in which it can or should be (...)
    Download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  6. CHALLENGES IN FRONT OF'PHILOSOPHY FOR CHILDREN'.Khosrow Bagheri & Ehsaneh Bagheri - 2008 - JOURNAL OF CURRICULUM STUDIES (J.C.S.) 2 (7):7-24.
    Philosophy for Children' program that Mathew Lipman and his colleagues have developed is now known in our society and has led to thinking and research in this regard. Thus, to consider the challenges that are in front of this program can lead to the richness of these researches. Three challenges are in front of this program: philosophical, psychological, and educational. The philosophical challenge is due to the point that philosophy is mainly dependent on the history of (...) and thoughts of preceding philosophers. This dependence should of course be along with critique, but this dependence cannot be denied anyway. Hence, philosophizing cannot be reduced to the methods of thinking. Psychological challenge is rooted in the approaches of developmental psychology that emphasize on phases in human thinking. Accordingly, abstract methods of philosophizing cannot be used in the period of childhood. Educational challenge is related to basic cultural values that might be shaken in the process of philosophical interrogations. The philosophical challenge requires that teaching philosophy to children emphasize on an amalgamation of method and content. The psychological challenge makes us cautious as to looking for more investigations on the periodical characteristic of thinking. And finally, the educational challenge requires that criticizing cultural values, being necessary in active education, is not started from foundational issues of culture. The period of childhood can only be fitted to interrogation of low level cultural issues and values and leave the foundational cultural issues to philosophizing in higher ages. (shrink)
    Download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  7. Communication Discourse and Cyberspace: Challenges to Philosophy for Children.Arie Kizel - 2014 - Thinking: The Journal of Philosophy for Children 20 (3-4):40 – 44.
    This article addresses the principal challenges the philosophy for children (P4C) educator/practitioner faces today, particularly in light of the multi-channel communication environment that threatens to undermine the philosophical enterprise as a whole and P4C in particular. It seeks to answer the following questions: a) What status does P4C hold as promoting a community of inquiry in an era in which the school discourse finds itself in growing competition with a communication discourse driven by traditional media tools?; b) What (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  8.  78
    Philosophy for Children Really Works! A Report on a Two Year Empirical Study.Susan T. Gardner - 1998 - Critical and Creative Thinking 6 (1):1-13.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  9. REFRAMING AND PRACTICING COMMUNITY INCLUSION: THE RELEVANCE OF PHILOSOPHY FOR CHILDREN.Roberto Franzini Tibaldeo - 2014 - Childhood and Philosophy 10 (20):401-420.
    I wish to carry out a philosophical inquiry into contemporary intercultural public spheres. The thesis I will support is that the achievement of inclusive public spheres (namely, with respect to our European and Western experience, the accomplishment of democracy) largely depends on one’s willingness and capacity to foster an “appreciation of diversities” by first, enhancing policies and forms of cooperation between the citizens’ emotional and motivational resources, and then enhancing their cognitive competences. More specifically, my proposal is to understand such (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  10.  71
    A Seminar on Philosophy for/with Children as a Dialogical Space Between Jews and Arabs at the University of Haifa.Arie Kizel - 2021 - In International Association for Teachers of Philosophy at Schools and Universities Yearbook. Zürich: pp. 176-184.
    In recent years, the educational-system development specialization of the MA program in the University of Haifa’s Faculty of Education has held an annual seminar on Philosophy for/with Children (P4wC). Under my guidance, Jewish, Muslim, Christian, Druze, and Circassian students have formed a group embodying a living and breathing dialogical space. Despite the global spread of P4wC principles following the emergence of the P4C movement promoted by the International Council of Philosophical Inquiry and its practice in dozens of national (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  11. Reframing and Practicing Community Inclusion. The Relevance of Philosophy for Children.Roberto Franzini Tibaldeo - 2014 - Childhood and Philosophy 10 (20):401-420.
    I wish to carry out a philosophical inquiry into the present day intercultural public spheres. The thesis I endeavour to support is that the achievement of inclusive public spheres largely depends on one’s willingness and capacity to foster the “appreciation of diversities” by first, enhancing policies and forms of cooperation between the citizens’ emotional and motivational resources, and then enhancing their cognitive competences. More specifically, my proposal is to understand such an effort from the viewpoint of post-Weberian responsibility, that is (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  12. Discourses of Educational Rights in Philosophy for Children: On the Theoretical and Practical Merits of Philosophical Education for Children.Aireen Grace Andal - 2019 - AVANT. Trends in Interdisciplinary Studies 11 (2).
    This article aims to put into dialogue Philosophy for Children (P4C) and education rights. Whereas rights have robust conceptualizations and have been the topic of many scholarly discussions, scholarship on P4C still has a lot to unpack for a more expansive understanding, especially when scaled up to the level of rights. This work asks whether or not the rhetoric of “rights” can be used to discuss if P4C has a rightful place to be a mandatory part of school (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  13. Dialogic Practice in Primary Schools: How Primary Head Teachers Plan to Embed Philosophy for Children Into the Whole School. Education Studies.Sue Lyle - 2012 - Educational Studies 38 (1):1-12.
    The Philosophy for Children in Schools Project is an ongoing research project to explore the impact of philosophy for children (P4C) on classroom practice. this paper responds on the responses of head teachers, teachers and local educational authority (LA) officers in South Wales, UK, to the initial training programme in P4C carried out by the University School of Education. Achieving change in schools through the embedding of new practices is an important challenge for head teacher.s Interviews (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  14. Kizel, A. (2016). “Philosophy with Children as an Educational Platform for Self-Determined Learning”. Cogent Education, Vol. 3, Number 1: 1244026.Arie Kizel - 2016 - Cogent Education 3 (1):1244026.
    This article develops a theoretical framework for understanding the applicability and relevance of Philosophy with Children in and out of schools as a platform for self-determined learning in light of the developments of the past 40 years. Based on the philosophical writings of Matthew Lipman, the father of Philosophy for Children, and in particular his ideas regarding the search for meaning, it frames Philosophy with Children in six dimensions that contrast with classic classroom disciplinary (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  15. Philosophy for/with Children, Religious Education and Education for Spirituality. Steps Toward a Review of the Literature.Maughn Rollins Gregory & Stefano Oliverio - 2018 - In Ellen Duthie, Félix García Moriyón & Rafael Robles Loro (eds.), Parecidos de familia. Propuestas actuales en Filosofía para Niños / Family resemblances. Current proposals in Philosophy for Children. Madrid, Spain: Anaya. pp. 279-296.
    The authors describe the organization of a review of research literature on the relationship between Philosophy for/with Children (P4/wC) and religious education/education for spirituality (RE-EfS). They summarize a debate about whether the two are mutually enhancing or incompatible. They explain delimiting the scope of the project and present a grid of research questions used to analyze the literature. They summarize findings on how P4/wC is relevant to five categories of aims of RE-EfS: hermeneutical, cultural, socio-political, moral/spiritual, and epistemological. (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  16. Resisting the 'View From Nowhere': Positionality in Philosophy for/with Children Research.Peter Paul Elicor - 2020 - Philosophia International Journal of Philosophy (Philippines) 1 (21):10-33.
    While Philosophy for/with Children (P4wC) provides a better alternative to the usual ‘banking’ model of education, questions have been raised regarding its applicability in non-western contexts. Despite its adherence to the ideals of democratic dialogue, not all members of a Community of Inquiry (COI) will be disposed to participate in the inquiry, not because they are incapable of doing so, but because they are positioned inferiorly within the group thereby affecting their efforts to speak out on topics that (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  17. Enacting Dialogue: The Impact of Promoting Philosophy for Children on the Literate Thinking of Identified Poor Readers, Aged 10.Philip Jenkins - 2010 - Language and Education 24 (6):459-472.
    The Philosophy for Children in Schools Project (P4CISP) is a research project to monitor and evaluate the impact of Philosophy for Children (P4C) on classroom practices. In this paper the impact of P4C on the thinking skills of you children aged 10 is examined. Standardised tests indicated the children had below-average reading ages. The pupils were video recorded while engaged in discussion of questions they had formulated themselves in response to a series of texts (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  18. Expanding the Facilitator's Toolbox: Vygotskian Mediation in Philosophy for Children.Jacob Castleberry & Kevin Clark - 2020 - Analytic Teaching and Philosophical Praxis 40 (2):44-56.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  19.  50
    An Education for “Practical” Conceptual Analysis in the Practice of “Philosophy for Children”.Arthur Wolf - 2018 - Analytic Teaching and Philosophical Praxis 39 (1):73-88.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  20. Philosophical Inquiry with Indigenous Children: An Attempt to Integrate Indigenous Knowledge in Philosophy for/with Children.Peter Paul Elicor - 2019 - Childhood and Philosophy 15:1-22.
    In this article, I propose to integrate indigenous knowledges in the Philosophy for/with Children theory and practice. I make the claim that it is possible to treat indigenous knowledges, not only as topics for philosophical dialogues with children but as presuppositions of the philosophical activity itself within the Community of Inquiry. Such integration is important for at least three (3) reasons: First, recognizing indigenous ways of thinking and seeing the world informs us of other non-dominant forms of (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  21. Arguments for Nonparental Care for Children.Anca Gheaus - 2011 - Social Theory and Practice 37 (3):483-509.
    I review three existing arguments in favor of having some childcare done by nonparents and then I advance five arguments, most of them original, to the same conclusion. My arguments rely on the assumption that, no matter who provides it, childcare will inevitably go wrong at times. I discuss the importance of mitigating bad care, of teaching children how to enter caring relationships with people who are initially strangers to them, of addressing children's structural vulnerability to their caregivers, (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   15 citations  
  22. Philosophy with Children and the Proprioception of Thinking.Maria daVenza Tillmanns - 2019 - Blog of the APA.
    Proprioception is usually used in reference to body movement and the self-perception of body movement. Proprius in Latin means “one’s own,” or “self.” It refers to the physical knowledge acquired, say, in the process of doing a particular activity, such as riding a bicycle, for instance. You can be told how to ride a bicycle, and this may be of some help. But in the end, it’s the physical knowledge and not the mere theoretical knowledge that enables you to ride (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  23. Mapping Identity Prejudice: Locations of Epistemic Injustice in Philosophy for/with Children.Peter Paul Ejera Elicor - 2020 - Childhood and Philosophy 16 (1):1-25.
    This article aims to map the locations of identity prejudice that occurs in the context of a Community of Inquiry. My claim is that epistemic injustice, which usually originates from seemingly ‘minor’ cases of identity prejudice, can potentially leak into the actual practice of P4wC. Drawing from Fricker, the various forms of epistemic injustice are made explicit when epistemic practices are framed within concrete social circumstances where power, privilege and authority intersect, which is observable in school settings. In connection, despite (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  24. The Application of Proprioception to Doing Philosophy with Children.Maria daVenza Tillmanns - 2019 - Социум И Власть 4 (78):62-68.
    This paper focuses on creating a paradigm shift; looking at how philosophy for and with children can inform philosophy, instead of having philosophy inform philosophy for and with children. My work in doing philosophy with children has shown me the limitations to trying to understand their way of doing philosophy through the lens of how adults understand philosophy and the influence western philosophy has had on the perception of what (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  25.  24
    Daring a Childlike Writing: Children for Philosophy, Moral End, and the Childhood of Conceptions.Walter Kohan & Magda Costa Carvalho - 2022 - In Dina Mendonça & Florian Franken Figueiredo (eds.), Conceptions of Childhood and Moral Education in Philosophy for Children. Metzler. pp. 57-78.
    A child arrives as a new world because in her and with her we feel that the whole world can start over. But that is not the only reason. A child also arrives as a new world because her arrival tells us what, being so simple, we had almost forgotten: that the world is not just old and unquestionable. The child doesn’t let us be indif-ferent; she breaks with conformity and arrives as hope, reeking of the unpredictable. Of questions. A (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  26. Proprioception of Thinking and Emotional Intelligence Are Central to Doing Philosophy with Children.Maria daVenza Tillmanns - 2019
    Philosophy with children often focuses on abstract reasoning skills, but as David Bohm points out the “entire process of mind” consists of our abstract thought as well as our “tacit, concrete process of thought.” Philosophy with children should address the “entire process of mind.” Our tacit, concrete process of thought refers to the process of thought that involves our actions such as the process of thought that goes into riding a bicycle. Bohm contends that we need (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  27. Children and Added Sugar: The Case for Restriction.Theodore Bach - 2018 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 35 (S1):105-120.
    It is increasingly clear that children's excessive consumption of products high in added sugar causes obesity and obesity-related health problems like type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and metabolic syndrome. Less clear is how best to address this problem through public health policy. In contrast to policies that might conflict with adult's right to self-determination — for example sugar taxes and soda bans — this article proposes that children's access to products high in added sugars should be restricted in (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  28. Reconstruction in Philosophy Education: The Community of Inquiry as a Basis for Knowledge and Learning.Gilbert Burgh - 2009 - In Philosophy of Education Society of Australasia (ed.), Proceedings of the Philosophy of Education Society of Australasia 2008 Conference: The ownership and dissemination of knowledge. Claremont, WA, Australia: Philosophy of Education Society of Australasia (PESA). pp. 1-12.
    The ‘community of inquiry’ as formulated by CS Peirce is grounded in the notion of communities of disciplinary-based inquiry engaged in the construction of knowledge. The phrase ‘converting the classroom into a community of inquiry’ is commonly understood as a pedagogical activity with a philosophical focus to guide classroom discussion. But it has a broader application, to transform the classroom into a community of inquiry. The literature is not clear on what this means for reconstructing education and how it translates (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   8 citations  
  29.  83
    Groundwork for Transfeminist Care Ethics: Sara Ruddick, Trans Children, and Solidarity in Dependency.Amy Marvin - 2019 - Hypatia 34 (1):101-120.
    This essay considers the dependency of trans youth by bridging transgender studies with feminist care ethics to emphasize a trans wisdom about solidarity through dependency. The first major section of the essay argues for reworking Sara Ruddick's philosophy of mothering in the context of trans and gender‐creative youth. This requires, first, stressing a more robust interaction among her divisions of preservative love, nurturance for growth, and training for acceptability, and second, creating a more nuanced account of “nature” in relation (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  30. The Need for Philosophy in Promoting Democracy: A Case for Philosophy in the Curriculum.Gilbert Burgh - 2018 - Journal of Philosophy in Schools 5 (1):38-58.
    The studies by Trickey and Topping, which provide empirical support that philosophy produces cognitive gains and social benefits, have been used to advocate the view that philosophy deserves a place in the curriculum. Arguably, the existing curriculum, built around well-established core subjects, already provides what philosophy is said to do, and, therefore, there is no case to be made for expanding it to include philosophy. However, if we take citizenship education seriously, then the development of active (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  31. Kizel, A. (2016). “Pedagogy Out of Fear of Philosophy as a Way of Pathologizing Children”. Journal of Unschooling and Alternative Learning, Vol. 10, No. 20, Pp. 28 – 47.Kizel Arie - 2016 - Journal of Unschooling and Alternative Learning 10 (20):28 – 47.
    The article conceptualizes the term Pedagogy of Fear as the master narrative of educational systems around the world. Pedagogy of Fear stunts the active and vital educational growth of the young person, making him/her passive and dependent upon external disciplinary sources. It is motivated by fear that prevents young students—as well as teachers—from dealing with the great existential questions that relate to the essence of human beings. One of the techniques of the Pedagogy of Fear is the internalization of the (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  32. Teaching Philosophy Through Paintings: A Museum Workshop.Savvas Ioannou, Kypros Georgiou & Ourania Maria Ventista - 2017 - Analytic Teaching and Philosophical Praxis 38 (1):62-83.
    There is wide research about the Philosophy for/with Children program. However, there is not any known attempt to investigate how a philosophical discussion can be implemented through a museum workshop. The present research aims to discuss aesthetic and epistemological issues with primary school children through a temporary art exhibition in a museum in Cyprus. Certainly, paintings have been used successfully to connect philosophical topics with the experiences of the children. We suggest, though, that this is not (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  33. Philosophy Seminars for Five-Year-Olds,.Nicholas Maxwell - 2005 - Learning for Democracy 1 (2):71-77.
    We need a revolution in education, from five year olds onwards, so that exploration of problems is at the heart of the enterprise.
    Download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  34. Philosophy Goes to School in Australia: A History 1982-2016.Gilbert Burgh & Simone Thornton - 2016 - Journal of Philosophy in Schools 3 (1):59-83.
    This paper is an attempt to highlight significant developments in the history of philosophy in schools in Australia. We commence by looking at the early years when Laurance Splitter visited the Institute for the Advancement for Philosophy for Children (IAPC). Then we offer an account of the events that led to the formation of what is now the Federation of Australasian Philosophy in Schools Associations (FAPSA), the development and production of a diverse range of curriculum and (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  35. Children's Well-Being: A Philosophical Analysis.Anthony Skelton - 2015 - In Guy Fletcher (ed.), The Routledge Handbook of Philosophy of Well-being. London. pp. 366-377.
    A philosophical discussion of children's well-being in which various existing views of well-being are discussed to determine their implications for children's well-being and a variety of views of children's well-being are considered and evaluated.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  36. Aporia and the Implications for the Intuitive Knowledge of Children | Blog of the APA.Maria daVenza Tillmanns - 2018 - Blog of the APA.
    The compass we use to navigate life needs to be cultivated from an early age. My sense is that the arts, including Plato’s dialogues cultivate our navigational sense. It does not tell us rationally what is good or what is bad. It is not that simple. Remember, the stars we sail by, are not fixed, either. So we need to develop a sense for what may be right or not in any particular situation. We may have a general sense, but (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  37. The Routledge Handbook of the Philosophy of Childhood and Children.Anca Gheaus, Gideon Calder & Jurgen De Wispelaere (eds.) - 2018 - Routledge.
    Childhood looms large in our understanding of human life as it is a phase through which all adults have passed. Childhood is foundational to the development of selfhood, the formation of interests, values and skills and to the lifespan as a whole. Understanding what it is like to be a child, and what differences childhood makes, are essential for any broader understanding of the human condition. The Routledge Handbook of the Philosophy of Childhood and Children is an outstanding (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  38. Children's Vulnerability and Legitimate Authority Over Children.Anca Gheaus - 2018 - Journal of Applied Philosophy:60-75.
    Children's vulnerability gives rise to duties of justice towards children and determines when authority over them is legitimately exercised. I argue for two claims. First, children's general vulnerability to objectionable dependency on their caregivers entails that they have a right not to be subject to monopolies of care, and therefore determines the structure of legitimate authority over them. Second, children's vulnerability to the loss of some special goods of childhood determines the content of legitimate authority over (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  39. Children and Well-Being.Anthony Skelton - 2018 - In Anca Gheaus, Gideon Calder & Jurgen De Wispelaere (eds.), Routledge Handbook of the Philosophy of Childhood and Children. Abingdon, UK: Routledge. pp. 90-100.
    Children are routinely treated paternalistically. There are good reasons for this. Children are quite vulnerable. They are ill-equipped to meet their most basic needs, due, in part, to deficiencies in practical and theoretical reasoning and in executing their wishes. Children’s motivations and perceptions are often not congruent with their best interests. Consequently, raising children involves facilitating their best interests synchronically and diachronically. In practice, this requires caregivers to (in some sense) manage a child’s daily life. If (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  40. PHILOSOPHY AND VALUES IN SCHOOL EDUCATION OF INDIA.Desh Raj Sirswal - 2010 - Suvidya Journal of Philosophy and Religion 4 (02):00.
    In this paper an attempt is made to draw out the contemporary relevance of philosophy in school education of India. It includes some studies done in this field and also reports on philosophy by such agencies like UNESCO & NCERT. Many European countries emphasises on the above said theme. There are lots of work and research done by many philosophers on philosophy for children. Indian values system is different from the West and more important than others. (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  41. Carefreeness and Children's Wellbeing.Luara Ferracioli - 2020 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 37 (1):103-117.
    In this paper, I investigate the relationship between carefreeness and the valuable goods that constitute a good childhood. I argue that carefreeness is necessary for children to develop positive affective responses to worthwhile projects and relationships, and so is necessary for children to endorse the valuable goods in their lives. One upshot of my discussion is that a child who is allowed to play, who receives an adequate education, and who has loving parents, but who lacks the psychological (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  42.  21
    Towards Education for 21st Century Democratic Citizenry — Philosophical Enquiry Advancing Cosmopolitan Engagement (P.E.A.C.E.) Curriculum: An Intentional Critique.Desiree' Moodley - 2021 - Analytic Teaching and Philosophical Praxis 41 (2):92 - 105.
    Doing philosophy for/with children and exposing students to multiple perspectives, exemplified within the Austrian Centre of Philosophy with Children’s implementation project of the Philosophical Enquiry Advancing Cosmopolitan Engagement (PEACE) curriculum in schooling, may offer a valuable written, taught, and tested curriculum for democratic citizenry. This paper provides an analysis that seeks to present, describe, critique, and make recommendations on the PEACE curriculum. The paper asks the question: In what ways does the Philosophical Enquiry Advancing Cosmopolitan Engagement (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  43.  17
    Towards Education for 21st Century Democratic Citizenry — Philosophical Enquiry Advancing Cosmopolitan Engagement (P.E.A.C.E.) Curriculum: An Intentional Critique.Desiree' Eva Moodley - 2021 - Analytic Teaching and Philosophical Praxis 41 (2):92 - 105.
    Doing philosophy for/with children and exposing students to multiple perspectives, exemplified within the Austrian Centre of Philosophy with Children’s implementation project of the Philosophical Enquiry Advancing Cosmopolitan Engagement (PEACE) curriculum in schooling, may offer a valuable written, taught, and tested curriculum for democratic citizenry. This paper provides an analysis that seeks to present, describe, critique, and make recommendations on the PEACE curriculum. The paper asks the question: In what ways does the Philosophical Enquiry Advancing Cosmopolitan Engagement (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  44. Children of the Mind and the Concept of Edge and Center Nations.Steven Foertsch - 2022 - Journal of Science Fiction and Philosophy 1 (5).
    Orson Scott Card and his Ender Series have had a profound impact on the genre of contemporary science fiction, meriting an academic analysis of some of his more theoretical ideas. I have chosen to analyze his concept of “Center” and “Edge” nations found in Xenocide and Children of the Mind through the lens of international relations, sociological, and political theory, in order to bring nuance to an underdeveloped theory that many non-academics may be familiar with. Ultimately, we must conclude (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  45. Finding Treasures: Is the Community of Philosophical Inquiry a Methodology?Magda Costa Carvalho & Walter Kohan - 2019 - Studies in Philosophy and Education 38 (3):275-289.
    In the world of Philosophy for Children, the word “method” is found frequently in its literature and in its practitioner’s handbooks. This paper focuses on the idea of community of philosophical inquiry as P4C’s methodological framework for educational purposes, and evaluates that framework and those purposes in light of the question, what does it mean to bring children and philosophy together, and what methodological framework, if any, is appropriate to that project? Our broader aim is to (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  46.  34
    Unfinished Adults and Defective Children.Anca Gheaus - 2015 - Journal of Ethics and Social Philosophy 9 (1):1-22.
    Traditionally, most philosophers saw childhood as a state of deficiency and thought that its value was entirely dependent on how successfully it prepares individuals for adulthood. Yet, there are good reasons to think that childhood also has intrinsic value. Children possess certain intrinsically valuable abilities to a higher degree than adults. Moreover, going through a phase when one does not yet have a “self of one’s own,” and experimenting one’s way to a stable self, seems intrinsically valuable. I argue (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   16 citations  
  47. Wronging Future Children.K. Lindsey Chambers - 2019 - Ergo: An Open Access Journal of Philosophy 6.
    The dominant framework for addressing procreative ethics has revolved around the notion of harm, largely due to Derek Parfit’s famous non-identity problem. Focusing exclusively on the question of harm treats what procreators owe their offspring as akin to what they would owe strangers (if they owe them anything at all). Procreators, however, usually expect (and are expected) to parent the persons they create, so we cannot understand what procreators owe their offspring without also appealing to their role as prospective parents. (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  48. Unfinished Adults and Defective Children: On the Nature and Value of Childhood.Anca Gheaus - 2015 - Journal for Ethics and Social Philosophy 9 (1):1-21.
    Traditionally, most philosophers saw childhood as a state of deficiency and thought that its value was entirely dependent on how successfully it prepares individuals for adulthood. Yet, there are good reasons to think that childhood also has intrinsic value. Children possess certain intrinsically valuable abilities to a higher degree than adults. Moreover, going through a phase when one does not yet have a “self of one’s own,” and experimenting one’s way to a stable self, seems intrinsically valuable. I argue (...)
    Download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  49. Global Philosophy: What Philosophy Ought to Be.Nicholas Maxwell - 2014 - Exeter, UK: Imprint Academic.
    These essays are about education, learning, rational inquiry, philosophy, science studies, problem solving, academic inquiry, global problems, wisdom and, above all, the urgent need for an academic revolution. Despite this range and diversity of topics, there is a common underlying theme. Education ought to be devoted, much more than it is, to the exploration real-life, open problems; it ought not to be restricted to learning up solutions to already solved problems - especially if nothing is said about the problems (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  50. More Co-Parents, Fewer Children: Multiparenting and Sustainable Population.Anca Gheaus - 2019 - Essays in Philosophy 20 (1):3-23.
    Some philosophers argue that we should limit procreation – for instance, to one child per person or one child per couple – in order to reduce our aggregate carbon footprint. I provide additional support to the claim that population size is a matter of justice, by explaining that we have a duty of justice towards the current generation of children to pass on to them a sustainable population. But instead of, or, more likely, alongside with, having fewer children (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
1 — 50 / 995